Search results for 'Human beings History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.score: 333.0
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance (...)
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  2. Felipe Fernández-Armesto (2004). So You Think You're Human?: A Brief History of Humankind. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    So You Think You're Human? confronts these problems from a historical perspective, showing how our current understanding of what it means to be human has been ...
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  3. Dominick LaCapra (2009). History and its Limits: Human, Animal, Violence. Cornell University Press.score: 282.0
    Introduction For Freud, beyond the explanatory limits of the pleasure principle lay the repetition compulsion, the death drive, and trauma with its ...
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  4. Jeffrey T. Nealon (1997). History as Rhetoric: Style, Narrative, and Persuasion. Ronald H. Carpenter. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 1995. Pp. 350. $39.95. Ronald H. Carpenter's History as Rhetoric: Style, Narrative, and Persuasion Grows Out of the Notion That Human Beings Are Story-Telling. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Rhetoric 30 (1).score: 261.0
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  5. Ye Zhiqing (2008). The Existence of Human Beings in the View of Materialism: Criticiques on the Philosophical History of The Holy Family. Modern Philosophy 1:009.score: 261.0
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  6. Felipe Fernández-Armesto (2004). Humankind: A Brief History. Oxford University Press.score: 252.0
    The discovery that the DNA of chimpanzees and humans is incredibly similar, sharing 98% of the same code, suggests that there is very little different--or special--about the human animal. Likewise, advances in artificial intelligence mean that humans no longer have exclusive access to reason, consciousness and imagination. Indeed, the harder we cling to the concept of humanity, the more slippery it becomes. But if it breaks down altogether, what will this mean for human values, human rights, and (...)
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  7. Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.score: 234.0
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of (...) beings. All these associations were well aware of the crimes by medicine, in particular by the accused Nazi physicians at the Nuremberg Doctors Trial (1946/47, sentence: August 1947). During the first conference of the World Medical Association (September 1947) issues of medical ethics played a major role: and a new document was drafted concerning the values of the medical profession. After the catastrophe of the War and the criminal activities of scientists, the late 1940s saw increased scrutiny paid to fundamental questions of human rights and medical ethics, which are still highly relevant for today’s medicine and morality. The article focuses on the development of medical ethics and human rights reflected in the statement of important persons, codes and institutions in the field. (shrink)
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  8. Lloyd J. Averill (1974). The Problem of Being Human. Valley Forge [Pa.]Judson Press.score: 234.0
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  9. Timothy Clack (2009). Ancestral Roots: Modern Living and Human Evolution. Macmillan.score: 225.0
    Human evolution explains how we have found ourselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Issues of modern living; depression, obesity, and environmental destruction, can be understood in relation to our evolutionary past. This book shows how an awareness of this past and its relation to the present can help limit their impact on the future.
     
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  10. Peter Langford (1986). Modern Philosophies of Human Nature: Their Emergence From Christian Thought. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic.score: 216.0
    Chapter 1 : Introduction General Argument My aim is to survey some of the most influential philosophical writers on human nature from the time that ...
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  11. Erica Fudge, Ruth Gilbert & Susan Wiseman (eds.) (1999). At the Borders of the Human: Beasts, Bodies, and Natural Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Palgrave.score: 216.0
    What is, what was the human? This book argues that the making of the human as it is now understood implies a renogotiation of the relationship between the self and the world. The development of Renaissance technologies of difference such as mapping, colonialism and anatomy paradoxically also illuminated the similarities between human and non-human. This collection considers the borders between humans and their imagined others: animals, women, native subjects, machines. It examines border creatures (hermaphrodites, wildmen, and (...)
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  12. Carolyn Merchant (2003). Reinventing Eden: The Fate of Nature in Western Culture. Routledge.score: 210.0
    Visionary quests to return to the Garden of Eden have shaped Western culture from Columbus' voyages to today's tropical island retreats. Few narratives are so powerful - and, as Carolyn Merchant shows, so misguided and destructive - as the dream of recapturing a lost paradise. A sweeping account of these quixotic endeavors by one of America's leading environmentalists, Reinventing Eden traces the idea of rebuilding the primeval garden from its origins to its latest incarnations in shopping malls, theme parks and (...)
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  13. Leon Pompa (1990). Human Nature and Historical Knowledge: Hume, Hegel, and Vico. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    This book presents a study of the nature and conditions of historical knowledge, conducted through a study of the relevant theories of Hume, Hegel and Vico. It is usually thought that in order to establish historical facts, we have to have a theory of human nature to support our arguments. Hume, Hegel and Vico all subscribed to this view, and are therefore discussed in detail. Professor Pompa goes on to argue that there is in fact no way of discovering (...)
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  14. Pietro Gori (2009). “Sounding Out Idols”: Knowledge, History and Metaphysics in Human, All Too Human and Twilight of the Idols. In Volker Gerhard & Renate Reschke (eds.), Nietzscheforschung, vol. 16.score: 207.0
    Twilight of the Idols has a main role in Nietzsche’s work, since it represents the opening writing of his project of Transvaluation of all values. The task of this essay is sounding out idols, i.e. to disclose their lack of content, their being hollow. The theme of eternal idols is in this work strictly related to the idea of a ‘true’ world and, consequently, a study on this latter notion can contribute to a better comprehension of what does that emptiness (...)
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  15. Erica Fudge (1999/2002). Perceiving Animals: Humans and Beasts in Early Modern English Culture. University of Illinois Press.score: 207.0
    When the human understanding of beasts in the past is studied, what are revealed is not only the foundations of our own perception of animals, but humans contemplating their own status. This book argues that what is revealed in a wide range of writing from the early modern period is a recurring attempt to separate the human from the beast. Looking at the representation of the animal in the law, religious writings, literary representation, science and political ideas, what (...)
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  16. George W. Morgan (1968). The Human Predicament: Dissolution and Wholeness. Providence, Brown University Press.score: 207.0
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  17. James H. Saunders (1974). Frontiers of Aquarius: The Human Situation: A New Dimension. G. Chapman.score: 207.0
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  18. Lee Alan Dugatkin (2009). Mr. Jefferson and the Giant Moose: Natural History in Early America. The University of Chicago Press.score: 201.0
    Capturing the essence of the origin and evolution of the so-called "degeneracy debates," over whether the flora and fauna of America (including Native ...
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  19. Michael Tobias (1985). After Eden: History, Ecology, and Conscience. Avant Books.score: 201.0
     
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  20. Holmes Rolston, Iii (1999). Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History. Cambridge University Press.score: 195.0
    Holmes Rolston challenges the sociobiological orthodoxy that would naturalize science, ethics, and religion. The book argues that genetic processes are not blind, selfish, and contingent, and that nature is therefore not value-free. The author examines the emergence of complex biodiversity through evolutionary history. Especially remarkable in this narrative is the genesis of human beings with their capacities for science, ethics, and religion. A major conceptual task of the book is to relate cultural genesis to natural genesis. There (...)
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  21. Kim Sterelny, Review Genes, Memes and Human History.score: 189.0
    Archaeology, of all the human sciences, can dodge this problem the least, and the great virtue of Shennan’s Genes, Memes and Human History is that he confronts it directly. For though humans are now both cultural and ecological beings, it was not always so. Once our hominid ancestors had a social organisation and a material culture roughly equivalent to that of today’s chimpanzees. Chimps are not encultured in the sense that we are encultured: their social life (...)
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  22. Ėduard Viktorovich Bezcherevnykh (1972). The Secret of Man's Being. Moscow,Novosti.score: 189.0
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  23. Tamara Giles-Vernick (2002). Cutting the Vines of the Past: Environmental Histories of the Central African Rain Forest. University Press of Virginia.score: 183.0
    Cutting the Vines of the Past offers a novel argument: African ways of seeing and interpreting their environments and past are not only critical to how ...
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  24. Inder Marwah (2013). Elateres Motiva: From the Good Will to the Good Human Being. Kantian Review 18 (3):413-437.score: 181.0
    Kant's ethics has long been bedevilled by a peculiar tension. While his practical philosophy describes the moral obligations incumbent on all free, rational beings, Kant also understands moral anthropology as addressing to our moral advancement. How are we to reconcile Kant's Critical account of a transcendentally free human will with his developmental view of anthropology, history and education as assisting in our collective progress towards moral ends? I argue that Kant in fact distinguishes between the objective determination (...)
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  25. W. K. C. Guthrie (1957/1986). In the Beginning: Some Greek Views on the Origins of Life and the Early State of Man. Greenwood Press.score: 180.0
  26. S. K. Bondyreva (2006). Chelovek: (Vkhozhdenie V Mir). Modėk.score: 180.0
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  27. Gerald S. Graham (1967/1968). The Secular Abyss. Wheaton, Ill.,Theosophical Pub. House.score: 180.0
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  28. Paulos Gregorios (1980/1988). Cosmic Man: The Divine Presence: The Theology of St. Gregory of Nyssa (Ca. 330 to Ca. 395 A.D.). Paragon House.score: 180.0
  29. Moṭi Yardeni (2007). Ḳofim ʻim Shigaʻon Gadlut: O, Zeh Pashuṭ Yoter Mi-Mah She-Ḥashavtem. Shalhevet.score: 180.0
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  30. Giovanni Felice Azzone (2003). The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.score: 177.0
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic (...)
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  31. John Carroll (1974). Break-Out From the Crystal Palace. Boston,Routledge & K. Paul.score: 174.0
    Introduction: liberal-rationalism and the progress model i This study stands primarily as an essay in morals. It is governed by Nietzsche's contention that ...
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  32. Jacob Bronowski (1974). The Ascent of Man. Boston,Little, Brown.score: 174.0
    First published in 1973, it is considered one of the first works of "popular science", illuminating the historical and social context of scientific development ...
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  33. Jacob Bronowski (1973). The Ascent of Man. London,British Broadcasting Corporation.score: 174.0
    First published in 1973, it is considered one of the first works of "popular science", illuminating the historical and social context of scientific development ...
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  34. Isaiah Berlin (1997/1998). The Proper Study of Mankind: An Anthology of Essays. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.score: 174.0
  35. Robert T. Francoeur (1970). Evolving World, Converging Man. New York,Holt, Rinehart and Winston.score: 174.0
     
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  36. Louis Joseph Halle (1977). Out of Chaos. Houghton Mifflin.score: 174.0
     
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  37. Stanisław Kowalczyk (2011). Wspólczesny Kryzys Ideowo-Aksjologiczny. Wydawn. Kul.score: 174.0
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  38. James Burnett Monboddo (1779/1977). Antient Metaphysics. Garland Pub..score: 174.0
  39. Michael Pauen (2007). Was Ist der Mensch?: Die Entdeckung der Natur des Geistes. Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt.score: 174.0
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  40. Forrest H. Peterson (1970). A Philosophy of Man and Society. New York,Philosophical Library.score: 174.0
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  41. Daniel S. Ratnathicam (1967). Honest to Man. Colombo, Ceylon Rationalist Association.score: 174.0
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  42. Norman Ravitch (1973). Classical Man. Belmont, Calif.,Wadsworth Pub. Co..score: 174.0
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  43. Evgeniĭ Frolovich Solopov (2008). Chelovek I Obshchestvo V Ikh Istorii. Vysshiĭ Institut Upravlenii͡a.score: 174.0
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  44. Henry Osborn Taylor (1969). A Historian's Creed. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.score: 174.0
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  45. Allen Wheelis (1971). The End of the Modern Age. New York,Basic Books.score: 174.0
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  46. Christopher Cordner (2005). Life and Death Matters: Losing a Sense of the Value of Human Beings. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):207-226.score: 168.0
    The essay combines a specific and a more general theme. In attacking ‘the doctrine of the sanctity of human life’ Singer takes himself thereby to be opposing the conviction that human life has special value. I argue that this conviction goes deep in our lives in many ways that do not depend on what Singer identifies as central to that ‘doctrine’, and that his attack therefore misses its main target. I argue more generally that Singer’s own moral philosophy (...)
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  47. Weixiang Ding (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13-37.score: 168.0
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, “ ming 命 (destiny or decrees)” and “ tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)” mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from “ ling 令 (decrees),” which evolved from “ wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)” into “ tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees),” and then became “ ming ” from a throne because of the decisive role of “heavenly decrees” over a throne. “ Ming ” and (...)
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  48. Armin Grunwald & Yannick Julliard (2007). Nanotechnology – Steps Towards Understanding Human Beings as Technology? NanoEthics 1 (2):77-87.score: 168.0
    Far-reaching promises made by nanotechnology have raised the question of whether we are on the way to understanding human beings more and more as belonging to the realm of technology. In this paper, an increasing need to understand the technological re-conceptualization of human beings is diagnosed whenever increasingly “technical” interpretations of humans as mechanical entities are disseminated. And this can be observed at present in the framework of nanobiotechnology, a foremost “technical” self-description where a technical language (...)
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  49. Ding Weixiang & Huang Deyuan (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13 - 37.score: 168.0
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, "ming 命 (destiny or decrees)" and "tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)" mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from "ling 令 (decrees)," which evolved from "wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)" into "tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees)," and then became "ming" from a throne because of the decisive role of "heavenly decrees" over a throne. "Ming" and "tian ming" have different definitions: "Ming" represented the limits (...)
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  50. Diana Fuss (ed.) (1996). Human, All Too Human. Routledge.score: 164.0
    The question of what it means to be human has never before been more difficult and more contested. The human, with a complicated social history that his rarely been examined, remains entrenched in traditional Enlightenment thinking. Human, All Too Human considers how we might radicalize our notion of the human. Can the human be thought outside humanism? Any rethinking of the human places us immediately inside an ever-widening field of contrasting labels: animate (...)
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