Search results for 'Human acts History of doctrines' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ralph McInerny (1992). Aquinas on Human Action: A Theory of Practice. Catholic University Press.
     
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  2.  1
    Laura Lázaro & Moisès Esteban-Guitart (2014). Acts of Shared Intentionality. In Search of Uniquely Human Thinking A Natural History of Human Thinking, Michael Tomasello. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press. 2014. Xi-178 Pp. [REVIEW] Ethos 42 (4):E10-E13.
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  3.  30
    Peter Langford (1986). Modern Philosophies of Human Nature: Their Emergence From Christian Thought. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic.
    Chapter 1 : Introduction General Argument My aim is to survey some of the most influential philosophical writers on human nature from the time that ...
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  4.  9
    Everett Ferguson (ed.) (1951). Doctrines of God and Christ in the Early Church. Garland.
    An integrated overview of history The volume in this series are arranged topically to cover biography, literature, doctrines, practices, institutions, worship, missions, and daily life. Archaeology and art as well as writings are drawn on to illuminate the Christian movement in its early centuries. Ample attention is also given to the relation of Christianity to pagan thought and life, to the Roman state, to Judaism, and to doctrines and practices that came to be judged as heretical or (...)
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  5. Hans Christian Günther & Andrea A. Robiglio (eds.) (2010). The European Image of God and Man: A Contribution to the Debate on Human Rights. Brill.
     
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  6.  52
    James Good (2000). The Historical Imagination in the Human Sciences Introduction: The Historical Imagination and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):97-101.
    The historical imagination, as Hayden White has reminded us, is not singular;\nit is manifest in many forms (White, 1973). Not surprisingly, this diversity\nis reflected within the pages of History of the Human Sciences and in the four papers that follow. Indeed, from its inception, the journal has sought to\npromote a variety of styles of writing, representing the many voices that have\nan interest in the human sciences and their history.\nIn the opening article, Roger Smith suggests that a (...)
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  7.  65
    Joseph Margolis (2011). Toward a Theory of Human History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):245-273.
    I show the sense in which the concept of history as a human science affects our theory of the natural sciences and, therefore, our theory of the unity of the physical and human sciences. The argument proceeds by way of reviewing the effect of the Darwinian contribution regarding teleologism and of post-Darwinian paleonanthropology on the transformation of the primate members of Homo sapiens into societies of historied selves. The strategy provides a novel way of recovering the unity (...)
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  8.  28
    Roger Smith (1997). History and the History of the Human Sciences: What Voice? History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):22-39.
    This paper discusses the historical voice in the history of the human sci ences. I address the question, 'Who speaks?', as a question about disci plinary identities and conventions of writing - identities and conventions which have the appearance of conditions of knowledge, in an area of activity where academic history and the history of science or intellectual history meet. If, as this paper contends, the subject-matter of the history of the human sciences (...)
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  9. Pietro Gori (2009). “Sounding Out Idols”: Knowledge, History and Metaphysics in Human, All Too Human and Twilight of the Idols. In Volker Gerhard & Renate Reschke (eds.), Nietzscheforschung, vol. 16.
    Twilight of the Idols has a main role in Nietzsche’s work, since it represents the opening writing of his project of Transvaluation of all values. The task of this essay is sounding out idols, i.e. to disclose their lack of content, their being hollow. The theme of eternal idols is in this work strictly related to the idea of a ‘true’ world and, consequently, a study on this latter notion can contribute to a better comprehension of what does that emptiness (...)
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  10.  9
    Furio Di Paola (1988). Human-Oriented and Machine-Oriented Reasoning: Remarks on Some Problems in the History of Automated Theorem Proving. [REVIEW] AI and Society 2 (2):121-131.
    Examples in the history of Automated Theorem Proving are given, in order to show that even a seemingly ‘mechanical’ activity, such as deductive inference drawing, involves special cultural features and tacit knowledge. Mechanisation of reasoning is thus regarded as a complex undertaking in ‘cultural pruning’ of human-oriented reasoning. Sociological counterparts of this passage from human- to machine-oriented reasoning are discussed, by focusing on problems of man-machine interaction in the area of computer-assisted proof processing.
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  11. Louis P. Pojman (2005). Who Are We?: Theories of Human Nature. Oxford University Press.
    What is our nature? What is this enigma that we call human? Who are we? Since the dawn of human history, people have exhibited wildly contradictory qualities: good and evil, love and hate, strength and weakness, kindness and cruelty, aggressiveness and pacifism, generosity and greed, courage and cowardice. Experiencing a sense of eternity in our hearts--but at the same time confined to temporal and spatial constraints--we seek to understand ourselves, both individually and as a species. In Who (...)
     
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  12.  87
    Fernando Vidal (1992). Jean Starobinski and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 5 (1):73-85.
    The name of the Genevan critic Jean Starobinski will most likely evoke masterful\nreadings of Rousseau and Montaigne, or insightful reconstructions of the world\nof the Enlightenment. With the possible exception of the history of melancholy,\nmuch more rarely will it be associated with the history of psychology and\npsychiatry. A small number of the critic’s contributions to this field have\nappeared in some of his books. Most of them, however, remain scattered, and\nnothing suggests that they are known as widely as they deserve.\nStarobinski’s (...)
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  13. John C. Burnham (2000). Changing Metaphors in History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):121-124.
    A generation or more ago, as the Cold War flourished, the continental European\nscholars whom I met seemed odd to me. They were, virtually without\nexception, totally preoccupied with whether their scholarship harmonized\nwith Marxism or refuted Marxism. This focus cut across disciplinary lines.\nIndeed, a basic assumption united these colleagues: the scholars’ world,\nwhether Karl Marx or Max Weber, consisted of centralized bureaucracies\nsuitable for socialism or at least for orderly organization.\nNorth American scholars shared with the Europeans, not the preoccupation\nwith Marxism, but the idea that (...)
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  14.  34
    Simon Evnine (1993). Hume, Conjectural History, and the Uniformity of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):589-606.
    In this paper I argue that, in at least two cases - his discussions of the temporal precedence o f polytheism over monotheism and of the origins of civil society - we see Hume consigning to historical development certain aspects of reason which, as a comparison with Locke will show, have sometimes been held to be uniform. In the first of these cases Hume has recourse to claims about the general historical development of human thought. In the second case, (...)
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  15.  7
    Donna J. Drucker (2012). 'A Most Interesting Chapter in the History of Science' Intellectual Responses to Alfred Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Male. History of the Human Sciences 25 (1):75-98.
    There were three broad categories of academic responses to Alfred Kinsey’s Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (Kinsey, Pomeroy and Martin, 1948): method; findings; and broader reflections on the book’s place in American social life and democracy. This article focuses primarily on archival academic responses to Kinsey’s work that appeared in the year following the book’s publication. Many academics agreed that some aspects of Kinsey’s method were flawed and that his interpretations sometimes overreached his raw data. Nonetheless, they also (...)
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  16.  9
    J. J. F. Durand (2007). The Many Faces of God: Highways and Byways on the Route Towards an Orthodox Image of God in the History of Christianity From the First to the Seventeenth Century. Sun Press.
    LANDSCAPING THE HUMAN SOUL In 1996 Lance Armstrong was diagnosed with stage-four testicular cancer. Doctors gave him a forty percent chance of survival. ...
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  17. Jean Starobinski (1992). Jean Starobinski and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 5 (1).
     
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  18.  9
    Felipe Fernández-Armesto (2004). So You Think You're Human?: A Brief History of Humankind. Oxford University Press.
    So You Think You're Human? confronts these problems from a historical perspective, showing how our current understanding of what it means to be human has been ...
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  19.  17
    Giorgio Manzi & Fabio Di Vincenzo (2013). Light Has Been Thrown (on Human Origins): a Brief History of Palaeoanthropology, with Notes on the "Punctuated" Origin of Homo Sapiens. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (2):31-48.
    “Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history”: this was the single line that Charles Darwin devoted to human evolution in the Origin of Species (1859). At present, there is a number of extinct species, which we understand to be related to human evolution, demonstrating that the Darwin’s prediction was correct: light has been thrown, indeed. Moreover, the science of human origin (or palaeoanthropology) appears to be able to shed much light not (...)
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  20.  1
    Owen Goldin & Patricia Kilroe (eds.) (1997). Human Life and the Natural World: Readings in the History of Western Philosophy. Broadview Press.
    Human concern over the urgency of current environmental issues increasingly entails wide-ranging discussions of how we may rethink the relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world. In order to provide a context for such discussions this anthology provides a selection of some of the most important, interesting and influential readings on the subject from classical times through to the late nineteenth century. Included are such figures as Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Hildegard of Bingen, St Francis of Assisi, (...)
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  21. Matthew R. Goodrum (2009). The History of Human Origins Research and its Place in the History of Science: Research Problems and Historiography. History of Science 47 (3):337.
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  22.  79
    Alfred Gierer (2004). Human Brain Evolution, Theories of Innovation, and Lessons From the History of Technology. J. Biosci 29 (3):235-244.
    Biological evolution and technological innovation, while differing in many respects, also share common features. In particular, implementation of a new technology in the market is analogous to the spreading of a new genetic trait in a population. Technological innovation may occur either through the accumulation of quantitative changes, as in the development of the ocean clipper, or it may be initiated by a new combination of features or subsystems, as in the case of steamships. Other examples of the latter type (...)
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  23.  9
    Paul Ramsey (1988). Human Sexuality in the History of Redemption. Journal of Religious Ethics 16 (1):56 - 86.
    If Augustine's view of human sexuality is to be understood properly, it must be represented across the history of creation, fall and redemption. His notion of sexuality prior to the fall, although defective in its understanding of personal bodily presence, does integrate sexuality into the essentially human. His account of fallen sexuality expresses not a body-soul dualism but a disordering of the self which finds a partial and redemptive remedy in the "goods of marriage." His treatment of (...)
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  24.  21
    Ralph R. Acampora (2006). Anthropocentrism and Its Discontents: The Moral Status of Animals in the History of Western Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):480-481.
    Ralph R. Acampora - Anthropocentrism and Its Discontents: The Moral Status of Animals in the History of Western Philosophy - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.3 480-481 Gary Steiner. Anthropocentrism and Its Discontents: The Moral Status of Animals in the History of Western Philosophy. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2005. Pp. ix + 332. Cloth, $37.50. In this text Steiner surveys the history of doctrines, attitudes, and (...)
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  25.  58
    Derek Edwards, Malcolm Ashmore & Jonathan Potter (1995). History of the Human. History of the Human Sciences 8 (2).
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  26.  40
    Ron Amundson (1998). Typology Reconsidered: Two Doctrines on the History of Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):153-177.
    Recent historiography of 19th century biology supports the revision of two traditional doctrines about the history of biology. First, the most important and widespread biological debate around the time of Darwin was not evolution versus creation, but biological functionalism versus structuralism. Second, the idealist and typological structuralist theories of the time were not particularly anti-evolutionary. Typological theories provided argumentation and evidence that was crucial to the refutation of Natural Theological creationism. The contrast between functionalist and structuralist approaches to (...)
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  27. John H. Finch (2007). History of the Human. History of the Human Sciences 20 (2).
     
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  28. Norman M. Ford (1988). When Did I Begin?: Conception of the Human Individual in History, Philosophy, and Science. Cambridge University Press.
    When Did I Begin? investigates the theoretical, moral, and biological issues surrounding the debate over the beginning of human life. With the continuing controversy over the use of in vitro fertilization techniques and experimentation with human embryos, these issues have been forced into the arena of public debate. Following a detailed analysis of the history of the question, Reverend Ford argues that a human individual could not begin before definitive individuation occurs with the appearance of the (...)
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  29.  8
    Jean-Marie Tremblay (2000). Vincent Descombes, Philosophie des Représentations Collectives. Un Article Publié Dans Revue Scientifique, History of the Human Sciences, Vol. 13, No 1, 2000. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 13 (1).
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  30. Richard Bellamy, Peter M. Logan, John I. Brooks Iii, David Couzens Hoy, Michael Donnelly & James M. Glass (forthcoming). History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences.
     
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  31. Felipe Fernandez-Armesto (2005). So You Think You 'Re Human?: A Brief History of Humankind'. Oxford University Press Uk.
    You think you're human. But what does that mean? How can humanity be defined? Felipe Fernandez-Armesto takes us on an enlightening and provocative journey through the history of humankind to reveal the challenges to our most fundamental belief - that we are, and have always been, human. Fernandez-Armesto investigates advances in artificial intelligence and genetics, and asks what these mean for the future of human values, human rights, and the defence of human dignity. The (...)
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  32. Smith Roger (1997). History and the History of the Human Sciences: What Voice? History of the Human Sciences 10 (3).
     
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  33. John Shotter (1994). 84 History of the Human Sciences Vol. 7 No. 1 3 This Development in Social Psychology Can Be Seen Both Here (Gergen, 1985) and in a Large Number of Subsequent Publications and Collections, Too Numerous to Cite, in Which Gergen has Played a Major Role. That He is Not Alone Can Be Seen in the Work Of. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 7 (1).
     
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  34. Jacques Virbel & Karine Chemla (2015). Prologue: Textual Acts and the History of Science. In Jacques Virbel & Karine Chemla (eds.), Texts, Textual Acts and the History of Science. Springer International Publishing
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  35. Karine Chemla & Jacques Virbel, Texts, Textual Acts and the History of Science.
    The book presents the outcomes of an innovative research programme in the history of science and implements a Text Act Theory which extends Speech Act Theory, in order to illustrate a new approach to texts and textual communicative acts. It examines assertives (absolute or conditional statements, forecasts, insurance, etc.), directives, declarations and enumerations, as well as different types of textual units allowing authors to perform these acts: algorithms, recipes, prescriptions, lexical templates for terminological studies and enumerative structures. (...)
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  36. Robin Williams, Roger Smith, Donna Harris, Hans Aarsleff, Svetlana Alpers, Stephen Bann, Gillian Beer, Seyla Benhabib, Roy Boyne & William Connolly (1990). Contributions and Correspondence Should Be Sent to the Editorial Assistant at University of Durham Centre for the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 3 (2):158.
     
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  37.  8
    Jose Filipe Silva (2012). Robert Kilwardby on the Human Soul: Plurality of Forms and Censorship in the Thirteenth Century. Brill.
    Robert Kilwardby on the Human Soul examines Kilwardby’s role in conciliating Aristotelian and Augustinian views on the soul, soul-body relation, and cognition.
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  38.  29
    William R. Everdell (1999). 25 Centuries of Atoms and Void. Pullman, Bernard, the Atom in the History of Human Thought, Translated by Axel R. Reisinger. Foundations of Chemistry 1 (3):305-309.
  39.  3
    Robert Gleave (2007). Scripturalist Islam: The History and Doctrines of the Akhbārī Shīʿī School. Brill.
    Akhbārī Shi'ism was "scripturalist" in that Akhbārīs believed that all questions of theology and law could be found in the texts of revelation. There was no need, they believed, to turn to alternative sources . This book offers the first detailed study of the School's doctrines and history.
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  40. David Frisby (1991). Reviews : Wilhelm Dilthey (Trans. Ramon J. Betanzos), Introduction to the Human Sciences: An Attempt to Lay a Foundation for the Study of Society and History, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester/Wheatsheaf, 1989, Paper £10.95, 386 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 4 (1):122-125.
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  41. Robert C. Solomon (1979). History and Human Nature: A Philosophical Review of European Philosophy and Culture, 1750-1850. University Press of America.
    Originally published by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich in 1979, this volume offers a cross-disciplinary portrait of a fascinating period in modern European history and culture, 1750ó1850. It presents a philosophically contentious thesis about the nature of history and "human nature".
     
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  42. David Boucher (1993). Human Conduct, History, and Social Science in the Works of R. G. Collingwood and Michael Oakeshott. New Literary History 24:697-717.
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  43. Janet Gyatso (2015). Being Human in a Buddhist World: An Intellectual History of Medicine in Early Modern Tibet. Cup.
    Critically exploring medical thought in a cultural milieu with no discernible influence from the European Enlightenment, _Being Human_ reveals an otherwise unnoticed intersection of early modern sensibilities and religious values in traditional Tibetan medicine. It further studies the adaptation of Buddhist concepts and values to medical concerns and suggests important dimensions of Buddhism's role in the development of Asian and global civilization. Through its unique focus and sophisticated reading of source materials,_ Being Human_ adds a crucial chapter in the larger (...)
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  44.  37
    Gary M. Hamburg & Randall Allen Poole (eds.) (2010). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830-1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: List of contributors; Acknowledgments; Introduction: the humanist tradition in Russian philosophy G. M. Hamburg and Randall A. Poole; Part I. The Nineteenth Century: 1. Slavophiles, Westernizers, and the birth of Russian philosophical humanism Sergey Horujy; 2. Alexander Herzen Derek Offord; 3. Materialism and the radical intelligentsia: the 1860s Victoria S. Frede; 4. Russian ethical humanism: from populism to neo-idealism Thomas Nemeth; Part II. Russian Metaphysical Idealism in Defense of Human Dignity: 5. Boris Chicherin and (...) dignity in history G. M. Hamburg; 6. Vladimir Solov'iev's philosophical anthropology: autonomy, dignity, perfectibility Randall A. Poole; 7. Russian panpsychism: Kozlov, Lopatin, Losskii James P. Scanlan; Part III. Humanity and Divinity in Russian Religious Philosophy after Solov'iev: 8. A Russian cosmodicy: Sergei Bulgakov's religious philosophy Paul Valliere; 9. Pavel Florenskii's trinitarian humanism Steven Cassedy; 10. Semën Frank's expressivist humanism Philip J. Swoboda; Part IV. Freedom and Human Perfectibility in the Silver Age: 11. Religious humanism in the Russian silver age Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal; 12. Russian liberalism and the philosophy of law Frances Nethercott; 13. Imagination and ideology in the new religious consciousness Robert Bird; 14. Eschatology and hope in silver age thought Judith Deutsch Kornblatt; Part V. Russian Philosophy in Revolution and Exile: 15. Russian Marxism Andrzej Walicki; 16. Adventures in dialectic and intuition: Shpet, Il'in, Losev Philip T. Grier; 17. Nikolai Berdiaev and the philosophical tasks of the emigration Stuart Finkel; 18. Eurasianism: affirming the person in an 'Era of Faith' Martin Beisswenger; Afterword: on persons as open-ended ends-in-themselves (the view from two novelists and two critics) Caryl Emerson; Bibliography. (shrink)
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  45. G. M. Hamburg & Randall A. Poole (eds.) (2011). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830–1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.
    The great age of Russian philosophy spans the century between 1830 and 1930 - from the famous Slavophile-Westernizer controversy of the 1830s and 1840s, through the 'Silver Age' of Russian culture at the beginning of the twentieth century, to the formation of a Russian 'philosophical emigration' in the wake of the Russian Revolution. This volume is a major history and interpretation of Russian philosophy in this period. Eighteen chapters discuss Russian philosophy's main figures, schools and controversies, while simultaneously pursuing (...)
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  46. G. M. Hamburg & Randall A. Poole (eds.) (2013). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830–1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.
    The great age of Russian philosophy spans the century between 1830 and 1930 - from the famous Slavophile-Westernizer controversy of the 1830s and 1840s, through the 'Silver Age' of Russian culture at the beginning of the twentieth century, to the formation of a Russian 'philosophical emigration' in the wake of the Russian Revolution. This volume is a major history and interpretation of Russian philosophy in this period. Eighteen chapters discuss Russian philosophy's main figures, schools and controversies, while simultaneously pursuing (...)
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  47.  30
    Françoise Baylis & Matthew Herder (2009). Policy Design for Human Embryo Research in Canada: A History (Part 1 of 2). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):109-122.
    This article is the first in a two-part review of policy design for human embryo research in Canada. In this article we explain how this area of research is circumscribed by law promulgated by the federal Parliament (the Assisted Human Reproduction Act ) and by guidelines issued by the Tri-Agencies (the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans and Updated Guidelines for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research ). In so doing, we provide the first comprehensive (...)
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  48. No Authorship Indicated (1999). Review of Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):229-230.
    Reviews the book, Genes, genesis, and God: Values and their origins in natural and human history by Holmes Rolston III . Drawn from a series of lectures given by the author in November of 1997 at the University of Edinburgh as part of the Gifford Lectures, this book addresses the question of whether the supremely social and human phenomena of religion and ethics can be ultimately reduced to the phenomena of biology. Challenging much of what passes for (...)
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  49. Petteri Pietikainen (2003). Consciousness Historicized: Philosophical History and the Nature of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):151-158.
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  50.  4
    Abraham Magendzo & María Isabel Toledo (2009). Moral Dilemmas in Teaching Recent History Related to the Violation of Human Rights in Chile. Journal of Moral Education 38 (4):445-465.
    This article reviews the moral dilemmas that a teacher faces in the classroom when teaching recent history which deals with military regimes, violation of human rights and the transition to democracy in Chile . Furthermore, it explores the neutrality of the content taught; the ideological standpoints of the teachers and the students; emotions that emerge; relationships with the victims and so on. These tensions were noted during research undertaken in secondary schools in Santiago, Chile, in 2007. Introducing recent (...)
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