Search results for 'Human beings Animal nature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  46
    Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's (...)
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  2.  37
    Dominick LaCapra (2009). History and its Limits: Human, Animal, Violence. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction For Freud, beyond the explanatory limits of the pleasure principle lay the repetition compulsion, the death drive, and trauma with its ...
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  3. Harry Cowen (1994). The Human Nature Debate: Social Theory, Social Policy, and the Caring Professions. Pluto Press.
     
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  4.  7
    Koichiro Misawa (2014). Animality and Rationality in Human Beings: Towards Enriching Contemporary Educational Studies. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (2):182-196.
    “What is the nature of the beings that we are?” is perhaps the most difficult question. The difficulty lies in our being a natural animal in a normative environment. In harmony with John McDowell’s conception of a naturalism of second nature, this paper claims that we should not rest satisfied with the predominant scientific picture in which the seeming rift between our animality and our rationality is to be resolved by detailed studies of empirically knowable facts (...)
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  5.  56
    Giorgio Agamben (2004). The Open: Man and Animal. Stanford University Press.
    The end of human history is an event that has been foreseen or announced by both messianics and dialecticians. But who is the protagonist of that history that is coming—or has come—to a close? What is man? How did he come on the scene? And how has he maintained his privileged place as the master of, or first among, the animals? In The Open, contemporary Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben considers the ways in which the “human” has been thought (...)
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  6.  18
    Wessel Stoker (2000). Are Human Beings Religious by Nature? Schleiermacher's Generic View of Religion and The Contemporary Pluralistic, Secular Culture. Bijdragen 61 (1):51-75.
    This article rejects the claim that human beings are religious by nature. This rejection is controversial. It is always said by catholic and protestant philosophers and theologians that human beings are religious by nature. Schleiermacher holds that the feeling of absolute dependence does not define religion, but it is the defining characteristic that makes a certain phenomenon a religiousone. This defining characteristic is borrowed from christian faith in the one God the creator. I raise (...)
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  7.  49
    Christopher Lang, Elliott Sober & Karen Strier (2002). Are Human Beings Part of the Rest of Nature? Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):661-671.
    Unified explanations seek to situate the traits of human beings in a causal framework that also explains the trait values found in nonhuman species. Disunified explanations claim that the traits of human beings are due to causal processes not at work in the rest of nature. This paper outlines a methodology for testing hypotheses of these two types. Implications are drawn concerning evolutionary psychology, adaptationism, and anti-adaptationism.
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  8.  9
    Simon P. James (2016). Protecting Nature for the Sake of Human Beings. Ratio 29 (2):213-227.
    It is often assumed that to say that nature should be protected for the sake of human beings just is to say that it should be protected because it is a means to one or more anthropocentric ends. I argue that this assumption is false. In some contexts, claims that a particular natural X should be protected for our sakes mean that X should be protected, not because it is a means to anthropocentric ends, but because it (...)
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  9.  38
    Hans-Peter Kr (1998). The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107 – 119.
    John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right reminder (...)
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  10.  26
    Hans-Peter Krüger (1998). The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107-119.
    Abstract John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right (...)
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  11.  3
    Hans-Peter Krüger (2009). The Public Nature of Human Beings. Parallels Between Classical Pragmatisms and Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Iris 1 (1):195-204.
    Though Helmuth Plessner (1892-1985) elaborated his philosophical anthropology independently of the classical pragmatisms, there are many parallels with them. He combined a phenomenology of living beings (a parallel with William James) with a semiotic reconstruction (a parallel with Charles Sanders Peirce) of what we are already using whenever we specify living beings, among them ourselves as human living beings in nature, culture, and society. In Plessner’s distinction between having a body (Körperhaben) and being (or living) (...)
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  12. Drucilla Cornell, Julian H. Franklin, Heather M. Kendrick, Eduardo Mendieta, Andrew Linzey, Paola Cavalieri, Rod Preece, Ted Benton, Michael J. Thompson, Michael Allen Fox, Lori Gruen, Ralph R. Acampora, Bernard Rollin & Peter Sloterdijk (2012). Strangers to Nature: Animal Lives and Human Ethics. Lexington Books.
    Strangers to Nature brings together many of the leading scholars who are working to redefine and expand the discourse on animal ethics. This volume will engage both scholars and lay-people by revealing the breadth of theorizing about the human/non-human animal relationship that is currently taking place.
     
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  13.  21
    Beril İdemen Sözmen (2013). Harm in the Wild: Facing Non-Human Suffering in Nature. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):1075-1088.
    The paper is concerned with whether the reductio of the natural-harm-argument can be avoided by disvaluing non-human suffering and death. According to the natural-harm-argument, alleviating the suffering of non-human animals is not a moral obligation for human beings because such an obligation would also morally prescribe human intervention in nature for the protection of non-human animal interests which, it claims, is absurd. It is possible to avoid the reductio by formulating the moral (...)
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  14.  8
    Frédéric Vandenberghe (2003). The Nature of Culture. Towards a Realist Phenomenology of Material, Animal and Human Nature. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (4):461-475.
    In an ironic rejoinder to the postmodern politics of nature, I will adopt an anthropological perspective on culture, which is conspicuous by its absence in the latest wave of science studies, and reformulate the distinction between nature and culture as a reflexive distinction within culture that emerges with modernity. In order to countering the hypertextualism of the constructivists, I will next sketch out a realist theory of nature. Combining the transcendental realism of Roy Bhaskar with the transcendental (...)
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  15. Gregory R. Smulewicz-Zucker (ed.) (2012). Strangers to Nature: Animal Lives and Human Ethics. Lexington Books.
    Strangers to Nature brings together many of the leading scholars who are working to redefine and expand the discourse on animal ethics. This volume will engage both scholars and lay-people by revealing the breadth of theorizing about the human/non-human animal relationship that is currently taking place.
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  16.  16
    Giovanni Felice Azzone (2003). The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic (...)
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  17. Alain de Benoist (2010). Des Animaux Et des Hommes: La Place de l'Homme Dans la Nature: Essai. Alexipharmaque.
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  18. Roger Teichmann (2014). Nature, Reason, and the Good Life Ethics for Human Beings. Oxford University Press Uk.
    At the centre of our ethical thought stands the human being. Roger Teichmann examines the ways in which facts about human nature determine the shape of ethical concepts such as rationality, virtue, and happiness. He argues that only by attending to the social and empirical character of language use can we address a number of problems in ethics.
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  19.  1
    Orivaldo Pimentel Lopes Junior (2010). Ser Humano e Natureza na Teologia Cristã: “Quando fizestes a um lençol freático, a mim me fizestes” (Human being and Nature in Christian Theology:“as you do something to the water table you do it to me”) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n17p79. [REVIEW] Horizonte 8 (17):79-87.
    A utilização de um texto bíblico por um senador para justificar sua oposição a medidas de proteção ambiental é pretexto para uma série de considerações acerca da Teologia cristã sobre o meio-ambiente, e a relação entre religião e sociedade. Três questões são levantadas: a pretensa separação dos humanos da natureza, a pretensa homogeneização do "ser humano", e a pretensa simplicidade da interpretação teológica de um texto sagrado. O emprego dos verbos hebraicos KABASH e RADAHA abre uma discussão sobre o sentido (...)
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  20.  64
    Helen Thornton (2005). State of Nature or Eden?: Thomas Hobbes and His Contemporaries on the Natural Condition of Human Beings. University of Rochester Press.
    State of nature or Eden? -- Hobbes' state of nature as an account of the fall? -- Hobbes' own belief or unbelief -- The contemporary reaction to Leviathan -- Hobbes and commentaries on Genesis -- A note on method and chapter order -- Good and evil -- Hobbes on good and evil -- The 'seditious doctrines' of the schoolmen -- The contemporary reaction -- The scriptural account -- The state of nature as an account of the fall? (...)
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  21.  10
    Richard Bowler (2005). Sentient Nature and Human Economy: The 'Human'Science of Early Nationalökonomie. History of the Human Sciences 18 (1):23-54.
    Over the course of the 18th century, scholarly examinations of animal nature and behavior rejected ‘mechanical’, overly deterministic hypotheses, suggesting instead that animal action proceeded from a psycho-physiological sentient capacity. Though the ultimate causes of this capacity appeared to elude explanation, they expressed themselves in behaviors that scholars described and analyzed. Interpretations of sentient, animal nature also bore on the contemporary understanding of human nature: like animals, human beings were also considered (...)
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  22.  17
    Adriel Trott (2012). The Human Animal. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):269-285.
    I argue that the human being fits squarely within the natural world in Aristotle’s anthropology. Like other natural beings, we strive to fulfill our end from the potential within us to achieve that end. Logos does not make human beings unnatural but makes us responsible for our actualization. As rational, the human can never be reduced to mere living animal but is always already concerned with living well; yet, as natural, she is not separated (...)
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  23. Wessel Stoker (2005). Are Human Beings Religious by Nature? Bijdragen 61 (1):51-75.
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  24. Roy F. Baumeister (2005). The Cultural Animal: Human Nature, Meaning, and Social Life. Oxford University Press Usa.
    What makes us human? Why do people think, feel and act as they do? What is the essence of human nature? What is the basic relationship between the individual and society? These questions have fascinated both great thinkers and ordinary humans for centuries. Now, at last, there is a solid basis for answering them, in the form of accumulated efforts and studies by thousands of psychology researchers. We no longer have to rely on navel-gazing and speculation to (...)
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  25.  92
    Mark Johnston (2007). Human Beings Revisited: My Body is Not an Animal. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 3:33-74.
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  26. John Hacker-Wright (2012). Teichmann , Roger . Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 224. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (3):637-641.
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  27. W. H. Thorpe (1975). Animal Nature and Human Nature. Philosophy 50 (194):485-487.
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  28.  27
    Mikael Stenmark (2012). Is There a Human Nature? Zygon 47 (4):890-902.
    Both evolutionary theory and Christian faith have a number of things to say about human beings. Evolutionists claim that humans are animals with a bipedal walk, an erect posture, and a large brain, while Christians maintain that, like everything else, human beings are created by God, but that, in contrast to other things on earth, we humans are also created in the image of God. This much is clear, but do either evolutionists or Christians also claim (...)
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  29.  15
    Jason T. Eberl (2004). Aquinas on the Nature of Human Beings. Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):333 - 365.
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  30.  1
    Richard Schmitt (1998). Beyond Separateness: The Social Nature of Human Beings-Their Autonomy, Knowledge, and Power. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (4):989-992.
    This book examines in great detail the different aspects of dominant individualistic ideas about persons. It tries to argue that an alternative conception of persons, favored by many feminist thinkers, is more complicated than is often thought but can be shown to be a reasonable and plausible conception.
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  31.  2
    Daniel P. Thero (2013). Teichmann, Roger., Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings. Review of Metaphysics 67 (1):192-193.
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  32.  6
    C. Joachim Classen (1979). Animals and Human Beings in Ancient Thought. Studies in Animal Psychology, Anthropology and Ethics. Philosophy and History 12 (1):16-17.
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  33.  5
    Mark Lebar (2012). Nature, Reason, & the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings. By Roger Teichmann. (Oxford UP, 2011). Pp. Xvi+192. Price £35.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):633-635.
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  34.  6
    Hugo Meynell (1975). Animal Nature and Human Nature By W. H. Thorpe Methuen, 1974, Xviii + 435 Pp., £7.20. [REVIEW] Philosophy 50 (194):485-.
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  35.  3
    J. Kekes (2012). Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings, by Roger Teichmann. Mind 121 (482):547-552.
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  36. William Hasker (1998). The Nature of Human Beings: A Mediating View. In Melville Y. Stewart & Chih-kʻang Chang (eds.), The Symposium of Chinese-American Philosophy and Religious Studies. International Scholars Publications 1--37.
     
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  37. Richard T. Kim (2015). Human Nature and Animal Nature. International Philosophical Quarterly 55 (4):437-456.
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  38. Anna Krajewska (2012). Roger Teichmnn, Nature, Reason and the Good Life. Ethics for Human Beings. Roczniki Filozoficzne:128-134.
     
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  39. Hugo Meynell (1975). THORPE, W. H. "Animal Nature and Human Nature". [REVIEW] Philosophy 50:485.
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  40. James Lindemann Nelson (1992). Transplantation Through a Glass Darkly; Should Baboons Become Spare Parts Bins for Human Beings? Not When Their Moral Nature Remains a Mystery to Us. Hastings Center Report 22.
     
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  41.  12
    Roger Teichmann (2011). Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings. Oxford University Press.
    Starting from an examination of foundational issues, the book covers a range of topics, including animals, agency, enjoyment, the good life, contemplation, ...
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  42. D. Tietjens Meyers (1998). Beyond Separateness: The Social Nature of Human Beings-Their Autonomy, Knowledge, and Power by Richard Schmitt. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58:989-991.
     
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  43.  4
    Carlos Naconecy (2014). New Perspectives on Animal Ethics Strangers to Nature: Animal Lives and Human Ethics Smulewicz-Zucker Gregory R. Lexington Books (Lanham, MD). Journal of Animal Ethics 4 (2):80-85.
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  44. Hans-Peter Krüger (2010). Gehirn, Verhalten Und Zeit: Philosophische Anthropologie Als Forschungsrahmen. Akademie Verlag.
    Menschenaffen erganzen ihr Instinkt- und Triebleben positivistisch durch individuelle Intelligenz, Sozialitat und Kulturalitat.
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  45.  1
    Stephen Sparks (2010). Semiotics and Human Nature in Postmodernity: A Consideration of Animal Semioticum as the Postmodern Definition of Human Being. Semiotica 2010 (179):259-294.
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  46.  4
    FrédéricVandenberghe (2003). The Nature of Culture. Towards a Realist Phenomenology of Material, Animal and Human Nature. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (4):461–475.
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  47.  4
    V. Reynolds (1980). Animal Behaviour and Human Nature. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 10 (1):57–64.
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  48. Margherita D'Amico (2007). La Pelle Dell'orso: Noi E Gli Altri Animali. Mondadori.
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  49. James S. Trefil (2004). Human Nature: A Blueprint for Managing the Earth--By People, for People. Times Books/Henry Holt.
    A radical approach to the environment which argues that by harnessing the power of science for human benefit, we can have a healthier planet As a prizewinning theoretical physicist and an outspoken advocate for scientific literacy, James Trefil has long been the public's guide to a better understanding of the world. In this provocative book, Trefil looks squarely at our environmental future and finds-contrary to popular wisdom-reason to celebrate. For too long, Trefil argues, humans have treated nature as (...)
     
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  50.  73
    Rebecca L. Walker (2006). Human and Animal Subjects of Research: The Moral Significance of Respect Versus Welfare. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):305-331.
    Human beings with diminished decision-making capacities are usually thought to require greater protections from the potential harms of research than fully autonomous persons. Animal subjects of research receive lesser protections than any human beings regardless of decision-making capacity. Paradoxically, however, it is precisely animals’ lack of some characteristic human capacities that is commonly invoked to justify using them for human purposes. In other words, for humans lesser capacities correspond to greater protections but for (...)
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