Search results for 'Human beings Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jaroslav Pecen (ed.) (1988). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Beings: Papers by Czechoslovak Aut[H]Ors of the Main Theme of the Xviii. World Congres[S] of Philosophy. Academia - Publishing House of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences.
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  2.  7
    Li Shuyou (1988). On Characteristics of Human Beings in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):221-253.
  3. Alasdair Macintyre (1994). Persons and Human Beings: The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy, Edited by Christopher Gill. [REVIEW] Arion 1 (3).
     
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  4. Michel Dion (2000). Existential Philosophy in an Ecological Perspective. An Alternative View of Non-Human Beings. Dialogue and Universalism 10:125.
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  5. V. Lazutka (ed.) (1988). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Beings: Towards the Xviiith World Congress of Philosophy, Brighton, United Kingdom, August 21-27, 1988. [REVIEW] Lithuanian Section of the Philosophical Society of the U.S.S.R..
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  6.  74
    Christopher Cordner (2005). Life and Death Matters: Losing a Sense of the Value of Human Beings. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):207-226.
    The essay combines a specific and a more general theme. In attacking ‘the doctrine of the sanctity of human life’ Singer takes himself thereby to be opposing the conviction that human life has special value. I argue that this conviction goes deep in our lives in many ways that do not depend on what Singer identifies as central to that ‘doctrine’, and that his attack therefore misses its main target. I argue more generally that Singer’s own moral (...) affords only an impoverished and distorted sense of the value of human life and human beings. In purporting to dig below the supposedly illusion–ridden surface of our thinking about value, Singer in fact often leads us away from the robust terrain of our lived experience into rhetorical, and sometimes brutal, fantasy. (shrink)
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  7. Ross Fitzgerald (ed.) (1978). What It Means to Be Human: Essays in Philosophical Anthropology, Political Philosophy, and Social Psychology. Pergamon Press Australia.
  8.  45
    Weixiang Ding (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13-37.
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, “ ming 命 (destiny or decrees)” and “ tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)” mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from “ ling 令 (decrees),” which evolved from “ wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)” into “ tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees),” and then became “ ming ” from a throne because of the decisive role of “heavenly decrees” over a throne. “ Ming ” and (...)
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  9.  10
    Ding Weixiang & Huang Deyuan (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13 - 37.
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, "ming 命 (destiny or decrees)" and "tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)" mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from "ling 令 (decrees)," which evolved from "wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)" into "tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees)," and then became "ming" from a throne because of the decisive role of "heavenly decrees" over a throne. "Ming" and "tian ming" have different definitions: "Ming" represented the limits (...)
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  10. Bruce Silver (2014). Dante's Paradiso: No Human Beings Allowed. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):110-127.
    “But when you meet her again,” he observed, “in Heaven, you, too, will be changed. You will see her spiritualized, with spiritual eyes.”1Dante is not a philosopher, although George Santayana sees him as one among a very few philosophical poets.2 The Divine Comedy deals in terza rima with issues that are philosophically urgent, including the relation between reasoning well and happiness.3And as one of the few great epics in Western literature, the Comedy offers its readers the pleasures of world-class poetry, (...)
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  11.  5
    E. H. Gombrich (1987). "They Were All Human Beings: So Much Is Plain": Reflections on Cultural Relativism in the Humanities. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):686-699.
    In the fourth section of Goethe’s Zahme Xenien we find the quatrain from which I have taken the theme of such an old and new controversy, which, as I hope, concerns both Germanic studies and the other humanities: “What was it that kept you from us so apart?” I always read Plutarch again and again. “And what was the lesson he did impart?” “They were all human beings—so much is plain.”1 In the very years when Goethe wrote these (...)
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  12.  8
    Hunter Brown & Dennis L. Hudecki (1997). Images of the Human: The Philosophy of the Human Person in a Religious Context. International Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2).
    Images of the human is the collective effort of thirteen philosophy professors to address the questions human beings have been asking for centuries. The book presents selections from the major works of eighteen of the best-known philosophers from ancient to modern times. Each chapter focuses on the writings of a different philosopher - from Plato to Nietzsche, Augustine to Sartre - and includes an introduction and critical comentary.
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  13. Leonard A. Kennedy (1995). Images of the Human the Philosophy of the Human Person in a Religious Context.
     
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  14.  16
    Holger Zaborowski (2009). Robert Spaemann's Philosophy of the Human Person: Nature, Freedom, and the Critique of Modernity. Oxford University Press.
    The German philosopher Robert Spaemann provides an important contribution to a number of contemporary debates in philosophy and theology, opening up possibilities for conversation between these disciplines. He engages in a dialogue with classical and contemporary positions and often formulates important and original insights which lie beyond common alternatives. In this study Holger Zaborowski provides an analysis of the most important features of Spaemann's philosophy and shows the unity of his thought. The question 'Who is a person?' is (...)
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  15.  24
    Robert B. Louden (2000). Kant's Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first book-length study in any language to examine in detail and critically assess the second part of Kant's ethics- -an empirical, impure part, which determines how best to apply pure principles to the human situation. Drawing attention to Kant's under-explored impure ethics, this revealing investigation refutes the common and long-standing misperception that Kants ethics advocates empty formalism. Making detailed use of a variety of Kantian texts never before translated into English, author Robert B. Louden reassesses the (...)
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  16. P. M. S. Hacker (2009). Philosophy: A Contribution, Not to Human Knowledge, but to Human Understanding. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):129-.
    P. M. S. Hacker 1. The poverty of philosophy as a science Throughout its history philosophy has been thought to be a member of a community of intellectual disciplines united by their common pursuit of knowledge. It has sometimes been thought to be the queen of the sciences, at other times merely their under-labourer. But irrespective of its social status, it was held to be a participant in the quest for knowledge – a cognitive discipline. Cognitive disciplines may (...)
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  17.  7
    Koichiro Misawa (2014). Animality and Rationality in Human Beings: Towards Enriching Contemporary Educational Studies. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (2):182-196.
    “What is the nature of the beings that we are?” is perhaps the most difficult question. The difficulty lies in our being a natural animal in a normative environment. In harmony with John McDowell’s conception of a naturalism of second nature, this paper claims that we should not rest satisfied with the predominant scientific picture in which the seeming rift between our animality and our rationality is to be resolved by detailed studies of empirically knowable facts about our animal (...)
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  18. Erica Fudge, Ruth Gilbert & Susan Wiseman (eds.) (1999). At the Borders of the Human: Beasts, Bodies, and Natural Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Palgrave.
    What is, what was the human? This book argues that the making of the human as it is now understood implies a renogotiation of the relationship between the self and the world. The development of Renaissance technologies of difference such as mapping, colonialism and anatomy paradoxically also illuminated the similarities between human and non-human. This collection considers the borders between humans and their imagined others: animals, women, native subjects, machines. It examines border creatures (hermaphrodites, wildmen, and (...)
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  19. Alexandre Lefebvre (2013). Human Rights as a Way of Life: On Bergson's Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
    The work of Henri Bergson, the foremost French philosopher of the early twentieth century, is not usually explored for its political dimensions. Indeed, Bergson is best known for his writings on time, evolution, and creativity. This book concentrates instead on his political philosophy—and especially on his late masterpiece, _The Two Sources of Morality and Religion_—from which Alexandre Lefebvre develops an original approach to human rights. We tend to think of human rights as the urgent international project of (...)
     
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  20.  16
    Paolo Palmieri (2009). Radical Mathematical Thomism: Beings of Reason and Divine Decrees in Torricelli's Philosophy of Mathematics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):131-142.
    Evangelista Torricelli is perhaps best known for being the most gifted of Galileo’s pupils, and for his works based on indivisibles, especially his stunning cubature of an infinite hyperboloid. Scattered among Torricelli’s writings, we find numerous traces of the philosophy of mathematics underlying his mathematical practice. Though virtually neglected by historians and philosophers alike, these traces reveal that Torricelli’s mathematical practice was informed by an original philosophy of mathematics. The latter was dashed with strains of Thomistic metaphysics and (...)
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  21.  22
    Stein M. Wivestad (2013). On Becoming Better Human Beings: Six Stories to Live By. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):55-71.
    What are the conditions required for becoming better human beings? What are our limitations and possibilities? I understand “becoming better” as a combined improvement process bringing persons “up from” a negative condition and “up to” a positive one. Today there is a tendency to understand improvement in a one-sided way as a movement up to the mastery of cognitive skills, neglecting the negative conditions that can make these skills mis-educative. I therefore tell six stories in the Western tradition (...)
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  22.  14
    Mendel F. Cohen (1990). Obligation and Human Nature in Hume's Philosophy. Philosophical Quarterly 40 (160):316-341.
    It is commonly held that moral judgements are implicitly general — or universalizable — in that if anyone is morally obligated to perform or refrain from some action, everyone in relevantly similar circumstances is similarly obligated. I undertake here to show that David Hume fully subscribed to this thesis and that because of the way it is related to his conceptions of obligation and what he terms the practicality of morals he is pushed to insist that the moral sentiments of (...)
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  23. Christopher Belshaw (2014). Environmental Philosophy: Reason, Nature and Human Concern. Routledge.
    This introduction to the philosophy of the environment examines current debates on how we should think about the natural world and our place within it. The subject is examined from a determinedly analytic philosophical perspective, focusing on questions of value, but taking in attendant issues in epistemology and metaphysics as well. The book begins by considering the nature, extent and origin of the environmental problems with which we need to be concerned. Chapters go on to consider familiar strategies for (...)
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  24.  29
    Niklas Luhmann (1989). Ecological Communication. Polity Press.
    Niklas Luhmann is widely recognized as one of the most original thinkers in the social sciences today. This major new work further develops the theories of the author by offering a challenging analysis of the relationship between society and the environment. Luhmann extends the concept of "ecology" to refer to any analysis that looks at connections between social systems and the surrounding environment. He traces the development of the notion of "environment" from the medieval idea--which encompasses both human and (...)
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  25.  27
    John Dupré (2001). Human Nature and the Limits of Science. Oxford University Press.
    John Dupre warns that our understanding of human nature is being distorted by two faulty and harmful forms of pseudo-scientific thinking. Not just in the academic world but in everyday life, we find one set of experts who seek to explain the ends at which humans aim in terms of evolutionary theory, while the other set uses economic models to give rules of how we act to achieve those ends. Dupre demonstrates that these theorists' explanations do not work and (...)
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  26.  35
    Eric T. Olson (2015). On Parfit's View That We Are Not Human Beings. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 76:39-56.
    Derek Parfit claims that we are not human beings. Rather, each of us is the part of a human being that thinks in the strictest sense. This is said to solve a number of difficult metaphysical problems. I argue that the view has metaphysical problems of its own, and is inconsistent with any psychological-continuity account of personal identity over time, including Parfit's own.
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  27.  15
    Andrew McGee (2016). We Are Human Beings. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (2):148-171.
    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan’s arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has (...)
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  28.  90
    Christopher Gill (ed.) (1990). The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This collection of essays explores analogous issues in classical and modern philosophy that relate to the concepts of person and human being. A primary focus is whether there are such analogous issues, and whether we can find in ancient philosophy a notion that is comparable to "person" as understood in modern philosophy. Essays on modern philosophy reappraise the validity of the notion of person, while essays on classical philosophy take up the related questions of (...)
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  29.  49
    Christopher Lang, Elliott Sober & Karen Strier (2002). Are Human Beings Part of the Rest of Nature? Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):661-671.
    Unified explanations seek to situate the traits of human beings in a causal framework that also explains the trait values found in nonhuman species. Disunified explanations claim that the traits of human beings are due to causal processes not at work in the rest of nature. This paper outlines a methodology for testing hypotheses of these two types. Implications are drawn concerning evolutionary psychology, adaptationism, and anti-adaptationism.
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  30.  45
    Peter Baumann (2007). Persons, Human Beings, and Respect. Polish Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):5-17.
    Human dignity seems very important to us. At the same time, the concept ‘human dignity’ is extrordinarily elusive. A good way to approach the questions “What is it?” and “Why is it important?” is to raise another question first: In virtue of what do human beings have dignity? Speciesism - the idea that human beings have a particular dignity because they are humans - does not seem very convincing. A better answer says that (...) beings have dignity because and insofar as they are persons. I discuss several versions of this idea as well as several objections against it. The most promising line of analysis says that human beings cannot survive psychologically without a very basic form of recognition and respect by others. The idea that humans have a very special dignity is the idea that they owe each other this kind of respect. All this also suggests that human dignity is inherently social. Non-social beings do not have dignity - nor do they lack it. It is because we are social animals of a certain kind that we have dignity - not so much because we are rational animals. (shrink)
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  31.  30
    David Cockburn (1994). Human Beings and Giant Squids (on Ascribing Human Sensations and Emotions to Non-Human Creatures). Philosophy 69 (268):135-50.
    A television nature programme a year or two ago contained a striking sequence in which a giant squid was under threat from some other creature . The squid responded in a way which struck me immediately and powerfully as one of fear. Part of what was striking in this sequence was the way in which it was possible to see in the behaviour of a creature physically so very different from human beings an emotion which was so unambiguously (...)
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  32.  9
    E. Cioflec (2012). On Hannah Arendt: The Worldly In-Between of Human Beings and its Ethical Consequences. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):646-663.
    In this paper, I show how a concept of ethics can be derived from Hannah Arendt’s theory of action in The Human Condition , which contains from her call for action. When she looks at the ‘political actor’, as well as at the concept of ‘political situation’, her ethical claim is first of all the need to take initiative, to act. Hence, ‘political situations’ as she defines them are discussed as common responsibilities. But common responsibility is rooted in the (...)
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  33.  27
    Alexander Barzel (1998). The Perplexing Conclusion: The Essential Difference Between Natural and Artificial Intelligence is Human Beings' Ability to Deceive. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):165–178.
    As opposed to the computer, the human being can intentionally mislead in many different ways, can behave chaotically, and whenever he has the motivation can choose also by improvisation, non‐consequent misleading, and spontaneous manners of reasoning and articulation. Human perception and the elaboration of the experience are existentially interest‐related, and distorted if found necessary. The arbitrariness is unlimited; human beings can initiate and produce absurd combinations, contextual failures and deceptive expressions, and do so also by intonation (...)
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  34.  16
    Giovanni Felice Azzone (2003). The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic (...)
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  35.  23
    Joseph Cropsey (1995). Plato's World: Man's Place in the Cosmos. University of Chicago Press.
    In this culmination of a lifetime's study, Joseph Cropsey examines the crucial relationship between Plato's conception of the nature of the universe and his moral and political thought. Cropsey interprets seven of Plato's dialogues-- Theaetetus , Euthyphro , Sophist , Statesman , Apology , Crito , and Phaedo --in light of their dramatic consecutiveness and thus as a conceptual and dramatic whole. The cosmos depicted by Plato in these dialogues, Cropsey argues, is often unreasonable, and populated by human (...) unaided by gods and dealt with equivocally by nature. Masterfully leading the reader through the seven scenes of the drama, Cropsey shows how they are, to an astonishing degree, concerned with the resources available to help us survive in such a world. This is a world--and a Plato--quite at odds with most other portraits. Much more than a summary of Plato's thinking, this book is an eloquent, sometimes amusing, often moving guide to the paradoxes and insights of Plato's philosophy. (shrink)
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  36. Veronica Gventsadze (2001). Human Freedom in the Philosophy of Pierre Gassendi. Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    This dissertation is the first comprehensive study of human freedom in the philosophy of Pierre Gassendi, a 17th century natural scientist, Catholic priest, and one of the founders of Early Modern philosophy. The key postulate of this dissertation is that the epistemology of probabilism, which represents Gassendi's skeptical stance toward the possibility of certain knowledge, is also the foundation of human freedom: the uncertain and merely probable nature of all our knowledge serves as a guarantee of (...)
     
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  37.  5
    M. Vlerick (2012). How Can Human Beings Transgress Their Biologically Based Views? South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):707-735.
    Empirical evidence from developmental psychology and anthropology points out that the human mind is predisposed to conceptualize the world in particular, species-specific ways. These cognitive predispositions lead to universal human commonsense views, often referred to as folk theories. Nevertheless, humans can transgress these views – i.e. they can contradict them with alternative descriptions, they perceive as more accurate – as exemplified in modern sciences. In this paper, I enquire about the cognitive faculties underlying such transgressions. I claim that (...)
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  38. Derek Parfit (2012). We Are Not Human Beings. Philosophy 87 (01):5-28.
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  39. Robert B. Louden (2000). Kant's Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This is the first book-length study in any language to examine in detail and critically assess the second part of Kant's ethics--an empirical, impure part, which determines how best to apply pure principles to the human situation. Drawing attention to Kant's under-explored impure ethics, this revealing investigation refutes the common and long-standing misperception that Kants ethics advocates empty formalism. Making detailed use of a variety of Kantian texts never before translated into English, author Robert B. Louden reassesses the strengths (...)
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  40. Robert B. Louden (2003). Kant's Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This is the first book-length study in any language to examine in detail and critically assess the second part of Kant's ethics--an empirical, impure part, which determines how best to apply pure principles to the human situation. Drawing attention to Kant's under-explored impure ethics, this revealing investigation refutes the common and long-standing misperception that Kants ethics advocates empty formalism. Making detailed use of a variety of Kantian texts never before translated into English, author Robert B. Louden reassesses the strengths (...)
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  41. David Cockburn (2015). Human Beings. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the importance of the notion 'human being'? The contributors to this collection have radically different approaches, some accepting and others denying its validity for a proper understanding of what a person is and for our ethical thought about each other. Contributors on both sides of the divide eloquently defend their views in ways that stand in sharp contrast to some current work in moral philosophy and philosophy of mind. Epistemological and theological issues are also raised (...)
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  42.  47
    Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's our fault -- (...)
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  43. David S. Oderberg (1989). Johnston on Human Beings. Journal of Philosophy 86 (March):137-41.
  44.  17
    David Cockburn (ed.) (1991). Human Beings. Cambridge University Press.
    The contributors to this collection have radically different approaches, some accepting and others denying its validity for a proper understanding of what a...
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  45. John D. Barrow (1986). The Anthropic Cosmological Principle. Oxford University Press.
    Ever since Copernicus, scientists have continually adjusted their view of human nature, moving it further and further from its ancient position at the center of Creation. But in recent years, a startling new concept has evolved that places it more firmly than ever in a special position. Known as the Anthropic Cosmological Principle, this collection of ideas holds that the existence of intelligent observers determines the fundamental structure of the Universe. In its most radical version, the Anthropic Principle asserts (...)
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  46.  5
    Richard J. Bernstein (1999). Praxis and Action Contemporary Philosophies of Human Activity. University of Pennsylvania Press.
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  47.  48
    David Bakhurst (1995). Social Being and the Human Essence: An Unresolved Issue in Soviet Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 47 (1-2):3-60.
    This is a transcription of a debate on the concept of a person conducted in Moscow in 1983. David Bakhurst argues that Evald Ilyenkov's social constructivist conception of personhood, founded on Marx's thesis that the human essence is the ensemble of social relations, is either false or trivially true. F. T. Mikhailov, V. S. Bibler, V. A. Lektorsky and V. V. Davydov critically assess Bakhurst's arguments, elucidate and contextualize Ilyenkov's views, and defend, in contrasting ways, the claim that (...) individuals are socially constituted beings. Issues discussed include: the concepts of activity (dejatel'nost') and community (obenija) and their relevance to the notions of mind and personhood; self-consciousness and its relation to personal identity; naturalism in Soviet thought. Translated from the Russian. (shrink)
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  48.  5
    Gerald L. Bruns (2011). On Ceasing to Be Human. Stanford University Press.
    Prologue : on the freedom of non-identity -- Otherwise than human (toward sovereignty) -- What is human recognition? (on zones of indistinction) -- Desubjectivation (Michel Foucault's aesthetics of experience) -- Becoming animal (some simple ways) -- Derrida's cat (who am I?).
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  49.  17
    Howard L. Parsons (1975). Man East and West: Essays in East-West Philosophy. Grüner.
    Chapter I MAN IN EAST AND WEST: HIS DIVISION AND HIS UNITY The problems of man in our world in our times are often conceived in terms of the separation ...
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  50.  9
    S. Radhakrishnan (1966). The Concept of Man: A Study in Comparative Philosophy. London, Allen & Unwin.
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