Search results for 'Human beings Forecasting' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Christopher Cordner (2005). Life and Death Matters: Losing a Sense of the Value of Human Beings. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):207-226.score: 224.0
    The essay combines a specific and a more general theme. In attacking ‘the doctrine of the sanctity of human life’ Singer takes himself thereby to be opposing the conviction that human life has special value. I argue that this conviction goes deep in our lives in many ways that do not depend on what Singer identifies as central to that ‘doctrine’, and that his attack therefore misses its main target. I argue more generally that Singer’s own moral philosophy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Weixiang Ding (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13-37.score: 224.0
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, “ ming 命 (destiny or decrees)” and “ tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)” mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from “ ling 令 (decrees),” which evolved from “ wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)” into “ tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees),” and then became “ ming ” from a throne because of the decisive role of “heavenly decrees” over a throne. “ Ming ” and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Armin Grunwald & Yannick Julliard (2007). Nanotechnology – Steps Towards Understanding Human Beings as Technology? NanoEthics 1 (2):77-87.score: 224.0
    Far-reaching promises made by nanotechnology have raised the question of whether we are on the way to understanding human beings more and more as belonging to the realm of technology. In this paper, an increasing need to understand the technological re-conceptualization of human beings is diagnosed whenever increasingly “technical” interpretations of humans as mechanical entities are disseminated. And this can be observed at present in the framework of nanobiotechnology, a foremost “technical” self-description where a technical language (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ding Weixiang & Huang Deyuan (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13 - 37.score: 224.0
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, "ming 命 (destiny or decrees)" and "tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)" mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from "ling 令 (decrees)," which evolved from "wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)" into "tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees)," and then became "ming" from a throne because of the decisive role of "heavenly decrees" over a throne. "Ming" and "tian ming" have different definitions: "Ming" represented the limits (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Wilbur R. Hubbard (1951). Secondary Reinforcement of a Simple Discrimination in Human Beings. Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (4):233.score: 196.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jaroslav Pecen (ed.) (1988). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Beings: Papers by Czechoslovak Aut[H]Ors of the Main Theme of the Xviii. World Congres[S] of Philosophy. Academia - Publishing House of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences.score: 196.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Cardwell Lee Sheridan (2008). Transition From Man. Bennett & Hastings Pub..score: 180.0
    Transition to man -- Transition from man -- And beyond.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Norman Barraclough (1980). Preology. Distributed by Pergamon Press.score: 174.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christine M. Korsgaard, Human Beings and the Other Animals.score: 168.0
    Human ethical practices and attitudes with respect to the other animals exhibit a curious instability. On the one hand, most people believe that it is wrong to inflict torment or death on a non-human animal for a trivial reason. Skinning a cat or setting it on fire by way of a juvenile prank is one of the standard examples of obvious wrongdoing in the philosophical literature. Like torturing infants, it is the kind of example that philosophers use when (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Denis Robinson (2007). Human Beings, Human Animals, and Mentalistic Survival. In Dean W. Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, Volume 3. Oxford University Press. 3-32.score: 168.0
    I critically discuss both the particular doctrinal and general meta-philosophical or methodological tenets of Mark Johnston's paper "Human Beings", attending to several weaknesses in his argument. One of the most important amongst them is an apparent reliance on a substitution of identicals within an intensional context as he argues that continuity of functioning brain is essential to the persistence of "Human Beings" as allegedly singled out by his methodology; another equally important is a simple lacuna in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Henry P. Stapp (2009). The Role of Human Beings in the Quantum Universe. World Futures 65 (1):7 – 18.score: 168.0
    A profound change in our scientific understanding of the role of human beings in the unfolding of our streams of conscious experiences was wrought by the 20th-century switch from classical mechanics to quantum mechanics. The streams of consciousness thoughts of human beings were converted from causally inert passive witnesses of the unfolding of a mechanically controlled and causally self-sufficient physical universe into logically needed dynamical inputs into the physical aspects of nature. These physical aspects, as they (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Christopher Lang, Elliott Sober & Karen Strier (2002). Are Human Beings Part of the Rest of Nature? Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):661-671.score: 168.0
    Unified explanations seek to situate the traits of human beings in a causal framework that also explains the trait values found in nonhuman species. Disunified explanations claim that the traits of human beings are due to causal processes not at work in the rest of nature. This paper outlines a methodology for testing hypotheses of these two types. Implications are drawn concerning evolutionary psychology, adaptationism, and anti-adaptationism.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Hans-Peter Kr (1998). The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107 – 119.score: 168.0
    John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right reminder needs a therapeutic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Abraham P. Bos (2010). Aristotle on the Difference Between Plants, Animals, and Human Beings and on the Elements as Instruments of the Soul (De Anima 2.4.415b18). [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 63 (4):821-841.score: 168.0
    Why do all animals possess sense perception while plants don’t? And should the difference in quality of life between human beings and wolves be explained by supposing that wolves have degenerated souls? This paper argues that for Aristotle differences in quality of life among living beings are based on differences in the quality of their soul-principle together with the body that receives the soul. The paper proposes a new interpretation of On the Soul 2.4.415b18: “For all the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Robert Sparrow (2010). Should Human Beings Have Sex? Sexual Dimorphism and Human Enhancement. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):3-12.score: 168.0
    Since the first sex reassignment operations were performed, individual sex has come to be, to some extent at least, a technological artifact. The existence of sperm sorting technology, and of prenatal determination of fetal sex via ultrasound along with the option of termination, means that we now have the power to choose the sex of our children. An influential contemporary line of thought about medical ethics suggests that we should use technology to serve the welfare of individuals and to remove (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Hans-Peter Krüger (1998). The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107-119.score: 168.0
    Abstract John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right reminder needs a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Robin Turner, "Male Logic" and "Women's Intuition" The Split in Our Thinking Between "Masculine" and "Feminine" is Probably as Old as Language Itself. Human Beings Seem..score: 168.0
    The split in our thinking between "masculine" and "feminine" is probably as old as language itself. Human beings seem to have a natural tendency to divide things into pairs: good/bad, light/dark, subject/object and so on. It is not surprising, then, that the male/female or masculine/feminine dichotomy is used to classify things other than men and women. Many languages actually classify all nouns as "masculine" or "feminine" (although not very consistently: for example, the Spanish masculine noun pollo means "hen", (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Peter Baumann (2007). Persons, Human Beings, and Respect. Polish Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):5-17.score: 168.0
    Human dignity seems very important to us. At the same time, the concept ‘human dignity’ is extrordinarily elusive. A good way to approach the questions “What is it?” and “Why is it important?” is to raise another question first: In virtue of what do human beings have dignity? Speciesism - the idea that human beings have a particular dignity because they are humans - does not seem very convincing. A better answer says that (...) beings have dignity because and insofar as they are persons. I discuss several versions of this idea as well as several objections against it. The most promising line of analysis says that human beings cannot survive psychologically without a very basic form of recognition and respect by others. The idea that humans have a very special dignity is the idea that they owe each other this kind of respect. All this also suggests that human dignity is inherently social. Non-social beings do not have dignity - nor do they lack it. It is because we are social animals of a certain kind that we have dignity - not so much because we are rational animals. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Giovanni Felice Azzone (2003). The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.score: 168.0
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael J. Hyde (2011). The Expertise of Human Beings and Depression. Social Epistemology 25 (3):263 - 274.score: 168.0
    Depression is a debilitating condition, but it can also be an awakening: one that calls attention to what is termed dimensions of expertise that come with the spatial and temporal structure of human beings and that are necessary for offering some counter to the debilitating force of the condition. Expertise has a significant ontological status: it is directly associated with who we are as creatures who can hear and respond to the call of conscience, desire acknowledgment and have (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Maria Rita Garbi Novaes, Dirce Guilhem, Elena Barragan & Stewart Mennin (2013). Ethics Education in Research Involving Human Beings in Undergraduate Medicine Curriculum in Brazil. Developing World Bioethics 13 (3):163-168.score: 168.0
    Introduction The Brazilian national curriculum guidelines for undergraduate medicine courses inspired and influenced the groundwork for knowledge acquisition, skills development and the perception of ethical values in the context of professional conduct. Objective The evaluation of ethics education in research involving human beings in undergraduate medicine curriculum in Brazil, both in courses with active learning processes and in those with traditional lecture learning methodologies. Methods Curricula and teaching projects of 175 Brazilian medical schools were analyzed using a retrospective (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Derick Wilson (2011). Unveiling the Past—Preparing the Conditions for Human Beings to Live in the Midst of One Another Again? A Response From Living in Northern Ireland. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (4):333-335.score: 168.0
    Unveiling the Past—Preparing the Conditions for Human Beings to Live in the Midst of One Another Again? A Response From Living in Northern Ireland Content Type Journal Article Category Symposium Pages 333-335 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9334-y Authors Derick Wilson, University of Ulster, School of Education, Coleraine, Co. Londonderry, BT52 1SA UK Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 4.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Stein M. Wivestad (2013). On Becoming Better Human Beings: Six Stories to Live By. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):55-71.score: 168.0
    What are the conditions required for becoming better human beings? What are our limitations and possibilities? I understand “becoming better” as a combined improvement process bringing persons “up from” a negative condition and “up to” a positive one. Today there is a tendency to understand improvement in a one-sided way as a movement up to the mastery of cognitive skills, neglecting the negative conditions that can make these skills mis-educative. I therefore tell six stories in the Western tradition (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Simo Säätelä, Human Beings and Automatons.score: 168.0
    J.S. Mill has formulated a classical statement of the "argument from analogy� concerning knowledge of other minds: "I must either believe them [other human beings] to be alive, or to be automatons� (Mill 1872, 244). It is possible that Wittgenstein had this in mind when writing the following: "I believe he is suffering.�—Do I also believe that he isn"t an automaton? It would go against the grain to use the word in both connexions. (Or is it like this: (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. B. Towers (1981). Medical Experiments on Human Beings. Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (1):19-23.score: 168.0
    Throughout the scientific age it has been increasingly realised that the path to knowledge is through carefully-controlled experimentation. Medicine must never, however, treat human beings as objects, or as the means to achieving increased knowledge. Ultimately the goal of human evolution will be served by the willing collaboration of members of society in the advancement of knowledge through carefully planned experimentation. As of now, however, many safeguards must be built into the system to ensure that no exploitation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. E. Cioflec (2012). On Hannah Arendt: The Worldly In-Between of Human Beings and its Ethical Consequences. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):646-663.score: 168.0
    In this paper, I show how a concept of ethics can be derived from Hannah Arendt’s theory of action in The Human Condition , which contains from her call for action. When she looks at the ‘political actor’, as well as at the concept of ‘political situation’, her ethical claim is first of all the need to take initiative, to act. Hence, ‘political situations’ as she defines them are discussed as common responsibilities. But common responsibility is rooted in the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Karl Hostetler (2010). (Mis)Understanding Human Beings: Theory, Value, and Progress in Education Research. Educational Studies 46 (4):400-415.score: 168.0
    There is renewed interest in what can be called an experimentist approach to education research. The claim is that if researchers would focus on experiments and evidence-based policies and practices, irreversible progress in education can be achieved. This experimentist approach cannot provide the understanding of knowledge and human beings needed for meaningful progress in education. Lacking is adequate appreciation for the role of theory, particularly ethical and other philosophical theory. We especially need a theory of our human (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. David Cockburn (ed.) (1991). Human Beings. Cambridge University Press.score: 164.0
    The contributors to this collection have radically different approaches, some accepting and others denying its validity for a proper understanding of what a...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Richard Schacht (1989). Whither Determinism: On Humean Beings, Human Beings, and Originators. Inquiry 32 (March):55-77.score: 164.0
    Much of this paper is concerned with several issues of considerable importance in assessing the adequacy of Honderich's account of our nature and the persuasiveness of his case for his theory of determinism. First, there are a number of respects in which his treatment of the mental does not do justice to it, chiefly owing to the mental's being abstracted from its larger context in human life, and to neglect of its intimate relation to socially engendered and maintained systems (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Hans-Peter Krüger (2009). The Public Nature of Human Beings. Parallels Between Classical Pragmatisms and Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Iris 1 (1):195-204.score: 164.0
    Though Helmuth Plessner (1892-1985) elaborated his philosophical anthropology independently of the classical pragmatisms, there are many parallels with them. He combined a phenomenology of living beings (a parallel with William James) with a semiotic reconstruction (a parallel with Charles Sanders Peirce) of what we are already using whenever we specify living beings, among them ourselves as human living beings in nature, culture, and society. In Plessner’s distinction between having a body (Körperhaben) and being (or living) a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. M. Vlerick (2012). How Can Human Beings Transgress Their Biologically Based Views? South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):707-735.score: 158.0
    Empirical evidence from developmental psychology and anthropology points out that the human mind is predisposed to conceptualize the world in particular, species-specific ways. These cognitive predispositions lead to universal human commonsense views, often referred to as folk theories. Nevertheless, humans can transgress these views – i.e. they can contradict them with alternative descriptions, they perceive as more accurate – as exemplified in modern sciences. In this paper, I enquire about the cognitive faculties underlying such transgressions. I claim that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Tyler Cowen & Michelle Dawson, What Does the Turing Test Really Mean? And How Many Human Beings (Including Turing) Could Pass?score: 153.3
    The so-called Turing test, as it is usually interpreted, sets a benchmark standard for determining when we might call a machine intelligent. We can call a machine intelligent if the following is satisfied: if a group of wise observers were conversing with a machine through an exchange of typed messages, those observers could not tell whether they were talking to a human being or to a machine. To pass the test, the machine has to be intelligent but it also (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. David S. Oderberg (1989). Johnston on Human Beings. Journal of Philosophy 86 (March):137-41.score: 152.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Steve Stewart-Williams (2008). Human Beings as Evolved Nepotists. Human Nature 19 (4):414-425.score: 152.0
    Inclusive fitness theory provides a compelling explanation for the evolution of altruism among kin. However, a completely satisfactory account of non-kin altruism is still lacking. The present study compared the level of altruism found among siblings with that found among friends and mates and sought to reconcile the findings with an evolutionary explanation for human altruism. Participants (163 males and 156 females) completed a questionnaire about help given to a sibling, friend, or mate. Overall, participants gave friends and mates (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Christopher Bertram (2013). Property in the Moral Life of Human Beings. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):404-424.score: 152.0
    Liberal egalitarian political philosophers have often argued that private property is a legal convention dependent on the state and that complaints about taxation from entitlement theorists are therefore based on a conceptual mistake. But our capacity to grasp and use property concepts seems too embedded in human nature for this to be correct. This essay argues that many standard arguments that property is constitutively a legal convention fail, but that the opposition between conventionalists and natural rights theorists is outmoded. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Orivaldo Pimentel Lopes Junior (2010). Ser Humano e Natureza na Teologia Cristã: “Quando fizestes a um lençol freático, a mim me fizestes” (Human being and Nature in Christian Theology:“as you do something to the water table you do it to me”) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n17p79. [REVIEW] Horizonte 8 (17):79-87.score: 150.7
    A utilização de um texto bíblico por um senador para justificar sua oposição a medidas de proteção ambiental é pretexto para uma série de considerações acerca da Teologia cristã sobre o meio-ambiente, e a relação entre religião e sociedade. Três questões são levantadas: a pretensa separação dos humanos da natureza, a pretensa homogeneização do "ser humano", e a pretensa simplicidade da interpretação teológica de um texto sagrado. O emprego dos verbos hebraicos KABASH e RADAHA abre uma discussão sobre o sentido (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Stevan Harnad, First Person Singular: Review Of: Brian Rotman: Becoming Beside Ourselves: Alphabet, Ghosts, Distributed Human Beings. [REVIEW]score: 148.0
    Brian Rotman argues that (one) “mind” and (one) “god” are only conceivable, literally, because of (alphabetic) literacy, which allowed us to designate each of these ghosts as an incorporeal, speaker-independent “I” (or, in the case of infinity, a notional agent that goes on counting forever). I argue that to have a mind is to have the capacity to feel. No one can be sure which organisms feel, hence have minds, but it seems likely that one-celled organisms and plants do not, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Michel Dion (2000). The Moral Status of Non-Human Beings and Their Ecosystems. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (2):221 – 229.score: 146.0
    Environmental ethics is generally searching for the intrinsic value in natural beings. However, there are very few holistic models trying to reflect the various dimensions of the experience-to-be a natural being. We are searching for that intrinsic value, in order to determine which species are holders of rights. In this article, I suggest a set of moral and rational principles to be used for identifying the intrinsic value of a given species and for comparing it to that of other (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Keith Breen (2007). Work and Emancipatory Practice: Towards a Recovery of Human Beings' Productive Capacities. Res Publica 13 (4):381-414.score: 146.0
    This article argues that productive work represents a mode of human flourishing unfortunately neglected in much current political theorizing. Focusing on Habermasian critical theory, I contend that Habermas’s dualist theory of society, with its underpinning distinction between communicative and instrumental reason, excludes work and the economy from ethical reflection. To avoid this uncritical turn, we need a concept of work that retains a core emancipatory referent. This, I claim, is provided by Alasdair MacIntyre’s notion of ‹practice’. The notion of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Robert B. Louden (2000). Kant's Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. Oxford University Press.score: 146.0
    This is the first book-length study in any language to examine in detail and critically assess the second part of Kant's ethics-<span class='Hi'></span>-an empirical,<span class='Hi'></span> impure part,<span class='Hi'></span> which determines how best to apply pure principles to the human situation.<span class='Hi'></span> Drawing attention to Kant's under-explored impure ethics,<span class='Hi'></span> this revealing investigation refutes the common and long-standing misperception that Kants ethics advocates empty formalism.<span class='Hi'></span> Making detailed use of a variety of Kantian texts never before translated into English,<span class='Hi'></span> (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. J. Savulescu (1999). Should We Clone Human Beings? Cloning as a Source of Tissue for Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):87-95.score: 146.0
    The most publicly justifiable application of human cloning, if there is one at all, is to provide self-compatible cells or tissues for medical use, especially transplantation. Some have argued that this raises no new ethical issues above those raised by any form of embryo experimentation. I argue that this research is less morally problematic than other embryo research. Indeed, it is not merely morally permissible but morally required that we employ cloning to produce embryos or fetuses for the sake (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Helen Oppenheimer (2006). What a Piece of Work: On Being Human. Imprint Academic.score: 144.0
    This is a small book on a large subject: What is special about human beings? Hamlet mused, ?What a piece of work is man! How noble in reason! how like a god!? but went on to speak of ?this quintessence of dust?. Helen Oppenheimer prefers to start with the dust and move to the glory: we really are animals ? and from these animals has come Shakespeare. People are indeed ?miserable sinners? ? and also magnificent creatures. The author (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Thomas Engel & Ulrike Henckel (2008). Human Beings, Technology and the Idea of Man. Poiesis and Praxis 5 (3-4):249-263.score: 142.0
    Since ancient times philosophy has dealt with the relation between technology and man. Nowadays this is especially true in the context of the philosophy of technology. Technology is interpreted as an anthropological constant to construct an environment in which man can survive. Acting in the field of technology is to act rationally with a purpose, i.e., in the framework of a means-end relation, and it is employed for coping with experiences (Widerfahrnisse) by means of using tools. Like technology, language can (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Bruce Silver (2014). Dante's Paradiso: No Human Beings Allowed. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):110-127.score: 142.0
    “But when you meet her again,” he observed, “in Heaven, you, too, will be changed. You will see her spiritualized, with spiritual eyes.”1Dante is not a philosopher, although George Santayana sees him as one among a very few philosophical poets.2 The Divine Comedy deals in terza rima with issues that are philosophically urgent, including the relation between reasoning well and happiness.3And as one of the few great epics in Western literature, the Comedy offers its readers the pleasures of world-class poetry, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Derek Parfit (2012). We Are Not Human Beings. Philosophy 87 (01):5-28.score: 140.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Mark Johnston (1987). Human Beings. Journal of Philosophy 84 (February):59-83.score: 140.0
  47. John Hacker-Wright (2012). Teichmann , Roger . Nature, Reason, and the Good Life: Ethics for Human Beings . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 224. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (3):637-641.score: 140.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Helen Thornton (2005). State of Nature or Eden?: Thomas Hobbes and His Contemporaries on the Natural Condition of Human Beings. University of Rochester Press.score: 140.0
    State of nature or Eden? -- Hobbes' state of nature as an account of the fall? -- Hobbes' own belief or unbelief -- The contemporary reaction to Leviathan -- Hobbes and commentaries on Genesis -- A note on method and chapter order -- Good and evil -- Hobbes on good and evil -- The 'seditious doctrines' of the schoolmen -- The contemporary reaction -- The scriptural account -- The state of nature as an account of the fall? -- Equality and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. David Cockburn (2001). Language, Belief and Human Beings. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Minds and Persons. Cambridge University Press. 141-157.score: 140.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2002). On Cloning Human Beings. Bioethics 16 (3):246–265.score: 140.0
1 — 50 / 1000