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David L. Hull [94]Richard T. Hull [27]Gordon Hull [21]Richard Hull [20]
Sara Chandros Hull [14]David Hull [10]Gerald Hull [10]Zbigniew Hull [9]

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Profile: Gordon Hull (University of North Carolina, Charlotte)
Profile: Gerald (Jerry) Hull (State University of New York at Binghamton)
Profile: Kathleen Hull
Profile: Abner Hull (North Carolina Central University)
Profile: George Hull (University of Cape Town)
Profile: Stephanie Hull (University of Missouri, Columbia)
  1. Richard Hull, Is There Ever a Duty to Have Sex with Someone Other Than One’s Spouse?
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  2. David L. Hull, Evolutionists Red in Tooth and Claw.
    ust-jackets are frequently adorned by quotations from famous people praising the book. At first glance, Andrew Brown's The Darwin Wars is no exception. Pithy quotations from Steve Jones, Richard Dawkins, John Maynard Smith, Stephen Jay Gould and Daniel Dennett. Who could ask for more? However, on closer inspection these quotations turn out not to be about Brown's book at all, but quotations that Brown uses in his book. Only Dennett's blurb refers to one of Brown's own publications: "What a (...)
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  3. Richard T. Hull, Autonomy, Personhood, and the Right to Psychiatric Treatment.
    In the May, 1960, issue of the American Bar Association Journal (vol. 499), Morton Birnbaum, a lawyer and physician, argued for a legal right to psychiatric treatment of the involuntarily committed mentally ill person. In the 18 years since his article appeared,, there have been several key court cases in which this concept of a right to psychiatric treatment has figured prominently and decisively. It is important to note that the language of the decisions have had at least an indirect (...)
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  4. Richard T. Hull, Dying in America.
    Good Morning! When I was asked to talk on the subject of Dying in America at a breakfast meeting, It occurred to me that I might get to make some wisecracks about how we eat, at a breakfast where we would be served croissants, butter, sausage and eggs, and berries served with Devonshire cream: certainly the most tasteful form of dying in America! Nor have we been disappointed: quiche and ham should do quite nicely. Then, after last Tuesday’s election, someone (...)
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  5. Richard T. Hull, The Alchemy of Informed Consent'.
    on the part of physicians are most welcome and not to be disputed. If widely implemented, they should substantially improve the atmosphere of relations between patients and physicians. So, what, if anything, is to be said about his diagnoses and prescriptions, other than "Right on!?".
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  6. Richard T. Hull, The Baby Fae Case: Treatment, Experiment, or Animal Abuse?
    On October 26, 1984, Dr. Leonard Bailey and the transplant team of Loma Linda University Medical Center in California operated on a five-pound baby girl born a few weeks earlier with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In babies born with this defect the left side of the heart is much smaller than the right and is unable to pump sufficient blood to sustain life for more than a few weeks. This rare defect occurs about once in every 12,000 live births; it (...)
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  7. Richard T. Hull, Whither Geology: Passive Information Source, or Pro-Active Environmentalism?
    In this age of interdisciplinary interaction, we probably owe one another disclosures of our qualifications for commenting on each other’s profession. And you might well wonder why a philosopher would be asked to address this distinguished society of professiona l geologists. So, let me give what information I can about my qualifications to talk this evening about, of all things, the ethics of water geology.
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  8. Gerald Hull, How Can Morality Be in My Interest.
    It is natural to oppose morality and self-interest; it is customary also to oppose morality to interests as such, an inclination encouraged by Kantian tradition. However, if “interest” is understood simply as what moves a person to do this rather than that, then – if persons ever actually are good and do what is right – there must be moral interests. Bradley, in posing the “Why should I be moral?” question, raises Kant-inspired objections to the possibility of moral interests qua (...)
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  9. Gerald Hull, How to Derive Morality From Hume's Maxim.
    The argument that follows has a certain air of prestidigitation about it. I attempt to show that, given a couple of innocent-seeming suppositions, it is possible to derive a positive and complete theory of normative ethics from the Humean maxim "You can't get ought from is." This seems, of course, absurd. If the reasoning isn't completely unhinged, you may be sure, the trick has to lie in those "innocent-seeming" props. And, in fact, you are right. But every argument has to (...)
     
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  10. Gerald Hull, The Eliminability of Higher Order Vagueness.
    It is generally supposed that borderline cases account for the tolerance of vague terms, yet cannot themselves be sharply bounded, leading to infinite levels of higher order vagueness. This higher order vagueness subverts any formal effort to make language precise. However, it is possible to show that tolerance must diminish at higher orders. The attempt to derive it from indiscriminability founders on a simple empirical test, and we learn instead that there is no limit to how small higher order tolerance (...)
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  11. Gerald Hull, Vagueness, Truth and Varzi.
    Is 'vague' vague? Is the meaning of 'true' vague? Is higher-order vagueness unavoidable? Is it possible to say precisely what it is to say something precisely? These questions, deeply interrelated and of fundamental importance to logic and semantics, have been addressed recently by Achille Varzi in articles focused on an ingenius attempt by Roy Sorensen ("An Argument for the Vagueness of 'Vague'") to demonstrate that 'vague' is vague.
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  12. Gerald Hull, Vagueness Without Indefiniteness.
    Contemporary discussions do not always clearly distinguish two different forms of vagueness. Sometimes focus is on the imprecision of predicates, and sometimes the indefiniteness of statements. The two are intimately related, of course. A predicate is imprecise if there are instances to which it neither definitely applies nor definitely does not apply, instances of which it is neither definitely true nor definitely false. However, indefinite statements will occur in everyday discourse only if speakers in fact apply imprecise predicates to such (...)
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  13. Gordon Hull, Digital Copyright and the Possibility of Pure Law.
    This paper attempts a theoretical discussion of effects on the legal regime of copyright induced by the change from material to digital media. Specifically, a fundamental question remains unanswered: what is the relationship between an object and a copy? A conceptually clear answer to this question has been unnecessary because it has always been possible to provide an ad hoc answer through visual inspection of an object. Authorized mechanical reproductions – authorized copies – look similar to one another, and unauthorized (...)
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  14. Gordon Hull, Fantasies of Death and Demons: Hobbes Against the Ontological Illusion.
    Hobbes is commonly taken as arguing that individuals are primarily motivated by a fear of violent death. In this paper, I argue that, for Hobbes, people come with a wide range of fears and desires; analyzing how to redirect these into the politically stabilizing fear of death is a central preoccupation of Leviathan. One of the main problems is managing what I call the “ontological illusion,” the constitutive human tendency to take presentations of the imagination as entities in the world. (...)
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  15. Gordon Hull, Geographic Source Indicators in and as Branding Culture.
    Geographic Indications (GIs) are a form of trademark protection afforded to products that are historically the product of a particular place and production process by restricting use of the name to products that actually come from the place in question; “Champagne” can only come from that region of France, for example. GIs are often proposed as a way to protect indigenous cultural products from Western appropriation: a global GI regime would ensure that “Mysore” silk sarees were produced in India, and (...)
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  16. Gordon Hull, Normative Aspects of a 'Substantive' Precautionary Principle.
    This paper discusses some of the current literature around the precautionary principle in environmental philosophy and law with reference to the possibility of transgenic food in Uganda (GMO bananas specifically). My suggestion is that the distinction between formal and substantive versions of a principle, familiar from legal theory, can be useful in imposing some conceptual clarity on aspects of debates concerning the precautionary principle. In particular, most of the negative critical response to the principle has been to formal versions of (...)
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  17. Gordon Hull, One View of the Dungeon: The Ticking Time Bomb Between Governmentality and Sovereignty.
    This paper analyzes "ticking time bomb" scenarios in the discursive legitimation of torture and other coercive interrogation techniques. Judith Butler proposes a Foucauldian framework to suggest that Adminstration policies can be read as the irruption of sovereignty within governmentality. Rereading Foucault, I suggest that the policies could equally be understood as an exercise of governmentality, i.e., the subordination of juridical law to economy. I then propose as a reconciliation of these readings that time bomb scenarios serve rhetorically to make the (...)
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  18. Richard Hull, Are Presymptomatic Carriers of Huntington's Chorea and Heterozygous Carriers of Cystic Fibrosis Genetically Diseased?
    Technological advances force redefinition of action-mandating concepts and language through complex social, political and economic tendencies that collectively determine what has been dubbed “the technological imperative.” The reverse is also true: redefinition of concepts shapes and guides the direction of technological development through shaping public beliefs and expectations. A powerful and far-reaching example of such occurred with the redefinition of “death” and the concept’s transformed relationship to transplantation technology.
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  19. Richard Hull, Almeder's Unknowable Defeater Defeated.
    Robert Almeder has argued1 that three “fourth conditions” for nondefectiveness of knowledge justification claims, proposed in the recent literature,2 are essentially similar, require modification in order to eliminate the possibility of an unknowable defeater, and, so modified, render attainment of non-basic factual knowledge impossible. Although I believe there are objections to be raised against his exposition and reduction of the three proposed fourth conditions, I wish only to raise some doubts about the supposed necessity of the modifications and then to (...)
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  20. Richard Hull, Commentary on Albini and Ketcham.
    The theme advanced and developed by Boris Albini and Gary Ketcham in two issues of the Reporter (May 7, 1987, and February 25, 1988) involve several key concepts: sentience and suffering, life and death, compassion, contradictory rights and conflicting values. I propose to recapitulate those developed themes in order to assess what has been clarified, what still remains obscure, and what has gone unaddressed. For me the issues of which they write are live ones, and my own mind is unsettled (...)
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  21. Richard Hull, Designing Humans Versus Designing for Humans: Some Ethical Issues in Genetics.
    At a meeting of the American Society for Value Inquiry in Chicago last spring, and again at a conference on biomedical ethics last fall in London, Ontario, David J. Roy, Head of the Institute for Medical Humanities, University of Montreal, described a developing situation in the biomedical technologies about which he and many of his colleagues in the profession share an enormous apprehension. The biomedical sciences have in their possession, in development, and on the drawing boards a technology that has (...)
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  22. Richard Hull, Ethics in a Democratic State.
    I bring you greetings from the United States, where its citizens have been closely following the events of the past three weeks. There has been a great change in the feelings of common American people towards the Russian people. Many have expressed their sense of identity and solidarity with the people of Moscow and St. Petersburg as they witnessed the resistance for the attempted coup. Americans have enormous respect for constitutional government as well as for democracy, and they saw the (...)
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  23. Richard Hull, Ethical Issues in Starting and Stopping End-Stage Dialysis.
    Three ethical principles currently determine both law and practice with respect to starting and stopping dialysis in end stage renal disease cases: Medical Futility, Respect for Life, and Patient Sel-determination. Even where dialysis is not medically futile, patients possessing capacity, and patients lacking capacity but with valid, functioning proxy decision-makers, self-determination is the dominant principle, in that efforts to prolong and preserve life may be set aside or not initiated at the request of the adequately informed patient or the patient’s (...)
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  24. Richard Hull, Philosophical, Ethical, and Moral Aspects of Health Care Rationing: A Review of Daniel Callahan's Setting Limits. [REVIEW]
    My assigned task in today’s colloquium is to review philosophers’ perspectives on the broad question of whether health care rationing ought to target the elderly. This is a revolutionary question, particularly in a society that is so sensitive to apparent discrimination, and the question must be approached carefully if it is to be successfully dealt with. Three subordinate questions attend this one and must be addressed in the course of answering it. The first such question has to do with (...)
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  25. Richard Hull, Philosophical Foundations of Animal Experimentation and its Critics.
    I come before you today at the invitation of your Colloquium Chair, Professor Claes Lundgren. It was his thought that a colloquium session devoted to some of the foundational questions, or presuppositions, of animal might prove interesting. Such an examination may have several aims. 1) It provides an opportunity to reflect on and review together a common activity that, in the perceptions of some concerned fellow citizens and in the history of the discipline of physiology, has had some highly questionable (...)
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  26. Richard Hull, The Alchemy of Informed Consent Revisited.
    Second, let me offer an apology for not having a handout for this talk. I do have a website that contains most of my talks and published papers, as well as various other ravings collected over thirty-plus years of ruminating, and you are each welcome to visit it and acquire for your own reading pleasure or other legitimate purposes (such as composing refutations of my foolish views) such copies as you may require. Just don’t steal my ideas and misrepresent them (...)
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  27. Richard Hull, The Effect of a Research Ethics Course on Graduate Students' Moral Reasoning.
    A quasi-experimental design was used to determine whether there are differences in sociomoral reasoning, as indicated by the Sociomoral Reflection Objective Measure-Short Form (SROM-SF), between a group of students who completed a research ethics course and a comparable control group. The SROM-SF was administered as a pre-test and post-test to both groups of students, those enrolled in the class (n=20) as well as the control group (n=18). Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) on the post-test results of the SROM-SF with the pre-test (...)
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  28. Richard Hull, The Varieties of Ethical Theories.
    There are two fundamental types of ethical theory: those based on the notion of choosing one’s actions so as to maximize the value or values to be expected as consequences of those actions (called consequentialist or teleological theories [from the Greek telos, meaning aim or purpose]; and those based on the notion of choosing one’s actions according to standards of duty or obligation that refer not to consequences but to the nature oaf actions and the motives that are held by (...)
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  29. Ron Mallon, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Tom McCoy & Jay G. Hull, Intention, Temporal Order, and Moral Judgment Forthcoming in Mind and Language.
    The traditional philosophical doctrine of double effect claims that agents’ intentions affect whether acts are morally wrong. Our behavioral study reveals that agents’ intentions affect whether acts are judged morally wrong but not whether acts are classified as killings, whereas the temporal order of good and bad effects affects whether acts are classified as killings but not whether acts are judged morally wrong. These findings suggest that the moral judgments are not based on the classifications. Our results also undermine recent (...)
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  30. James Campbell, Cornelis De Waal, Richard Hart, Vincent Colapietro, Herman De Regt, Douglas Anderson, Kathleen Hull, Catherine Legg, Lee A. Mcbride Iii & Michael L. Raposa (forthcoming). Teaching Peirce to Undergraduates. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society.
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  31. David L. Hull (forthcoming). Species, Subspecies, and Races. Social Research.
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  32. David L. Hull & S. John (forthcoming). Wilkins. 2005–. Replication. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  33. Gordon Hull (forthcoming). Coding the Dictatorship of ‘the They:’ A Phenomenological Critique of Digital Rights Management. In J. Jeremy Wisnewski Mark Sanders (ed.), Ethics and Phenomenology. Lexington Books.
    This paper uses Heidegger’s discussion of artifacts in Being and Time to motivate a phenomenological critique of Digital Rights Management regimes such as the one that allows DVDs to require one to watch commercials and copyright notices. In the first section, I briefly sketch traditional ethical approaches to intellectual property and indicate the gap that a phenomenological approach can fill. In section 2, following Heidegger’s discussion in Being and Time, I analyze DRM technologies as exemplary of the breakdown of things (...)
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  34. Kathleen Hull (forthcoming). "Body-Thinking. Semiotics:546-563.
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  35. Sara Chandros Hull, Karen Glanz, Alana Steffen & Benjamin S. Wilfond (forthcoming). Recruitment Approaches for Family Studies: Attitudes of Index Patients and Their Relatives. Irb.
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  36. Benjamin E. Berkman & Sara Chandros Hull (2014). The “Right Not to Know” in the Genomic Era: Time to Break From Tradition? American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):28-31.
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  37. Andrew John Hull (2013). Fictional Father?: Oliver Sacks and the Revalidation of Pathography. Medical Humanities 39 (2):105-114.
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  38. George Hull (2013). Reification and Social Criticism. Philosophical Papers 42 (1):49 - 77.
    Feminist philosophers and philosophers drawing on the German tradition of social philosophy have recently converged in stressing the importance of the concept of reification?first explicitly discussed by György Lukács?for the diagnosis of contemporary social and ethical problems. However, importing a theoretical framework alien to Lukács? original discussion has often led to the conflation of reification with other social and ethical problems. Here it is argued that a coherent conception of reification, free of implausible Marxist and idealist trappings, can be recovered (...)
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  39. Gordon Hull (2013). Biopolitics Is Not (Primarily) About Life: On Biopolitics, Neoliberalism, and Families. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (3):322-335.
    The emergence of topics such as reprogenetics and genetic testing for hereditary diseases attests to the continued salience of Foucault's analyses of biopolitics. His various discussions pose at least two problems for contemporary appropriation of the work. First, it is unclear what the "life" on which biopolitics operates actually refers to.1 Second, it is unclear how biopolitics relates to the economy, either in the classical form of the family/household (oikos) or in the current form of neoliberalism.2 In what follows, I (...)
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  40. Gordon Hull (2013). Biopolitics Is Not (Primarily) About Life. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (3):322-335.
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  41. Richard Hull (2013). Deprivation and Freedom: A Philosophical Enquiry. Routledge.
    Deprivation and Freedom investigates the key issue of social deprivation. It looks at how serious that issue is, what we should do about it and how we might motivate people to respond to it. It covers core areas in moral and political philosophy in new and interesting ways, presents the topical example of disability as a form of social deprivation, shows that we are not doing nearly enough for certain sections of our communities and encourages that we think differently about (...)
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  42. Justin Lowenthal & Sara Chandros Hull (2013). Framing the "Right to Withdraw" in the Use of Biospecimens for iPSC Research. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 4 (1):1-14.
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  43. Seema K. Shah, Sara Chandros Hull, Michael A. Spinner, Benjamin E. Berkman, Lauren A. Sanchez, Ruquyyah Abdul-Karim, Amy P. Hsu, Reginald Claypool & Steven M. Holland (2013). What Does the Duty to Warn Require? American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):62 - 63.
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  44. Keith Breen, Frank Canavan, Gerard Casey, Heike Felzmann, Thomas Gil, Karsten Harries, Richard Hull, Sebastian Lalla, Elizabeth Langhorne, Thomas Nisters, Felix O'Murchadha & Fran O'Rourke (2012). Politics of Practical Reasoning: Integrating Action, Discourse, and Argument. Lexington Books.
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  45. Ben Chan, Flavia M. Facio, Haley Eidem, Sara Chandros Hull, Leslie G. Biesecker & Benjamin E. Berkman (2012). Genomic Inheritances: Disclosing Individual Research Results From Whole-Exome Sequencing to Deceased Participants' Relatives. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):1-8.
    Whole-genome analysis and whole-exome analysis generate many more clinically actionable findings than traditional targeted genetic analysis. These findings may be relevant to research participants themselves as well as for members of their families. Though researchers performing genomic analyses are likely to find medically significant genetic variations for nearly every research participant, what they will find for any given participant is unpredictable. The ubiquity and diversity of these findings complicate questions about disclosing individual genetic test results. We outline an approach for (...)
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  46. Greer Donley, Sara Chandros Hull & Benjamin E. Berkman (2012). Prenatal Whole Genome Sequencing. Hastings Center Report 42 (4):28-40.
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  47. Andrew Hull (2012). Glasgow's 'Sick Society'? James Halliday, Psychosocial Medicine and Medical Holism in Britain C.1920–48. History of the Human Sciences 25 (5):73-90.
    James Lorimer Halliday (1897–1983) pioneered the development of the concept of psychosocial medicine in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. He worked in Glasgow, first as a public health doctor, and then as part of the corporatist National Health Insurance scheme. Here he learned about links between poverty, the social environment, emotional stress and psychological and physical ill-health, and about statistical tools for making such problems scientifically visible. The intellectual development of his methodologically and epistemologically integrated medicine – a hybrid (...)
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  48. Gordon Hull (2012). Robert Merges: Justifying Intellectual Property. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):169-177.
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  49. Sara Chandros Hull, Ben Chan, Leslie G. Biesecker & Benjamin E. Berkman (2012). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Genomic Inheritances: Disclosing Individual Research Results From Whole-Exome Sequencing to Deceased Participants' Relatives”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):W9-W10.
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  50. Zbigniew Hull (2012). Ekofilozofia – przedmiot i pole problemowe. Przeglad Filozoficzny - Nowa Seria 21 (3):235-248.
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