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Profile: Hui-Chieh Loy (National University of Singapore)
  1. Hui-Chieh Loy (2013). On the Argument for Jian'ai. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):487-504.
    In all three versions of the “Jian’ai” 兼愛 Chapter in the Mozi 墨子, variations of a central argument may be found. This argument proceeds by advancing a diagnosis for what causes the various evils that beset the world, and it is on this basis that the Mohists propose jian’ai as the solution. The study examines this main argument in some detail, with the aim of improving both our understanding of the Mohist ethical doctrine and also our appreciation of their argumentative (...)
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  2. Hui-Chieh Loy (2012). The Mozi: A Complete Translation (Review). Philosophy East and West 62 (2):308-311.
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  3. Hui-Chieh Loy (2011). The Word and the Way in Mozi. Philosophy Compass 6 (10):652-662.
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  4. Hui-chieh Loy (2009). Review of Mengzi, Bryan W. Van Norden (Trans.), Mengzi: With Selections From Traditional Commentaries. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  5. Hui-Chieh Loy (2008). Justification and Debate: Thoughts on Moist Moral Epistemology. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):455-471.
  6. Hui-Chieh Loy (2008). Van Norden, Bryan W., Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):343-345.
  7. Hui-Chieh Loy, Mozi (Mo-Tzu). Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  8. Benjamin Wong & Hui-Chieh Loy (2004). War and Ghosts in Mozi's Political Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 54 (3):343-363.
    : It is argued here that Mozi's critique of warfare in the chapter "Against Offensive War" ("Fei gong") cannot be fully understood without the arguments presented in the chapter "Explaining Ghosts" ("Ming gui"). For Mozi, the problem of war can only be resolved if the existence of providential ghosts can be proven. But he indicates in his arguments concerning the existence of ghosts that it is doubtful whether such a condition can be met. Consequently, despite the apparently optimistic tenor of (...)
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  9. Hui-Chieh Loy (2002). What Has J. L. Austin to Do with Confucius? International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):193-208.
    In the first chapter of Confucius: The Secular as Sacred, Herbert Fingarette argues that in the Analects Confucius holds the essence of human virtue to be a kind of magic power and this magic can be explained in terms of J. L. Austin’s analysis of the “performative utterance.” This paper attempts to explicate what Fingarette’s claims concerning magic and the “performative” amount to. I will argue that even though there is something to the underlying spirit of Fingarette’s project, he either (...)
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  10. Benjamin Wong & Hui-chieh Loy (2001). The Confucian Gentleman and the Limits of Ethical Change. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (3):209–234.
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