Search results for 'Human beings Animal nature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.score: 886.0
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's (...)
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  2. Pär Segerdahl (2007). Can Natural Behavior Be Cultivated? The Farm as Local Human/Animal Culture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (2):167-193.score: 680.0
    Although the notion of natural behavior occurs in many policy-making and legal documents on animal welfare, no consensus has been reached concerning its definition. This paper argues that one reason why the notion resists unanimously accepted definition is that natural behavior is not properly a biological concept, although it aspires to be one, but rather a philosophical tendency to perceive animal behavior in accordance with certain dichotomies between nature and culture, animal and human, original orders (...)
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  3. Dominick LaCapra (2009). History and its Limits: Human, Animal, Violence. Cornell University Press.score: 648.0
    Introduction For Freud, beyond the explanatory limits of the pleasure principle lay the repetition compulsion, the death drive, and trauma with its ...
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  4. Harry Cowen (1994). The Human Nature Debate: Social Theory, Social Policy, and the Caring Professions. Pluto Press.score: 648.0
     
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  5. Stephen Sparks (2010). Semiotics and Human Nature in Postmodernity: A Consideration of Animal Semioticum as the Postmodern Definition of Human Being. Semiotica 2010 (179):259-294.score: 600.0
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  6. Giovanni Felice Azzone (2003). The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.score: 568.0
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic (...)
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  7. Orivaldo Pimentel Lopes Junior (2010). Ser Humano e Natureza na Teologia Cristã: “Quando fizestes a um lençol freático, a mim me fizestes” (Human being and Nature in Christian Theology:“as you do something to the water table you do it to me”) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n17p79. [REVIEW] Horizonte 8 (17):79-87.score: 537.8
    A utilização de um texto bíblico por um senador para justificar sua oposição a medidas de proteção ambiental é pretexto para uma série de considerações acerca da Teologia cristã sobre o meio-ambiente, e a relação entre religião e sociedade. Três questões são levantadas: a pretensa separação dos humanos da natureza, a pretensa homogeneização do "ser humano", e a pretensa simplicidade da interpretação teológica de um texto sagrado. O emprego dos verbos hebraicos KABASH e RADAHA abre uma discussão sobre o sentido (...)
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  8. Giorgio Agamben (2004). The Open: Man and Animal. Stanford University Press.score: 536.0
    The end of human history is an event that has been foreseen or announced by both messianics and dialecticians. But who is the protagonist of that history that is coming—or has come—to a close? What is man? How did he come on the scene? And how has he maintained his privileged place as the master of, or first among, the animals? In The Open, contemporary Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben considers the ways in which the “human” has been thought (...)
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  9. Christopher Lang, Elliott Sober & Karen Strier (2002). Are Human Beings Part of the Rest of Nature? Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):661-671.score: 513.0
    Unified explanations seek to situate the traits of human beings in a causal framework that also explains the trait values found in nonhuman species. Disunified explanations claim that the traits of human beings are due to causal processes not at work in the rest of nature. This paper outlines a methodology for testing hypotheses of these two types. Implications are drawn concerning evolutionary psychology, adaptationism, and anti-adaptationism.
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  10. Hans-Peter Kr (1998). The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107 – 119.score: 513.0
    John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right reminder (...)
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  11. Hans-Peter Krüger (1998). The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107-119.score: 513.0
    Abstract John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right (...)
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  12. Hans-Peter Krüger (2009). The Public Nature of Human Beings. Parallels Between Classical Pragmatisms and Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Iris 1 (1):195-204.score: 513.0
    Though Helmuth Plessner (1892-1985) elaborated his philosophical anthropology independently of the classical pragmatisms, there are many parallels with them. He combined a phenomenology of living beings (a parallel with William James) with a semiotic reconstruction (a parallel with Charles Sanders Peirce) of what we are already using whenever we specify living beings, among them ourselves as human living beings in nature, culture, and society. In Plessner’s distinction between having a body (Körperhaben) and being (or living) (...)
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  13. Beril İdemen Sözmen (2013). Harm in the Wild: Facing Non-Human Suffering in Nature. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):1075-1088.score: 492.0
    The paper is concerned with whether the reductio of the natural-harm-argument can be avoided by disvaluing non-human suffering and death. According to the natural-harm-argument, alleviating the suffering of non-human animals is not a moral obligation for human beings because such an obligation would also morally prescribe human intervention in nature for the protection of non-human animal interests which, it claims, is absurd. It is possible to avoid the reductio by formulating the moral (...)
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  14. Roger Teichmann (2011). Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings. Oxford University Press.score: 479.0
    Starting from an examination of foundational issues, the book covers a range of topics, including animals, agency, enjoyment, the good life, contemplation, ...
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  15. Adriel Trott (2012). The Human Animal. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):269-285.score: 478.0
    I argue that the human being fits squarely within the natural world in Aristotle’s anthropology. Like other natural beings, we strive to fulfill our end from the potential within us to achieve that end. Logos does not make human beings unnatural but makes us responsible for our actualization. As rational, the human can never be reduced to mere living animal but is always already concerned with living well; yet, as natural, she is not separated (...)
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  16. Alain de Benoist (2010). Des Animaux Et des Hommes: La Place de l'Homme Dans la Nature: Essai. Alexipharmaque.score: 468.0
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  17. Helen Thornton (2005). State of Nature or Eden?: Thomas Hobbes and His Contemporaries on the Natural Condition of Human Beings. University of Rochester Press.score: 454.5
    State of nature or Eden? -- Hobbes' state of nature as an account of the fall? -- Hobbes' own belief or unbelief -- The contemporary reaction to Leviathan -- Hobbes and commentaries on Genesis -- A note on method and chapter order -- Good and evil -- Hobbes on good and evil -- The 'seditious doctrines' of the schoolmen -- The contemporary reaction -- The scriptural account -- The state of nature as an account of the fall? (...)
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  18. John Hacker-Wright (2012). Teichmann , Roger . Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 224. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (3):637-641.score: 427.5
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  19. Mark Johnston (2007). Human Beings Revisited: My Body is Not an Animal. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 3:33-74.score: 427.5
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  20. Jason T. Eberl (2004). Aquinas on the Nature of Human Beings. Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):333 - 365.score: 427.5
  21. Hugo Meynell (1975). Animal Nature and Human Nature By W. H. Thorpe Methuen, 1974, Xviii + 435 Pp., £7.20. [REVIEW] Philosophy 50 (194):485-.score: 427.5
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  22. Mark Lebar (2012). Nature, Reason, & the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings. By Roger Teichmann. (Oxford UP, 2011). Pp. Xvi+192. Price £35.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):633-635.score: 427.5
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  23. J. Kekes (2012). Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings, by Roger Teichmann. Mind 121 (482):547-552.score: 427.5
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  24. C. Joachim Classen (1979). Animals and Human Beings in Ancient Thought. Studies in Animal Psychology, Anthropology and Ethics. Philosophy and History 12 (1):16-17.score: 427.5
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  25. Wessel Stoker (2005). Are Human Beings Religious by Nature? Bijdragen 61 (1):51-75.score: 427.5
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  26. Wessel Stoker (2000). Are Human Beings Religious by Nature? Schleiermacher's Generic View of Religion and The Contemporary Pluralistic, Secular Culture. Bijdragen 61 (1):51-75.score: 427.5
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  27. William Hasker (1998). The Nature of Human Beings: A Mediating View. In Melville Y. Stewart & Chih-kʻang Chang (eds.), The Symposium of Chinese-American Philosophy and Religious Studies. International Scholars Publications. 1--37.score: 427.5
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  28. Anna Krajewska (2012). Roger Teichmnn, Nature, Reason and the Good Life. Ethics for Human Beings. Roczniki Filozoficzne:128-134.score: 427.5
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  29. James Lindemann Nelson (1992). Transplantation Through a Glass Darkly; Should Baboons Become Spare Parts Bins for Human Beings? Not When Their Moral Nature Remains a Mystery to Us. Hastings Center Report 22.score: 427.5
     
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  30. Eric W. Sanderson, Malanding Jaiteh, Marc A. Levy, Kent H. Redford, Antoinette V. Wannebo & Gillian Woolmer (2002). The Human Footprint and the Last of the Wild The Human Footprint is a Global Map of Human Influence on the Land Surface, Which Suggests That Human Beings Are Stewards of Nature, Whether We Like It or Not. Bioscience 52 (10):891-904.score: 427.5
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  31. Daniel P. Thero (2013). Teichmann, Roger., Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings. Review of Metaphysics 67 (1):192-193.score: 427.5
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  32. D. Tietjens Meyers (1998). Beyond Separateness: The Social Nature of Human Beings-Their Autonomy, Knowledge, and Power by Richard Schmitt. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58:989-991.score: 427.5
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  33. Micah Lott (forthcoming). Why Be a Good Human Being? Natural Goodness, Reason, and the Authority of Human Nature. Philosophia:1-17.score: 420.0
    The central claim of Aristotelian naturalism is that moral goodness is a kind of species-specific natural goodness. Aristotelian naturalism has recently enjoyed a resurgence in the work of philosophers such as Philippa Foot, Rosalind Hursthouse, and Michael Thompson. However, any view that takes moral goodness to be a type of natural goodness faces a challenge: Granting that moral goodness is natural goodness for human beings, why should we care about being good human beings? Given that we (...)
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  34. Kathryn Paxton George (1990). So Animal a Human ..., Or the Moral Relevance of Being an Omnivore. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 3 (2):172-186.score: 418.0
    It is argued that the question of whether or not one is required to be or become a strict vegetarian depends, not upon a rule or ideal that endorses vegetarianism on moral grounds, but rather upon whether one's own physical, biological nature is adapted to maintaining health and well-being on a vegetarian diet. Even if we accept the view that animals have rights, we still have no duty to make ourselves substantially worse off for the sake of other rights-holders. (...)
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  35. Hans-Peter Krüger (2010). Gehirn, Verhalten Und Zeit: Philosophische Anthropologie Als Forschungsrahmen. Akademie Verlag.score: 408.0
    Menschenaffen erganzen ihr Instinkt- und Triebleben positivistisch durch individuelle Intelligenz, Sozialitat und Kulturalitat.
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  36. James S. Trefil (2004). Human Nature: A Blueprint for Managing the Earth--By People, for People. Times Books/Henry Holt.score: 406.5
    A radical approach to the environment which argues that by harnessing the power of science for human benefit, we can have a healthier planet As a prizewinning theoretical physicist and an outspoken advocate for scientific literacy, James Trefil has long been the public's guide to a better understanding of the world. In this provocative book, Trefil looks squarely at our environmental future and finds-contrary to popular wisdom-reason to celebrate. For too long, Trefil argues, humans have treated nature as (...)
     
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  37. FrédéricVandenberghe (2003). The Nature of Culture. Towards a Realist Phenomenology of Material, Animal and Human Nature. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (4):461–475.score: 405.0
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  38. V. Reynolds (1980). Animal Behaviour and Human Nature. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 10 (1):57–64.score: 405.0
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  39. Drucilla Cornell, Julian H. Franklin, Heather M. Kendrick, Eduardo Mendieta, Andrew Linzey, Paola Cavalieri, Rod Preece, Ted Benton, Michael J. Thompson, Michael Allen Fox, Lori Gruen, Ralph R. Acampora, Bernard Rollin & Peter Sloterdijk (2012). Strangers to Nature: Animal Lives and Human Ethics. Lexington Books.score: 405.0
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  40. Frédéric Vandenberghe (2003). The Nature of Culture. Towards a Realist Phenomenology of Material, Animal and Human Nature. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (4):461-475.score: 405.0
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  41. Fabrice Jotterand (2008). Beyond Therapy and Enhancement: The Alteration of Human Nature. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 2 (1):15-23.score: 403.0
    With the rapid progress and considerable promise of nanobiotechnology/neurosciences there is the potential of transforming the very nature of human beings and of how humans can conceive of themselves as rational animals through technological innovations. The interface between humans and machines (neuro-digital interface), can potentially alter what it means to be human, i.e., the very idea of human nature and of normal functioning will be changed. In this paper, I argue that we are potentially (...)
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  42. Margherita D'Amico (2007). La Pelle Dell'orso: Noi E Gli Altri Animali. Mondadori.score: 396.0
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  43. Abraham P. Bos (2010). Aristotle on the Difference Between Plants, Animals, and Human Beings and on the Elements as Instruments of the Soul (De Anima 2.4.415b18). [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 63 (4):821-841.score: 364.0
    Why do all animals possess sense perception while plants don’t? And should the difference in quality of life between human beings and wolves be explained by supposing that wolves have degenerated souls? This paper argues that for Aristotle differences in quality of life among living beings are based on differences in the quality of their soul-principle together with the body that receives the soul. The paper proposes a new interpretation of On the Soul 2.4.415b18: “For all the (...)
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  44. Christine M. Korsgaard, Human Beings and the Other Animals.score: 363.0
    Human ethical practices and attitudes with respect to the other animals exhibit a curious instability. On the one hand, most people believe that it is wrong to inflict torment or death on a non-human animal for a trivial reason. Skinning a cat or setting it on fire by way of a juvenile prank is one of the standard examples of obvious wrongdoing in the philosophical literature. Like torturing infants, it is the kind of example that philosophers use (...)
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  45. Rebecca L. Walker (2006). Human and Animal Subjects of Research: The Moral Significance of Respect Versus Welfare. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):305-331.score: 363.0
    Human beings with diminished decision-making capacities are usually thought to require greater protections from the potential harms of research than fully autonomous persons. Animal subjects of research receive lesser protections than any human beings regardless of decision-making capacity. Paradoxically, however, it is precisely animals’ lack of some characteristic human capacities that is commonly invoked to justify using them for human purposes. In other words, for humans lesser capacities correspond to greater protections but for (...)
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  46. Mary Midgley (1995/2002). Beast and Man: The Roots of Human Nature. Routledge.score: 355.0
    Philosophers have traditionally concentrated on the qualities that make human beings different from other species. In Beast and Man Mary Midgley, one of our foremost intellectuals, stresses continuities. What makes people tick? Largely, she asserts, the same things as animals. She tells us humans are rather more like other animals than we previously allowed ourselves to believe, and reminds us just how primitive we are in comparison to the sophistication of many animals. A veritable classic for our age, (...)
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  47. Michele D.’Ambra (2008). Spirit and Soul in Hedwig Conrad-Martius's Metaphysical Dialogues : From Nature to the Human Being. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 18 (4):491-502.score: 352.0
    Through the analysis of Conrad-Martius Metaphysical Dialogues, our aim is show the relevance of the concept of spirit (Geist) and soul (Seele) to clarify the constitution of the human being. In order to understand Conrad-Martius’ phenomenological description, it is necessary to explain Husserl’s and Stein’s approaches to the same argument. Briefly their position is described at the beginning of the essay and then the main points of Conrad-Martius’ book are pinpointed. Human being is understandable in the complex of (...)
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  48. John Ryan, Passive Flora? Reconsidering Nature's Agency Through Human-Plant Studies (HPS).score: 350.0
    Plants have been—and, for reasons of human sustenance and creative inspiration, will continue to be—centrally important to societies globally. Yet, plants—including herbs, shrubs, and trees—are commonly characterized in Western thought as passive, sessile, and silent automatons lacking a brain, as accessories or backdrops to human affairs. Paradoxically, the qualities considered absent in plants are those employed by biologists to argue for intelligence in animals. Yet an emerging body of research in the sciences and humanities challenges animal-centred biases (...)
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  49. Robert B. Louden (2011). Kant's Human Being: Essays on His Theory of Human Nature. OUP USA.score: 348.0
    In Kant's Human Being, Robert B. Louden continues and deepens avenues of research first initiated in his highly acclaimed book, Kant's Impure Ethics. Drawing on a wide variety of both published and unpublished works spanning all periods of Kant's extensive writing career, Louden here focuses on Kant's under-appreciated empirical work on human nature, with particular attention to the connections between this body of work and his much-discussed ethical theory. Kant repeatedly claimed that the question, "What is the (...)
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  50. Antony Flew (1978). A Rational Animal and Other Philosophical Essays on the Nature of Man. Clarendon Press.score: 348.0
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