Search results for 'Human Consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Human Consciousness & O. W. Markley (1976). 1. The Importance of Guiding Images. In Erich Jantsch (ed.), Evolution and Consciousness: Human Systems in Transition. Reading Ma: Addison-Wesley. 214.score: 480.0
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  2. Alastair Hannay (1990). Human Consciousness. Routledge.score: 216.0
    CHAPTER I The Problem I have been accused of denying consciousness, but I am not conscious of having done so. Consciousness is to me a mystery, ...
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  3. Joseph F. Rychlak (1997). In Defense of Human Consciousness. American Psychological Association.score: 198.0
  4. C. Daly King (1963/1964). The States Of Human Consciousness. New Hyde Park NY: University Books.score: 198.0
     
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  5. M. L. Lonky (2003). Human Consciousness: A Systems Approach to the Mind/Brain Interaction. Journal of Mind and Behavior 24 (1):91-118.score: 198.0
     
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  6. William Leon McBride (ed.) (1997). Existentialist Ontology and Human Consciousness. Garland Pub..score: 192.0
    Existentialist Ontology and Human Consciousness The majority of the distinguished scholarly articles in this volume focus on Sartre's early philosophical work, which dealt first with imagination and the emotions, then with the critique of Husserl's notion of a transcendental ego, and finally with systematic ontology presented in his best-known book, Being and Nothingness. In addition, since his preoccupation with ontological questions and especially with the meanings of ego, self, and consciousness endured throughout his career, other essays discuss (...)
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  7. Melanie Boly, Anil K. Seth, Melanie Wilke, Paul Ingmundson, Bernard Baars, Steven Laureys, David Edelman & Naotsugu Tsuchiya (2013). Consciousness in Humans and Non-Human Animals: Recent Advances and Future Directions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 192.0
    This joint article reflects the authors’ personal views regarding noteworthy advances in the neuroscience of consciousness in the last ten years, and suggests what we feel may be promising future directions. It is based on a small conference at the Samoset Resort in Rockport, Maine, USA, in July of 2012, organized by the Mind Science Foundation of San Antonio, Texas. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of subjectivity in humans and other animals, including empirical, applied, technical and (...)
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  8. Singh Sa Singh Ar (2011). Brain-Mind Dyad, Human Experience, the Consciousness Tetrad and Lattice of Mental Operations: And Further, The Need to Integrate Knowledge From Diverse Disciplines. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):6.score: 192.0
    Brain, Mind and Consciousness are the research concerns of psychiatrists, psychologists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists and philosophers. All of them are working in different and important ways to understand the workings of the brain, the mysteries of the mind and to grasp that elusive concept called consciousness. Although they are all justified in forwarding their respective researches, it is also necessary to integrate these diverse appearing understandings and try and get a comprehensive perspective that is, hopefully, more than the (...)
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  9. Dan Lloyd (2002). Functional MRI and the Study of Human Consciousness. Journal Of Cognitive Neuroscience 14 (6):818-831.score: 186.0
    & Functional brain imaging offers new opportunities for the begin with single-subject (preprocessed) scan series, and study of that most pervasive of cognitive conditions, human consider the patterns of all voxels as potential multivariate consciousness. Since consciousness is attendant to so much encodings of phenomenal information. Twenty-seven subjects of human cognitive life, its study requires secondary analysis from the four studies were analyzed with multivariate of multiple experimental datasets. Here, four preprocessed methods, revealing analogues of phenomenal (...)
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  10. Serge Grigoriev (2012). Chauncey Wright: Theoretical Reason in a Naturalist Account of Human Consciousness. Journal of the History of Ideas 73 (4):559-582.score: 180.0
    Chauncey Wright was an early intellectual follower of Darwin, and a mentor to American pragmatists, C.S. Peirce and William James. Starting with the discussion of Wright’s interpretation of natural selection, the paper proceeds to outline the distinction he draws between theoretical (scientific) and practical consciousness and the way that this distinction plays out in his account of the development of human consciousness within the context of natural selection. Formulating the problem of reconfiguring the relationship between instrumental intelligence (...)
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  11. A. Jonker (1987). The Origin of the Human Mind: A Speculation on the Emergence of Language and Human Consciousness. Acta Biotheoretica 36 (3):129-77.score: 180.0
    The study of human evolution has attracted scientists of various disciplines, judging by the attendance of the conferences devoted to it, and by the publications concerned. In the course of years I became amazed about the seeming absence of a synthesis of the available information. This article presents an attempt to combine some results of the various publications.The study of human evolution has become particularly focussed on the emergence of language and human consciousness with respect to (...)
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  12. Mark D. Morelli (1995). The Polymorphism of Human Consciousness and the Prospects for a Lonerganian History of Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):379-402.score: 180.0
    Lonergan's account of human consciousness as polymorphic self-presence differs significantly from both the variety of contemporary reductionistic accounts and phenomenological treatments still influenced strongly by Cartesian suppositions and/or Kantian restrictions. It is argued that Lonergan's account grounds not only a critical meta-philosophy, but also provides a heuristic structure for a nuanced genetic account of philosophic differences. In this regard, Lonergan's account is claimed to be an adequate grounding for a thorough contemporary response to the Hegelian requirement that philosophers (...)
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  13. Vyacheslav Kudashov (2006). The Global Ecology of Human Consciousness. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 9:15-20.score: 180.0
    Nowadays the real threat has appeared: "thinking man" will disappear from the planet, and his place will be taken by "information consuming man." The rapidly evolving spiritually dependent consumer will turn into a completely controlled human being. A value orientation that we did not create will entirely determine all our choices and dominate our attention. Both the values and the products of mass culture are being spread among consumers as extensively as possible by mechanisms of culture manufacture, in accord (...)
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  14. Terence A. McGoldrick (2012). The Spirituality of Human Consciousness: A Catholic Evaluation of Some Current Neuro-Scientific Interpretations. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):483-501.score: 180.0
    Catholic theology’s traditional understanding of the spiritual nature of the human person begins with the idea of a rational soul and human mind that is made manifest in free will—the spiritual experience of the act of consciousness and cause of all human arts. The rationale for this religion-based idea of personhood is key to understanding ethical dilemmas posed by modern research that applies a more empirical methodology in its interpretations about the cause of human (...). Applications of these beliefs about the body/soul composite to the theory of evolution and to discoveries in neuroscience, paleoanthropology, as well as to recent animal intelligence studies, can be interpreted from this religious and philosophical perspective, which argues for the human soul as the unifying cause of the person’s unique abilities. Free will and consciousness are at the nexus of the mutual influence of body and soul upon one another in the traditional Catholic view, that argues for a spiritual dimension to personality that is on a par with the physical metabolic processes at play. Therapies that affect consciousness are ethically problematic, because of their implications for free will and human dignity. Studies of resilience, as an example, argue for the greater, albeit limited, role of the soul’s conscious choices in healing as opposed to metabolic or physical changes to the brain alone. (shrink)
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  15. Andrew Beards (1994). John Searle and Human Consciousness. Heythrop Journal 35 (3):281-295.score: 174.0
  16. Merlin Donald (2001). A Mind So Rare: The Evolution of Human Consciousness. W.W. Norton.score: 174.0
  17. Nicholas Maxwell (2001). The Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will and Evolution. Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.score: 174.0
    This book tackles the problem of how we can understand our human world embedded in the physical universe in such a way that justice is done both to the richness...
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  18. James A. Russell (2005). Emotion in Human Consciousness is Built on Core Affect. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):26-42.score: 168.0
  19. Michael Pitman (2003). Consciousness Studies: Research Prospects in the ‘Cradle of Human Consciousness’. Alternation 10 (1):271-291.score: 168.0
    The paper introduces the field of consciousness studies to an audience outside of philosophy and the cognitive sciences, using the work of the late David Brooks as a starting point. Brooks' account of consciousness, and the cognitive and evolutionary significance of for-the-organism properties, are discussed. Brooks' account is evaluated in the light of the debate over conscious inessentialism; and alternative lines for developing Brooks' account are proposed, drawing on the work of Gerald Edelman.
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  20. Ralph D. Ellis (2013). Neuroscience as a Human Science: Integrating Phenomenology and Empiricism in the Study of Action and Consciousness. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (4):491-507.score: 168.0
    This paper considers where contemporary neuroscience leaves us in terms of how human consciousness fits into the material world, and whether consciousness is reducible to merely mechanical physical systems, or on the contrary whether consciousness is a self-organizing system that can in a sense use the brain for its own purposes. The paper discusses how phenomenology can be integrated with new findings about “neural plasticity” to yield new approaches to the mind–body problem and the place of (...)
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  21. P. K. Johnston (1997). Battle Within: Shakespeare's Brain and the Nature of Human Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (4):365-73.score: 168.0
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  22. Richard McDonough (2000). Review of John Cornwall's Consciousness and Human Identity. [REVIEW] Metascience 9 (2):238-245.score: 168.0
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  23. Roy F. Baumeister, E. J. Masicampo & C. Nathan DeWall (2011). Arguing, Reasoning, and the Interpersonal (Cultural) Functions of Human Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):74-74.score: 164.0
    Our recent work suggests that (1) the purpose of human conscious thought is participation in social and cultural groups, and (2) logical reasoning depends on conscious thought. These mesh well with the argument theory of reasoning. In broader context, the distinctively human traits are adaptations for culture and inner processes serve interpersonal functions.
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  24. Michael A. Arbib (2001). Co-Evolution of Human Consciousness and Language. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:195-220.score: 162.0
  25. Ernest Keen (2000). Chemicals for the Mind: Psychopharmacology and Human Consciousness. Greenwood Publishing Group.score: 162.0
    Keen provides a critical appraisal of psychopharmacology, including its philosophical assumptions, its professional practice, and its practical results.
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  26. Rodolfo Llinas (2008). Of Self and Self Awareness: The Basic Neuronal Circuit in Human Consciousness and the Generation of Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):64-74.score: 162.0
    The fascination of Velasquez's painting Las Meninas stems largely from the ambiguous relationship between the painting as a whole, viewed by a single perceiver, and the variety of different perceptual viewpoints it invites. This situation resonates strongly with a central puzzle in the study of consciousness: the apparent unity of perceptual experience despite multiple sense modalities. Understanding more of this latter might help to explain the way we respond to the painting.
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  27. Jeffrey W. Cooney & Michael S. Gazzaniga (2003). Neurological Disorders and the Structure of Human Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):161-165.score: 162.0
  28. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran (2004). A Brief Tour of Human Consciousness: From Impostor Poodles to Purple Numbers. Pearson Professional.score: 162.0
  29. T. Kitamura (2002). What is the Self of a Robot? On a Consciousness Architecture for a Mobile Robot as a Model of Human Consciousness. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins. 33--231.score: 162.0
  30. Charles D. Laughlin (1990). Brain, Symbol & Experience: Toward a Neurophenomenology of Human Consciousness. New Science Library.score: 162.0
  31. F. [from old catalog] De Havas (1946). The Equilibrium Theory of the Human Consciousness. Glasgow, M. D. Macrae;.score: 162.0
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  32. N. Herbert (1993). Elemental Mind: Human Consciousness and the New Physics. Dutton.score: 162.0
  33. Thomas Natsoulas (2006). On the Temporal Continuity of Human Consciousness: Is James's Firsthand Description, After All, "Inept"? Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (2):121-148.score: 162.0
     
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  34. Robert E. Ornstein (ed.) (1974). The Nature of Human Consciousness: A Book of Readings. Viking Press.score: 162.0
  35. Lance Storm & Michael A. Thalbourne (2006). The Survival of Human Consciousness: Essays on the Possibility of Life After Death. McFarland.score: 162.0
  36. Raymond Tallis (1991). The Explicit Animal: A Defence of Human Consciousness. Macmillan Academic and Professional.score: 162.0
  37. Pirooz Fatoorchi (2008). Avicenna on the Human Self‐Consciousness. In Mehmet Mazak & Nevzat Ozkaya (eds.), International Ibn Sina Symposium Papers (vol.2). FSF Printing House.score: 156.0
    In recent years, philosophers have shown a rapidly increasing interest in the problem of consciousness and it is arguably the central issue in current interdisciplinary discussions about the mind. Any convincing theory of consciousness has to account for the perplexing aspects of human self-consciousness. This paper deals with Ibn Sina’s view on the human self-consciousness with special reference to his well-known “Flying Man” thought experiment. In a brief comparative discussion, we will consider some of (...)
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  38. Micah Allen & Gary Williams (2011). Consciousness, Plasticity, and Connectomics: The Role of Intersubjectivity in Human Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 2 (20).score: 156.0
    Consciousness is typically construed as being explainable purely in terms of either private, raw feels or higher-order, reflective representations. In contrast to this false dichotomy, we propose a new view of consciousness as an interactive, plastic phenomenon open to sociocultural influence. We take up our account of consciousness from the observation of radical cortical neuroplasticity in human development. Accordingly, we draw upon recent research on macroscopic neural networks, including the “default mode”, to illustrate cases in which (...)
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  39. Helmut Wautischer, The Pursuit of Autonomy. Interdisciplinary Observations to Human Consciousness.score: 156.0
    In consciousness research, two rival sets of theories can be recognized: (A) Scientific material interpretations of consciousness are based on axioms that view consciousness in the context of highly advanced intentional processing of information in which subject-object relations evolve, and (B) humanistic interpretations of consciousness are based on axioms that view consciousness in the context of, say, "centered pulsations" that enable a conscious agent to act from his or her center of awareness. In this paper (...)
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  40. James B. Miller (2012). Haunted by the Ghost in the Machine. Commentary on “The Spirituality of Human Consciousness: A Catholic Evaluation of Some Current Neuro-Scientific Interpretations”. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):503-507.score: 156.0
    Metaphysical and epistemological dualism informs much contemporary discussion of the relationships of science and religion, in particular in relation to the neurosciences and the religious understanding of the human person. This dualism is a foundational artifact of modern culture; however, contemporary scientific research and historical theological scholarship encourage a more holistic view wherein human personhood is most fittingly understood as an emergent phenomenon of, but not simply reducible to, evolutionary and developmental neurobiology.
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  41. Harry Hunt (2009). A Cognitive-Developmental Theory of Human Consciousness: Incommensurable Cognitive Domains of Purpose and Cause as a Conjoined Ontology of Inherent Human Unbalance. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (9):27-54.score: 156.0
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  42. Micah Allen and Gary Williams (2011). Consciousness, Plasticity, and Connectomics: The Role of Intersubjectivity in Human Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 156.0
    Consciousness is typically construed as being explainable purely in terms of either private, raw feels or higher-order, reflective representations. In contrast to this false dichotomy, we propose a new view of consciousness as an interactive, plastic phenomenon open to sociocultural influence. We take up our account of consciousness from the observation of radical cortical neuroplasticity in human development. Accordingly, we draw upon recent research on macroscopic neural networks, including the “default mode”, to illustrate cases in which (...)
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  43. John V. Canfield (2007). Becoming Human: The Development of Language, Self, and Self-Consciousness. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 156.0
    This book is a philosophical examination of the main stages in our journey from hominid to human. It deals with the nature and origin of language, the self, self-consciousness, and the religious ideal of a return to Eden. It approaches these topics through a philosophical anthropology derived from the later writings of Wittgenstein. The result is an account of our place in nature consistent with both a hard-headed empiricism and a this-worldy but religiously significant mysticism.
     
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  44. Richard J. Davidson & Julian M. Davidson (1980). Introduction: The Scientific Study of Human Consciousness in Psychobiological Perspective. In. In J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.), The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum. 1--10.score: 156.0
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  45. L. Gabora (2000). From a Double Aspect Theory of Information to Human Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S78 - S78.score: 156.0
     
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  46. Timo Jarvilehto (2000). Machines as Part of Human Consciousness and Culture. Consciousness and Emotion 1:00-00.score: 156.0
  47. D. Nichols & B. Chemel (2011). LSD and the Serotonin System's Effects on Human Consciousness. In E. Cardeña & M. Winkelman (ed.), Altering Consciousness. Multidisciplinary Perspectives. Praeger.. 122--146.score: 156.0
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  48. Richard Stevenson & Tuki Attuquayefio (2013). Human Olfactory Consciousness and Cognition: Its Unusual Features May Not Result From Unusual Functions but From Limited Neocortical Processing Resources. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 156.0
    Human and animal olfactory perception is shaped both by functional demands and by various environmental constraints seemingly peculiar to chemical stimuli. These demands and constraints may have generated a sensory system that is cognitively distinct from the major senses. In this article we identify these various functional demands and constraints, and examine whether they can be used to account for olfaction’s unique cognitive features on a case-by-case basis. We then use this as grounds to argue that specific conscious processes (...)
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  49. Daniel C. Dennett (1982). How to Study Human Consciousness Empirically, or, Nothing Comes to Mind. Synthese 53 (2):159-80.score: 150.0
  50. Matthew Donald (1995). The Neurobiology of Human Consciousness: An Evolutionary Approach. Neuropsychologia 33:1087-1102.score: 150.0
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