Search results for 'Human beings Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jaroslav Pecen (ed.) (1988). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Beings: Papers by Czechoslovak Aut[H]Ors of the Main Theme of the Xviii. World Congres[S] of Philosophy. Academia - Publishing House of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences.score: 615.0
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  2. Li Shuyou (1988). On Characteristics of Human Beings in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):221-253.score: 444.0
  3. Michel Dion (2000). Existential Philosophy in an Ecological Perspective. An Alternative View of Non-Human Beings. Dialogue and Universalism 10:125.score: 435.0
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  4. V. Lazutka (ed.) (1988). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Beings: Towards the Xviiith World Congress of Philosophy, Brighton, United Kingdom, August 21-27, 1988. [REVIEW] Lithuanian Section of the Philosophical Society of the U.S.S.R..score: 435.0
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  5. Ross Fitzgerald (ed.) (1978). What It Means to Be Human: Essays in Philosophical Anthropology, Political Philosophy, and Social Psychology. Pergamon Press Australia.score: 429.0
  6. Christopher Cordner (2005). Life and Death Matters: Losing a Sense of the Value of Human Beings. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):207-226.score: 381.0
    The essay combines a specific and a more general theme. In attacking ‘the doctrine of the sanctity of human life’ Singer takes himself thereby to be opposing the conviction that human life has special value. I argue that this conviction goes deep in our lives in many ways that do not depend on what Singer identifies as central to that ‘doctrine’, and that his attack therefore misses its main target. I argue more generally that Singer’s own moral (...) affords only an impoverished and distorted sense of the value of human life and human beings. In purporting to dig below the supposedly illusion–ridden surface of our thinking about value, Singer in fact often leads us away from the robust terrain of our lived experience into rhetorical, and sometimes brutal, fantasy. (shrink)
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  7. Weixiang Ding (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13-37.score: 345.0
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, “ ming 命 (destiny or decrees)” and “ tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)” mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from “ ling 令 (decrees),” which evolved from “ wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)” into “ tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees),” and then became “ ming ” from a throne because of the decisive role of “heavenly decrees” over a throne. “ Ming ” and (...)
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  8. Ding Weixiang & Huang Deyuan (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13 - 37.score: 345.0
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, "ming 命 (destiny or decrees)" and "tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)" mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from "ling 令 (decrees)," which evolved from "wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)" into "tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees)," and then became "ming" from a throne because of the decisive role of "heavenly decrees" over a throne. "Ming" and "tian ming" have different definitions: "Ming" represented the limits (...)
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  9. David Bakhurst (1995). Social Being and the Human Essence: An Unresolved Issue in Soviet Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 47 (1-2):3-60.score: 327.0
    This is a transcription of a debate on the concept of a person conducted in Moscow in 1983. David Bakhurst argues that Evald Ilyenkov's social constructivist conception of personhood, founded on Marx's thesis that the human essence is the ensemble of social relations, is either false or trivially true. F. T. Mikhailov, V. S. Bibler, V. A. Lektorsky and V. V. Davydov critically assess Bakhurst's arguments, elucidate and contextualize Ilyenkov's views, and defend, in contrasting ways, the claim that (...) individuals are socially constituted beings. Issues discussed include: the concepts of activity (dejatel'nost') and community (obenija) and their relevance to the notions of mind and personhood; self-consciousness and its relation to personal identity; naturalism in Soviet thought. Translated from the Russian. (shrink)
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  10. Adam Etinson (2010). To Be or Not to Be: Charles Beitz on the Philosophy of Human Rights. Res Publica 16 (4):441-448.score: 299.0
    This is a review article of Charles Beitz's 2009 book on the philosophy of human rights, The Idea of Human Rights. The article provides a charitable overview of the book's main arguments, but also raises some doubts about the depth of the distinction between Beitz's 'practical' approach to humans rights and its 'naturalistic' counterparts.
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  11. Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.score: 297.0
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's our fault -- (...)
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  12. Hunter Brown & Dennis L. Hudecki (1997). Images of the Human: The Philosophy of the Human Person in a Religious Context. International Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2).score: 297.0
    Images of the human is the collective effort of thirteen philosophy professors to address the questions human beings have been asking for centuries. The book presents selections from the major works of eighteen of the best-known philosophers from ancient to modern times. Each chapter focuses on the writings of a different philosopher - from Plato to Nietzsche, Augustine to Sartre - and includes an introduction and critical comentary.
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  13. David Bakhurst, F. T. Mikhailov, V. S. Bibler, V. A. Lektorsky & V. V. Davydov (1995). Social Being and the Human Essence: An Unresolved Issue in Soviet Philosophy. A Dialogue with Russian Philosophers Conducted by David Bakhurst. Studies in East European Thought 47 (1/2):3 - 60.score: 291.0
    This is a transcription of a debate on the concept of a person conducted in Moscow in 1983. David Bakhurst argues that Evald Ilyenkov's social constructivist conception of personhood, founded on Marx's thesis that the human essence is 'the ensemble of social relations', is either false or trivially true. F. T. Mikhailov, V. S. Bibler, V. A. Lektorsky and V. V. Davydov critically assess Bakhurst's arguments, elucidate and contextualize Ilyenkov's views, and defend, in contrasting ways, the claim that (...)
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  14. Holger Zaborowski (2010). Robert Spaemann's Philosophy of the Human Person: Nature, Freedom, and the Critique of Modernity. Oxford University Press.score: 285.0
    The German philosopher Robert Spaemann provides an important contribution to a number of contemporary debates in philosophy and theology, opening up possibilities for conversation between these disciplines. He engages in a dialogue with classical and contemporary positions and often formulates important and original insights which lie beyond common alternatives. In this study Holger Zaborowski provides an analysis of the most important features of Spaemann's philosophy and shows the unity of his thought. The question 'Who is a person?' is (...)
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  15. Gerald L. Bruns (2011). On Ceasing to Be Human. Stanford University Press.score: 279.0
    Prologue : on the freedom of non-identity -- Otherwise than human (toward sovereignty) -- What is human recognition? (on zones of indistinction) -- Desubjectivation (Michel Foucault's aesthetics of experience) -- Becoming animal (some simple ways) -- Derrida's cat (who am I?).
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  16. Erica Fudge, Ruth Gilbert & Susan Wiseman (eds.) (1999). At the Borders of the Human: Beasts, Bodies, and Natural Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Palgrave.score: 273.0
    What is, what was the human? This book argues that the making of the human as it is now understood implies a renogotiation of the relationship between the self and the world. The development of Renaissance technologies of difference such as mapping, colonialism and anatomy paradoxically also illuminated the similarities between human and non-human. This collection considers the borders between humans and their imagined others: animals, women, native subjects, machines. It examines border creatures (hermaphrodites, wildmen, and (...)
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  17. Steve Fuller (2012). The Art of Being Human: A Project for General Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):113-123.score: 271.0
    Throughout the medieval and modern periods, in various sacred and secular guises, the unification of all forms of knowledge under the rubric of ‘science’ has been taken as the prerogative of humanity as a species. However, as our sense of species privilege has been called increasingly into question, so too has the very salience of ‘humanity’ and ‘science’ as general categories, let alone ones that might bear some essential relationship to each other. After showing how the ascendant Stanford School in (...)
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  18. P. M. S. Hacker (2009). Philosophy: A Contribution, Not to Human Knowledge, but to Human Understanding. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):129-.score: 270.0
    P. M. S. Hacker 1. The poverty of philosophy as a science Throughout its history philosophy has been thought to be a member of a community of intellectual disciplines united by their common pursuit of knowledge. It has sometimes been thought to be the queen of the sciences, at other times merely their under-labourer. But irrespective of its social status, it was held to be a participant in the quest for knowledge – a cognitive discipline. Cognitive disciplines may (...)
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  19. E. J. Applewhite (1991). Paradise Mislaid: Birth, Death & the Human Predicament of Being Biological. St. Martin's Press.score: 264.0
     
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  20. Lloyd J. Averill (1974). The Problem of Being Human. Valley Forge [Pa.]Judson Press.score: 264.0
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  21. Christopher Gill (ed.) (1990). The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 263.0
    This collection of essays explores analogous issues in classical and modern philosophy that relate to the concepts of person and human being. A primary focus is whether there are such analogous issues, and whether we can find in ancient philosophy a notion that is comparable to "person" as understood in modern philosophy. Essays on modern philosophy reappraise the validity of the notion of person, while essays on classical philosophy take up the related questions of (...)
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  22. Christopher Lang, Elliott Sober & Karen Strier (2002). Are Human Beings Part of the Rest of Nature? Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):661-671.score: 261.0
    Unified explanations seek to situate the traits of human beings in a causal framework that also explains the trait values found in nonhuman species. Disunified explanations claim that the traits of human beings are due to causal processes not at work in the rest of nature. This paper outlines a methodology for testing hypotheses of these two types. Implications are drawn concerning evolutionary psychology, adaptationism, and anti-adaptationism.
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  23. Joseph Cropsey (1995). Plato's World: Man's Place in the Cosmos. University of Chicago Press.score: 261.0
    In this culmination of a lifetime's study, Joseph Cropsey examines the crucial relationship between Plato's conception of the nature of the universe and his moral and political thought. Cropsey interprets seven of Plato's dialogues-- Theaetetus , Euthyphro , Sophist , Statesman , Apology , Crito , and Phaedo --in light of their dramatic consecutiveness and thus as a conceptual and dramatic whole. The cosmos depicted by Plato in these dialogues, Cropsey argues, is often unreasonable, and populated by human (...) unaided by gods and dealt with equivocally by nature. Masterfully leading the reader through the seven scenes of the drama, Cropsey shows how they are, to an astonishing degree, concerned with the resources available to help us survive in such a world. This is a world--and a Plato--quite at odds with most other portraits. Much more than a summary of Plato's thinking, this book is an eloquent, sometimes amusing, often moving guide to the paradoxes and insights of Plato's philosophy. (shrink)
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  24. Peter Baumann (2007). Persons, Human Beings, and Respect. Polish Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):5-17.score: 261.0
    Human dignity seems very important to us. At the same time, the concept ‘human dignity’ is extrordinarily elusive. A good way to approach the questions “What is it?” and “Why is it important?” is to raise another question first: In virtue of what do human beings have dignity? Speciesism - the idea that human beings have a particular dignity because they are humans - does not seem very convincing. A better answer says that (...) beings have dignity because and insofar as they are persons. I discuss several versions of this idea as well as several objections against it. The most promising line of analysis says that human beings cannot survive psychologically without a very basic form of recognition and respect by others. The idea that humans have a very special dignity is the idea that they owe each other this kind of respect. All this also suggests that human dignity is inherently social. Non-social beings do not have dignity - nor do they lack it. It is because we are social animals of a certain kind that we have dignity - not so much because we are rational animals. (shrink)
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  25. Giovanni Felice Azzone (2003). The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.score: 261.0
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic (...)
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  26. Stein M. Wivestad (2013). On Becoming Better Human Beings: Six Stories to Live By. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):55-71.score: 261.0
    What are the conditions required for becoming better human beings? What are our limitations and possibilities? I understand “becoming better” as a combined improvement process bringing persons “up from” a negative condition and “up to” a positive one. Today there is a tendency to understand improvement in a one-sided way as a movement up to the mastery of cognitive skills, neglecting the negative conditions that can make these skills mis-educative. I therefore tell six stories in the Western tradition (...)
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  27. Niklas Luhmann (1989). Ecological Communication. Polity Press.score: 261.0
    Niklas Luhmann is widely recognized as one of the most original thinkers in the social sciences today. This major new work further develops the theories of the author by offering a challenging analysis of the relationship between society and the environment. Luhmann extends the concept of "ecology" to refer to any analysis that looks at connections between social systems and the surrounding environment. He traces the development of the notion of "environment" from the medieval idea--which encompasses both human and (...)
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  28. E. Cioflec (2012). On Hannah Arendt: The Worldly In-Between of Human Beings and its Ethical Consequences. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):646-663.score: 261.0
    In this paper, I show how a concept of ethics can be derived from Hannah Arendt’s theory of action in The Human Condition , which contains from her call for action. When she looks at the ‘political actor’, as well as at the concept of ‘political situation’, her ethical claim is first of all the need to take initiative, to act. Hence, ‘political situations’ as she defines them are discussed as common responsibilities. But common responsibility is rooted in the (...)
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  29. Nikolay Omelchenko (2008). The Possibility of Integral Philosophy of Human Being. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:167-174.score: 250.0
    The paper discusses a possibility of integral combination of various approaches for the adequate understanding of human being. In this regard, I analyze the feeling of love in the context of rational cognition and also suggest a secular interpretation of religious images and symbols that allow us to understand well-known heuristic and moral notions in a new light.
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  30. Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (1995). Making Sense of Humanity and Other Philosophical Papers, 1982-1993. Cambridge University Press.score: 246.0
    This new volume of philosophical papers by Bernard Williams is divided into three sections: the first Action, Freedom, Responsibility, the second Philosophy, Evolution and the Human Sciences; in which appears the essay which gives the collection its title; and the third Ethics, which contains essays closely related to his 1983 book Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. Like the two earlier volumes of Williams's papers published by Cambridge University Press, Problems of the Self and Moral Luck, this (...)
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  31. Vanessa Lemm (2009). Nietzsche's Animal Philosophy: Culture, Politics, and the Animality of the Human Being. Fordham University Press.score: 246.0
    The animal in Nietzsche's philosophy -- Culture and civilization -- Politics and promise -- Culture and economy -- Giving and forgiving -- Animality, creativity, and historicity -- Animality, language, and truth -- Biopolitics and the question of animal life.
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  32. Robert B. Louden (2000). Kant's Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. Oxford University Press.score: 246.0
    This is the first book-length study in any language to examine in detail and critically assess the second part of Kant's ethics-<span class='Hi'></span>-an empirical,<span class='Hi'></span> impure part,<span class='Hi'></span> which determines how best to apply pure principles to the human situation.<span class='Hi'></span> Drawing attention to Kant's under-explored impure ethics,<span class='Hi'></span> this revealing investigation refutes the common and long-standing misperception that Kants ethics advocates empty formalism.<span class='Hi'></span> Making detailed use of a variety of Kantian texts never before translated into English,<span class='Hi'></span> (...)
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  33. M. Vlerick (2012). How Can Human Beings Transgress Their Biologically Based Views? South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):707-735.score: 246.0
    Empirical evidence from developmental psychology and anthropology points out that the human mind is predisposed to conceptualize the world in particular, species-specific ways. These cognitive predispositions lead to universal human commonsense views, often referred to as folk theories. Nevertheless, humans can transgress these views – i.e. they can contradict them with alternative descriptions, they perceive as more accurate – as exemplified in modern sciences. In this paper, I enquire about the cognitive faculties underlying such transgressions. I claim that (...)
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  34. John Dupré (2001). Human Nature and the Limits of Science. Oxford University Press.score: 243.0
    John Dupre warns that our understanding of human nature is being distorted by two faulty and harmful forms of pseudo-scientific thinking. Not just in the academic world but in everyday life, we find one set of experts who seek to explain the ends at which humans aim in terms of evolutionary theory, while the other set uses economic models to give rules of how we act to achieve those ends. Dupre demonstrates that these theorists' explanations do not work and (...)
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  35. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 239.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
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  36. Dmytro Drozdovsʹkyĭ (2006). Kod Maĭbutnʹoho: Kryza Li͡udyny V Evropeĭsʹkiĭ Filosofiï Vid Ekzystent͡sializmu Do Ukraïnsʹkoho Shistdesi͡atnyt͡stva = Code of the Future: The Crisis of Human Being in the European Philosophy From Existentialism to the Period of the Ukrainian ʻsixties. Vsesvit.score: 239.0
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  37. David S. Oderberg (1989). Johnston on Human Beings. Journal of Philosophy 86 (March):137-41.score: 237.0
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  38. Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.score: 237.0
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance the quality (...)
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  39. Christopher Bertram (2013). Property in the Moral Life of Human Beings. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):404-424.score: 237.0
    Liberal egalitarian political philosophers have often argued that private property is a legal convention dependent on the state and that complaints about taxation from entitlement theorists are therefore based on a conceptual mistake. But our capacity to grasp and use property concepts seems too embedded in human nature for this to be correct. This essay argues that many standard arguments that property is constitutively a legal convention fail, but that the opposition between conventionalists and natural rights theorists is outmoded. (...)
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  40. James S. Trefil (2004). Human Nature: A Blueprint for Managing the Earth--By People, for People. Times Books/Henry Holt.score: 237.0
    A radical approach to the environment which argues that by harnessing the power of science for human benefit, we can have a healthier planet As a prizewinning theoretical physicist and an outspoken advocate for scientific literacy, James Trefil has long been the public's guide to a better understanding of the world. In this provocative book, Trefil looks squarely at our environmental future and finds-contrary to popular wisdom-reason to celebrate. For too long, Trefil argues, humans have treated nature as something (...)
     
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  41. Paul Ricoeur (1988). The Human Being as the Subject Matter of Philosophy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 14 (2):203-215.score: 232.0
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  42. Chung-ying Cheng (1987). Confucius, Heidegger, and the Philosophy of the I Ching: A Comparative Inquiry Into the Truth of Human Being. Philosophy East and West 37 (1):51-70.score: 232.0
  43. Peter Cave (2007/2008). Can a Robot Be Human? 33 Perplexing Philosophy Puzzles. Oneworld.score: 229.0
  44. István Király Váradi (2011). A Betegség--Az Élő Létlehetősége: Prolegoména Az Emberi Betegség Filozófiájához: Részletes Angol Nyelvű Összefoglalóval = Illness--A Possibility of the Living Being: Prolegomena to the Philosophy of Human Illness: A Detailed English Summary. Kalligram.score: 229.0
     
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  45. Nirmala Kumāra (1995). Philosophy of Being Human. Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.score: 229.0
     
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  46. Xavier O. Monasterio (1985/1993). To Be Human: An Introductory Experiment in Philosophy. University Press of America.score: 229.0
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  47. Leon Pompa (1990). Human Nature and Historical Knowledge: Hume, Hegel, and Vico. Cambridge University Press.score: 228.0
    This book presents a study of the nature and conditions of historical knowledge, conducted through a study of the relevant theories of Hume, Hegel and Vico. It is usually thought that in order to establish historical facts, we have to have a theory of human nature to support our arguments. Hume, Hegel and Vico all subscribed to this view, and are therefore discussed in detail. Professor Pompa goes on to argue that there is in fact no way of discovering (...)
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  48. Thomas Engel & Ulrike Henckel (2008). Human Beings, Technology and the Idea of Man. Poiesis and Praxis 5 (3-4):249-263.score: 228.0
    Since ancient times philosophy has dealt with the relation between technology and man. Nowadays this is especially true in the context of the philosophy of technology. Technology is interpreted as an anthropological constant to construct an environment in which man can survive. Acting in the field of technology is to act rationally with a purpose, i.e., in the framework of a means-end relation, and it is employed for coping with experiences (Widerfahrnisse) by means of using tools. Like technology, (...)
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  49. Guanlian Qian (2005). Yu Yan: Ren Lei Zui Hou de Jia Yuan: Ren Lei Ji Ben Sheng Cun Zhuang Tai de Zhe Xue Yu Yu Yong Xue Yan Jiu = Language: The Last Homestead of Human Beings: Philosophical & Pragmatic Probe Into the Basic Survival Ways of Man. Shang Wu Yin Shu Guan.score: 228.0
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  50. Jay F. Rosenberg (1994). Beyond Formalism: Naming and Necessity for Human Beings. Temple University Press.score: 228.0
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