Search results for 'Human Rights Abuses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association (2009). Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights (1999). In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  2.  7
    Andrew Perechocky (2014). Los Torturadores Medicos: Medical Collusion With Human Rights Abuses in Argentina, 1976–1983. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (4):539-551.
    Medical collaboration with authoritarian regimes historically has served to facilitate the use of torture as a tool of repression and to justify atrocities with the language of public health. Because scholarship on medicalized killing and biomedicalist rhetoric and ideology is heavily focused on Nazi Germany, this article seeks to expand the discourse to include other periods in which medicalized torture occurred, specifically in Argentina from 1976 to 1983, when the country was ruled by the Proceso de Reorganización Nacional military regime. (...)
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  3.  5
    Kurt Beurmann (2008). Human Rights in Kosovo. Human Rights Review 9 (1):41-54.
    The emotions surrounding the question of Kosovo’s future owe their intensity to the long history of human rights abuses in the province. The years 1945–1966 and 1987–1999, in particular, saw harsh repression of local Albanians and a systematic favoring of local Serbs. Since June 1999, the province has been under international supervision, and, in this period, Serbs complain that they have been the victims of repeated acts of violence at the hands of Albanians. This article provides an (...)
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  4.  12
    Rebecca Evans (2005). Seeking Retribution for Human Rights Abuses: The Role of Truth Commissions. Human Rights Review 7 (1):127-134.
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  5.  3
    Isebill V. Gruhn (1999). Human Rights Abuses in Africa: Local Problems, Global Obligations. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 1 (1):65-77.
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  6.  4
    Rowland Brucken (2013). The Costs of Justice: How New Leaders Respond to Previous Human Rights Abuses by Brian K. Grodsky. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (2):157-158.
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  7.  3
    Ereshnee Naidu & John Torpey (2011). Reparations for Human Rights Abuses. In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge 476.
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  8. Rowland Brucken (2013). The Costs of Justice: How New Leaders Respond to Previous Human Rights Abuses by Brian K. Grodsky: Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2010 (). Human Rights Review 14 (2):157-158.
     
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  9.  10
    S. Prakash Sethi, David B. Lowry, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova (2011). Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc.: An Innovative Voluntary Code of Conduct to Protect Human Rights, Create Employment Opportunities, and Economic Development of the Indigenous People. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):1-30.
    Environmental degradation and extractive industry are inextricably linked, and the industry’s adverse impact on air, water, and ground resources has been exacerbated with increased demand for raw materials and their location in some of the more environmentally fragile areas of the world. Historically, companies have managed to control calls for regulation and improved, i.e., more expensive, mining technologies by (a) their importance in economic growth and job creation or (b) through adroit use of their economic power and bargaining leverage against (...)
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  10.  1
    Rowland Brucken (forthcoming). Human Rights and the Abuses of History by Samuel Moyn. Human Rights Review.
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  11.  3
    William Seltzer & Margo Anderson (2001). The Dark Side of Numbers: The Role of Population Data Systems in Human Rights Abuses. Social Research 68.
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  12.  9
    C. Howard (1994). Medicine Betrayed: The Participation of Doctors in Human Rights Abuses. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):61-62.
  13.  10
    Angela Rho (forthcoming). North Korea: Extreme Human Rights Abuses. Ethics.
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  14. David J. Rothman (2006). Trust is Not Enough: Bringing Human Rights to Medicine. New York Review Books.
    Addresses the issues at the heart of international medicine and social responsibility. A number of international declarations have proclaimed that health care is a fundamental human right. But if we accept this broad commitment, how should we concretely define the state’s responsibility for the health of its citizens? Although there is growing debate over this issue, there are few books for general readers that provide engaging accounts of critical incidents, practices, and ideas in the field of human (...), health care, and medicine. Included in the book are case studies of such issues as AIDS among orphans in Romania, organ trafficking, prison conditions, health care rationing, medical research in the third world, and South Africa’s constitutionally guaranteed right of access to health care. It uses these topics to address themes of protection of vulnerable populations, equity and fairness in delivering competent medical care, informed consent and the free flow of information, and state responsibility for ensuring physical, mental, and social well-being. (shrink)
     
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  15.  3
    James C. Franklin (2014). Human Rights Contention in Latin America: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 15 (2):139-158.
    This paper reports original data on contentious challenges, especially protests, focused on human rights in seven Latin American countries from 1981 to 1995. An analysis reveals that human rights contentious challenges are most prevalent where human rights abuses are worse and authoritarianism is present and in countries that are more urbanized. However, the incidence of such human rights contentious challenges is not related to the number of human rights organizations (...)
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  16.  11
    Björn Fasterling & Geert Demuijnck (2013). Human Rights in the Void? Due Diligence in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):799-814.
    The ‘Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights’ (Principles) that provide guidance for the implementation of the United Nations’ ‘Protect, Respect and Remedy’ framework (Framework) will probably succeed in making human rights matters more customary in corporate management procedures. They are likely to contribute to higher levels of accountability and awareness within corporations in respect of the negative impact of business activities on human rights. However, we identify tensions between the idea that the respect (...)
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  17.  16
    Matthew Murphy & Jordi Vives (2013). Perceptions of Justice and the Human Rights Protect, Respect, and Remedy Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):781-797.
    Human rights declarations are instruments used to introduce universal standards of ethics. The UN’s Protect, Respect, and Remedy Framework (Ruggie, Protect, respect, and remedy: A Framework for business and human rights. UN Doc A/HRC/8/5, 2008; Guiding principles on business and human rights: Implementing the United Nations “Protect, Respect, and Remedy” framework. UN Doc A/HRC/17/31, 2011) intends to provide guidance for corporate behavior in regard to human rights. This article applies concepts from the (...)
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  18.  30
    Sumner B. Twiss (2011). Global Ethics and Human Rights: A Reflection. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):204-222.
    This paper examines the contributions that the international human rights community can make to the definition and framing of a practically effective global ethic, especially in light of ongoing concerns about social and economic justice, environmental issues, and systematic abuses of vulnerable populations. The principal argument is that the human rights movement in all of its dimensions (moral, legal, political) provides the pivotal foundation for a practicable global ethic now and for the foreseeable future. Evidence (...)
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  19.  5
    Saulius Katuoka & Monika Dailidaitė (2012). Responsibility of Transnational Corporations for Human Rights Violations: Deficiencies of International Legal Background and Solutions Offered by National and Regional Legal Tools. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1301-1316.
    The article deals with the question how transnational corporations can bear direct responsibility for human rights abuses they commit by analysing the deficiencies of the current international legal background with respect to human rights and transnational corporations, and the solutions offered by national and regional legal tools. By establishing that current international law is incapable of reducing or compensating for governance gaps, the case law analysis shows that the litigation system under the Alien Tort Claims (...)
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  20.  12
    Makoto Usami (2001). Retroactive Justice: Trials for Human Rights Violations Under a Prior Regime. In Burton M. Leiser & Tom D. Campbell (eds.), Human Rights in Philosophy and Practice. Ashgate 423--442.
    In the transition from a repressive to a democratic society, the successor government faces the problem of how to deal with grave human rights violations such as killings and torture committed under its predecessor. This paper analyzes the dilemma a new government may encounter when it attempts to prosecute and punish those found responsible. On one hand, trials of chargeable officers may be able to prevent human rights abuses in the future and to facilitate instituting (...)
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  21. Oktay Tanrisever (2001). Russian Nationalism and Moscow's Violations of Human Rights in the Second Chechen War. Human Rights Review 2 (3):117-127.
    The use of nationalist discourse in the second Chechen War and the Russian violations of human rights have reconfigured Russian politics along a more nationalist direction. Certainly, this is a setback to Russia’s democratic transition process, which has been already complicated by pragmatic politicians seeking to maximize their power and wealth at the expense of masses.In the initial stage of the post-Soviet transition in Russia, the rhetoric of the international community held that Russia needed to be transformed into (...)
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  22.  27
    Peter Muchlinski (2012). Implementing the New UN Corporate Human Rights Framework. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):145-177.
    The UN Framework on Human Rights and Business comprises the State’s duty to protect human rights, the corporate responsibility to respect human rights, and the duty to remedy abuses. This paper focuses on the corporate responsibility to respect. It considers how to overcome obstacles, arising out of national and international law, to the development of a legally binding corporate duty to respect human rights. It is argued that the notion of (...) rights due diligence will lead to the creation of binding legal duties and that principles of corporate and tort law can be adapted to this end. Furthermore, recent legal developmentsaccept an “enlightened shareholder value” approach allowing corporate managers to consider human rights issues when making decisions. The responsibility torespect involves adaptation of shareholder based corporate governance towards a more stakeholder oriented approach and could lead to the development of a new, stakeholder based, corporate model. (shrink)
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  23.  25
    L. London & G. McCarthy (1998). Teaching Medical Students on the Ethical Dimensions of Human Rights: Meeting the Challenge in South Africa. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):257-262.
    SETTING: Previous health policies in South Africa neglected the teaching of ethics and human rights to health professionals. In April 1995, a pilot course was run at the University of Cape Town in which the ethical dimensions of human rights issues in South Africa were explored. OBJECTIVES: To compare knowledge and attitudes of participating students with a group of control students. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: Seventeen fourth-year medical students who participated in the course and 13 (...)
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  24.  11
    Garrett Albert Duncan (2000). Race and Human Rights Violations in the United States: Considerations for Human Rights and Moral Educators. Journal of Moral Education 29 (2):183-201.
    In the previous article Mary M. Brabeck and Lauren Rogers called for dialogue between moral educators of North America and human rights educators of South America, noting that the latter group has much to offer the former for its work in the United States. In what follows, I posit that moral educators can learn not only from South American human rights workers but also from North Americans who have challenged US human rights violations, especially (...)
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  25.  41
    Gail Evelyn Linsenbard (1999). Beauvoir, Ontology, and Women’s Human Rights. Hypatia 14 (4):145-162.
    : Simone de Beauvoir offers an important contribution to discourse on universal human rights. Her descriptive ontology of persons as free, interdependent, and sit-uated in a world that offers resistance brings the discussion of human rights to a new level that also converges with some African perspectives. I claim that Beauvoir is able to defend universal human rights and, moreover, justify moral action against human rights abuses by showing the existential priority (...)
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  26.  14
    Saladin Meckled-Garcia (2008). How to Think About the Problem of Non-State Actors and Human Rights. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 11:41-60.
    International Human Rights Law is clear in holding only states or state-like entities responsible for human rights abuses, yet activists and philosophers alike do not see any rational basis for this restriction in responsibility. Multi-national corporations, individuals and a whole array of other 'non‐state actors' are capable of harming vital human interests just as much as states, so why single-out the latter as human rights-responsible agents? In this paper I distinguish two ways (...)
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  27.  17
    Nicholas Owen (ed.) (2003). Human Rights, Human Wrongs: Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2001. OUP Oxford.
    This book, based on the prestigious Oxford Amnesty Lecture series, focuses on human rights abuses, and the ways in which they are interpreted. The collection includes contributions by Tzvetan Todorov, Michael Ignatieff, Peter Singer, Gitta Sereny, Susan Sontag, and Eva Hoffman, with commentaries on their essays by Niall Fergusson, Timothy Garton Ash, John Broome, Hermione Lee and others.
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  28.  23
    Jennifer Nedelsky, Communities of Judgment and Human Rights.
    The debates over 'universal' human rights versus alleged abuses in the name of culture and tradition are best understood as conflicts between different communities of judgment. This article attempts to respond to the pressing need for an adequate theory of the role of judgment in order to address these debates. Using Hannah Arendt’s work on judgment as a starting point, the article tackles the problems and possibilities that arise out of Arendt’s view that judgment relies on a (...)
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  29. Philip Alston & Sarah Knuckey (eds.) (2016). The Transformation of Human Rights Fact-Finding. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Fact-finding is at the heart of human rights advocacy, and is often at the center of international controversies about alleged government abuses. In recent years, human rights fact-finding has greatly proliferated and become more sophisticated and complex, while also being subjected to stronger scrutiny from governments. Nevertheless, despite the prominence of fact-finding, it remains strikingly under-studied and under-theorized. Too little has been done to bring forth the assumptions, methodologies, and techniques of this rapidly developing field, (...)
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  30. Daniel E. Lee & Elizabeth J. Lee (2012). Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization. Cambridge University Press.
    Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization provides a balanced, thoughtful discussion of the globalization of the economy and the ethical considerations inherent in the many changes it has prompted. The book's introduction maps out the philosophical foundations for constructing an ethic of globalization, taking into account both traditional and contemporary sources. These ideals are applied to four specific test cases: the ethics of investing in China, the case study of the Firestone company's presence in Liberia, free-trade and (...)
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  31. Daniel E. Lee & Elizabeth J. Lee (2010). Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization. Cambridge University Press.
    Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization provides a balanced, thoughtful discussion of the globalization of the economy and the ethical considerations inherent in the many changes it has prompted. The book's introduction maps out the philosophical foundations for constructing an ethic of globalization, taking into account both traditional and contemporary sources. These ideals are applied to four specific test cases: the ethics of investing in China, the case study of the Firestone company's presence in Liberia, free-trade and (...)
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  32. Sharon Sliwinski (2011). Human Rights in Camera. University of Chicago Press.
    From the fundamental rights proclaimed in the American and French declarations of independence to the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Hannah Arendt’s furious critiques, the definition of what it means to be human has been hotly debated. But the history of human rights—and their abuses—is also a richly illustrated one. Following this picture trail, _Human Rights In Camera_ takes an innovative approach by examining the visual images that have accompanied (...) rights struggles and the passionate responses people have had to them. Sharon Sliwinski considers a series of historical events, including the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and the Holocaust, to illustrate that universal human rights have come to be imagined through aesthetic experience. The circulation of images of distant events, she argues, forms a virtual community between spectators and generates a sense of shared humanity. Joining a growing body of scholarship about the cultural forces at work in the construction of human rights, _Human Rights In Camera_ is a novel take on this potent political ideal. (shrink)
     
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  33. James Griffin (2008). On Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
    It is our job now - the job of this book - to influence and develop the unsettled discourse of human rights so as to complete the incomplete idea.
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  34.  25
    Claudio Tamburrini (2010). Trading Truth for Justice? Res Publica 16 (2):153-167.
    In this article I pursue two aims. First I advance an internal critique of hard-core retribution as it is usually advanced by victims of human rights violations. The focus of this penal approach on submitting all the military personnel guilty of human rights violations to harsh punishments risks jeopardizing the (clearly retributive) demand of punishing all those involved in the abuses. Particularly when extensive time has elapsed after the misdeeds, the most rational policy seems to (...)
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  35. Pablo Gilabert (2015). Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Power. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press 196-213.
    This paper explores the connections between human rights, human dignity, and power. The idea of human dignity is omnipresent in human rights discourse, but its meaning and point is not always clear. It is standardly used in two ways, to refer to a normative status of persons that makes their treatment in terms of human rights a proper response, and a social condition of persons in which their human rights are (...)
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  36. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Reflections on Human Rights and Power. In Adam Etinson (ed.), Human Rights: Moral or Political? Oxford University Press
    Human rights are particularly relevant in contexts in which there are significant asymmetries of power, but where these asymmetries exist the human rights project turns out to be especially difficult to realize. The stronger can use their disproportionate power both to threaten others’ human rights and to frustrate attempts to secure their fulfillment. They may even monopolize the international discussion as to what human rights are and how they should be implemented. This (...)
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  37.  73
    S. Matthew Liao (forthcoming). Human Rights as Fundamental Conditions for a Good Life. In Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press
    What grounds human rights? How do we determine that something is a genuine human right? In this paper, I offer a new answer: human beings have human rights to what I call the fundamental conditions for pursuing a good life. These are certain goods, capacities and options that human beings qua human beings need whatever else they (qua individuals) might need in order to pursue a characteristically good human life. I call (...)
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  38.  4
    Sidney Tarrow (2010). Outsiders Inside and Insiders Outside: Linking Transnational and Domestic Public Action for Human Rights. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (2):171-182.
    “Is the traditional divide between domestic and international politics breaking down?” and, if so, with what effects on transnational human rights activism? This paper argues that small and focused transnational campaigns can have dramatic short-term results that its large-scale and bureaucratic cousins are too slow-moving to effect; it illustrates the importance of often-fleeting political opportunities in opening windows for non-state public action; and using four different transnational campaigns, it shows how loosely coupled mechanisms and processes link domestic and (...)
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  39.  10
    Ivar Kolstad (2009). Human Rights and Assigned Duties: Implications for Corporations. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (4):569-582.
    Human rights imply duties. The question is, duties for whom? Without a well-defined scheme for assigning duties correlative to human rights, these rights remain illusory. This paper develops core elements of a general scheme of duty assignment and studies the implications for corporations. A key distinction in such an assignment is between unconditional and conditional duties. Unconditional duties apply to every agent regardless of the conduct of others. Conditional duties reflect a division of moral labour (...)
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  40.  84
    Irene Istiningsih Hadiprayitno (2010). Defensive Enforcement: Human Rights in Indonesia. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (3):373-399.
    The objective of the article is to examine the human rights enforcement in Indonesian legal and political system. This is done by studying the legal basis of human rights, the process of proliferation of human rights discourse, and the actual controversies of human rights enforcement. The study has the effect of highlighting some of the immense deficits in ensuring that violations are treated under judicial procedure and the protection of human (...) is available and accessible for victims. The author inevitably came into a conclusion that the openness of legal and political arenas for human rights discourses is not followed with a tangible impact on the entitlement positions of the people. The problems of the weak institutions and the unenthusiastic enforcement show that, in Indonesia, human rights are formally adopted as a political strategy to avoid substantial implementation. (shrink)
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  41.  5
    Robin Redhead & Nick Turnbull (2011). Towards a Study of Human Rights Practitioners. Human Rights Review 12 (2):173-189.
    The expansion of human rights provisions has produced an increasing number of human rights practitioners and delineated human rights as a field of its own. Questions of who is practicing human rights and how they practice it have become important. This paper considers the question of human rights practice and the agency of practitioners, arguing that practice should not be conceived as the application of philosophy, but instead approached from a (...)
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  42.  67
    David Miller (2013). Border Regimes and Human Rights. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 7 (1):1-23.
    This article argues that there is no human right to cross borders without impediment. Receiving states, however, must recognize the procedural rights of those unable to protect their human rights in the place where they currently reside. Asylum claims must be properly investigated, and in the event that the state declines to admit them as refugees, it must ensure that the third country to which they are transferred can protect their rights. Both procedural and substantive (...)
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  43.  78
    Pablo Gilabert (2013). The Capability Approach and the Debate Between Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. A Critical Survey. Human Rights Review 14 (4):299-325.
    This paper provides a critical exploration of the capability approach to human rights (CAHR) with the specific aim of developing its potential for achieving a synthesis between “humanist” or “naturalistic” and “political” or “practical” perspectives in the philosophy of human rights. Section II presents a general strategy for achieving such a synthesis. Section III provides an articulation of the key insights of CAHR (its focus on actual realizations given diverse circumstances, its pluralism of grounds, its emphasis (...)
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  44.  8
    Veronika Haász (2013). The Role of National Human Rights Institutions in the Implementation of the UN Guiding Principles. Human Rights Review 14 (3):165-187.
    National human rights institutions (NHRIs) are key domestic mechanisms for promotion and protection of human rights. The institutions' broad mandate, competencies, and special status between state and nonstate actors on the one hand, and special status between the national and international levels on the other hand enable them to engage effectively in the field of business and human rights. Since 2009, NHRIs have been engaging with the international human rights system in order (...)
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  45.  4
    Claudia Messina & Liliana Jacott (2013). An Exploratory Study of Human Rights Knowledge: A Sample of Kindergarten and Elementary School Pre-Service Teachers in Spain. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (3):213-230.
    This study aims to explore the level of information and knowledge 150 Spanish kindergarten and elementary school teachers in pre-service training have about human rights. We compared two groups of students: students with no specific training and students with specific training (the students with specific training study with the new training teaching programme that includes a compulsory subject related to citizenship education). The contents are organized around three thematic areas. Human rights are included in the first (...)
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  46.  31
    Thaddeus Metz (2014). African Values and Human Rights as Two Sides of the Same Coin: Reply to Oyowe. African Human Rights Law Journal 14 (2):306-21.
    In an article previously published in this Journal, Anthony Oyowe critically engages with my attempt to demonstrate how the human rights characteristic of South Africa’s Constitution can be grounded on a certain interpretation of Afro-communitarian values that are often associated with talk of ‘ubuntu’. Drawing on recurrent themes of human dignity and communal relationships in the sub-Saharan tradition, I have advanced a moral-philosophical principle that I argue entails and plausibly explains a wide array of individual rights (...)
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  47.  30
    Nicolas Rost (2011). Human Rights Violations, Weak States, and Civil War. Human Rights Review 12 (4):417-440.
    This study examines the role of human rights violations as a harbinger of civil wars to come, as well as the links between repression, state weakness, and conflict. Human rights violations are both part of the escalating process that may end in civil war and can contribute to an escalation of conflict to civil war, particularly in weak states. The role of government repression and state weakness in leading to civil war is tested empirically. The results (...)
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  48.  4
    Julie Harrelson-Stephens & Rhonda L. Callaway (2009). “The Empire Strikes Back”: The US Assault on the International Human Rights Regime. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (3):431-452.
    We argue that the post-9/11 environment has amounted to a substantive change in the longstanding United States relationship with the international human rights regime. We identify three distinct phases of that relationship, noting that in the most recent phase, since 9/11, the US has moved from passive support of the international human rights regime to a direct attack of that regime. Realist and liberal regime theories suggest that the human rights regime is relatively weak, (...)
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  49.  28
    Daniel Viehoff (2013). The Right Against Interference: Human Rights and Legitimate Authority. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 7 (1):25-46.
    Among the functions of state borders is to delineate a domain within which outsiders may normally not interfere. But the human rights practice that has sprung up in recent decades has imposed significant limits on a state’s right against interference. This article considers the connection between human rights on the one hand and justified interference in the internal affairs of states on the other. States, this article argues, have a right against interference if and because they (...)
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  50.  2
    Simon Caney (2010). Climate Change, Human Rights and Moral Thresholds. In Stephen Humphreys (ed.), Human Rights and Climate Change. Cambridge University Press 69-90..
    This essay examines the relationship between climate change and human rights. It argues that climate change is unjust, in part, because it jeopardizes several core rights – including the right to life, the right to food and the right to health. It then argues that adopting a human rights framework has six implications for climate policies. To give some examples, it argues that this helps us to understand the concept of (...)
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