Search results for 'Human beings Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jaroslav Pecen (ed.) (1988). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Beings: Papers by Czechoslovak Aut[H]Ors of the Main Theme of the Xviii. World Congres[S] of Philosophy. Academia - Publishing House of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences.score: 147.0
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  2. Ross Fitzgerald (ed.) (1978). What It Means to Be Human: Essays in Philosophical Anthropology, Political Philosophy, and Social Psychology. Pergamon Press Australia.score: 109.0
  3. Christopher Cordner (2005). Life and Death Matters: Losing a Sense of the Value of Human Beings. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):207-226.score: 99.0
    The essay combines a specific and a more general theme. In attacking ‘the doctrine of the sanctity of human life’ Singer takes himself thereby to be opposing the conviction that human life has special value. I argue that this conviction goes deep in our lives in many ways that do not depend on what Singer identifies as central to that ‘doctrine’, and that his attack therefore misses its main target. I argue more generally that Singer’s own moral (...) affords only an impoverished and distorted sense of the value of human life and human beings. In purporting to dig below the supposedly illusion–ridden surface of our thinking about value, Singer in fact often leads us away from the robust terrain of our lived experience into rhetorical, and sometimes brutal, fantasy. (shrink)
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  4. Li Shuyou (1988). On Characteristics of Human Beings in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):221-253.score: 90.0
  5. Adam Etinson (2010). To Be or Not to Be: Charles Beitz on the Philosophy of Human Rights. Res Publica 16 (4):441-448.score: 87.0
    This is a review article of Charles Beitz's 2009 book on the philosophy of human rights, The Idea of Human Rights. The article provides a charitable overview of the book's main arguments, but also raises some doubts about the depth of the distinction between Beitz's 'practical' approach to humans rights and its 'naturalistic' counterparts.
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  6. Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.score: 87.0
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's our fault -- (...)
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  7. Weixiang Ding (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13-37.score: 87.0
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, “ ming 命 (destiny or decrees)” and “ tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)” mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from “ ling 令 (decrees),” which evolved from “ wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)” into “ tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees),” and then became “ ming ” from a throne because of the decisive role of “heavenly decrees” over a throne. “ Ming ” and (...)
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  8. Joseph Cropsey (1995). Plato's World: Man's Place in the Cosmos. University of Chicago Press.score: 87.0
    In this culmination of a lifetime's study, Joseph Cropsey examines the crucial relationship between Plato's conception of the nature of the universe and his moral and political thought. Cropsey interprets seven of Plato's dialogues-- Theaetetus , Euthyphro , Sophist , Statesman , Apology , Crito , and Phaedo --in light of their dramatic consecutiveness and thus as a conceptual and dramatic whole. The cosmos depicted by Plato in these dialogues, Cropsey argues, is often unreasonable, and populated by human (...) unaided by gods and dealt with equivocally by nature. Masterfully leading the reader through the seven scenes of the drama, Cropsey shows how they are, to an astonishing degree, concerned with the resources available to help us survive in such a world. This is a world--and a Plato--quite at odds with most other portraits. Much more than a summary of Plato's thinking, this book is an eloquent, sometimes amusing, often moving guide to the paradoxes and insights of Plato's philosophy. (shrink)
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  9. Niklas Luhmann (1989). Ecological Communication. Polity Press.score: 87.0
    Niklas Luhmann is widely recognized as one of the most original thinkers in the social sciences today. This major new work further develops the theories of the author by offering a challenging analysis of the relationship between society and the environment. Luhmann extends the concept of "ecology" to refer to any analysis that looks at connections between social systems and the surrounding environment. He traces the development of the notion of "environment" from the medieval idea--which encompasses both human and (...)
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  10. Ding Weixiang & Huang Deyuan (2009). Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13 - 37.score: 87.0
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, "ming 命 (destiny or decrees)" and "tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)" mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from "ling 令 (decrees)," which evolved from "wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)" into "tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees)," and then became "ming" from a throne because of the decisive role of "heavenly decrees" over a throne. "Ming" and "tian ming" have different definitions: "Ming" represented the limits (...)
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  11. Michel Dion (2000). Existential Philosophy in an Ecological Perspective. An Alternative View of Non-Human Beings. Dialogue and Universalism 10:125.score: 87.0
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  12. V. Lazutka (ed.) (1988). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Beings: Towards the Xviiith World Congress of Philosophy, Brighton, United Kingdom, August 21-27, 1988. [REVIEW] Lithuanian Section of the Philosophical Society of the U.S.S.R..score: 87.0
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  13. Armin Grunwald & Yannick Julliard (2007). Nanotechnology – Steps Towards Understanding Human Beings as Technology? NanoEthics 1 (2):77-87.score: 84.0
    Far-reaching promises made by nanotechnology have raised the question of whether we are on the way to understanding human beings more and more as belonging to the realm of technology. In this paper, an increasing need to understand the technological re-conceptualization of human beings is diagnosed whenever increasingly “technical” interpretations of humans as mechanical entities are disseminated. And this can be observed at present in the framework of nanobiotechnology, a foremost “technical” self-description where a technical language (...)
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  14. Gerald L. Bruns (2011). On Ceasing to Be Human. Stanford University Press.score: 81.0
    Prologue : on the freedom of non-identity -- Otherwise than human (toward sovereignty) -- What is human recognition? (on zones of indistinction) -- Desubjectivation (Michel Foucault's aesthetics of experience) -- Becoming animal (some simple ways) -- Derrida's cat (who am I?).
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  15. Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (1995). Making Sense of Humanity and Other Philosophical Papers, 1982-1993. Cambridge University Press.score: 80.0
    This new volume of philosophical papers by Bernard Williams is divided into three sections: the first Action, Freedom, Responsibility, the second Philosophy, Evolution and the Human Sciences; in which appears the essay which gives the collection its title; and the third Ethics, which contains essays closely related to his 1983 book Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. Like the two earlier volumes of Williams's papers published by Cambridge University Press, Problems of the Self and Moral Luck, this (...)
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  16. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 77.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
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  17. E. J. Applewhite (1991). Paradise Mislaid: Birth, Death & the Human Predicament of Being Biological. St. Martin's Press.score: 76.0
     
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  18. Lloyd J. Averill (1974). The Problem of Being Human. Valley Forge [Pa.]Judson Press.score: 76.0
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  19. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1974/2006). The Gay Science. New York,Vintage Books.score: 75.7
    Nietzsche called The Gay Science "the most personal of all my books." It was here that he first proclaimed the death of God -- to which a large part of the book is devoted -- and his doctrine of the eternal recurrence. Walter Kaufmann's commentary, with its many quotations from previously untranslated letters, brings to life Nietzsche as a human being and illuminates his philosophy. The book contains some of Nietzsche's most sustained discussions of art and morality, knowledge (...)
     
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  20. David Bakhurst (1995). Social Being and the Human Essence: An Unresolved Issue in Soviet Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 47 (1-2):3-60.score: 75.0
    This is a transcription of a debate on the concept of a person conducted in Moscow in 1983. David Bakhurst argues that Evald Ilyenkov's social constructivist conception of personhood, founded on Marx's thesis that the human essence is the ensemble of social relations, is either false or trivially true. F. T. Mikhailov, V. S. Bibler, V. A. Lektorsky and V. V. Davydov critically assess Bakhurst's arguments, elucidate and contextualize Ilyenkov's views, and defend, in contrasting ways, the claim that (...) individuals are socially constituted beings. Issues discussed include: the concepts of activity (dejatel'nost') and community (obenija) and their relevance to the notions of mind and personhood; self-consciousness and its relation to personal identity; naturalism in Soviet thought. Translated from the Russian. (shrink)
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  21. John Dupré (2001). Human Nature and the Limits of Science. Oxford University Press.score: 75.0
    John Dupre warns that our understanding of human nature is being distorted by two faulty and harmful forms of pseudo-scientific thinking. Not just in the academic world but in everyday life, we find one set of experts who seek to explain the ends at which humans aim in terms of evolutionary theory, while the other set uses economic models to give rules of how we act to achieve those ends. Dupre demonstrates that these theorists' explanations do not work and (...)
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  22. R. F. Ellen & Katsuyoshi Fukui (eds.) (1996). Redefining Nature: Ecology, Culture, and Domestication. Berg.score: 75.0
    - How can anthropology improve our understanding of the interrelationship between nature and culture? - What can anthropology contribute to practical debates which depend on particular definitions of nature, such as that concerning sustainable development? Humankind has evolved over several million years by living in and utilizing 'nature' and by assimilating it into 'culture'. Indeed, the technological and cultural advancement of the species has been widely acknowledged to rest upon human domination and control of nature. Yet, by the 1960s, (...)
     
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  23. Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 74.0
    In Moral Animals, Catherine Wilson develops a theory of morality based on two fundamental premises: first that moral progress implies the evolution of moral ideals involving restraint and sacrifice; second that human beings are outfitted by nature with selfish motivations, intentions, and ambitions that place constraints on what morality can demand of them. Normative claims, she goes on to show, can be understood as projective hypotheses concerning the conduct of realistically-described nonideal agents in preferred fictional worlds. Such claims (...)
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  24. Steve Fuller (2012). The Art of Being Human: A Project for General Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):113-123.score: 73.0
    Throughout the medieval and modern periods, in various sacred and secular guises, the unification of all forms of knowledge under the rubric of ‘science’ has been taken as the prerogative of humanity as a species. However, as our sense of species privilege has been called increasingly into question, so too has the very salience of ‘humanity’ and ‘science’ as general categories, let alone ones that might bear some essential relationship to each other. After showing how the ascendant Stanford School in (...)
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  25. Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.score: 73.0
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance the quality (...)
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  26. James S. Trefil (2004). Human Nature: A Blueprint for Managing the Earth--By People, for People. Times Books/Henry Holt.score: 73.0
    A radical approach to the environment which argues that by harnessing the power of science for human benefit, we can have a healthier planet As a prizewinning theoretical physicist and an outspoken advocate for scientific literacy, James Trefil has long been the public's guide to a better understanding of the world. In this provocative book, Trefil looks squarely at our environmental future and finds-contrary to popular wisdom-reason to celebrate. For too long, Trefil argues, humans have treated nature as something (...)
     
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  27. Holger Zaborowski (2010). Robert Spaemann's Philosophy of the Human Person: Nature, Freedom, and the Critique of Modernity. Oxford University Press.score: 71.0
    The German philosopher Robert Spaemann provides an important contribution to a number of contemporary debates in philosophy and theology, opening up possibilities for conversation between these disciplines. He engages in a dialogue with classical and contemporary positions and often formulates important and original insights which lie beyond common alternatives. In this study Holger Zaborowski provides an analysis of the most important features of Spaemann's philosophy and shows the unity of his thought. The question 'Who is a person?' is (...)
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  28. Hunter Brown & Dennis L. Hudecki (1997). Images of the Human: The Philosophy of the Human Person in a Religious Context. International Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2).score: 71.0
    Images of the human is the collective effort of thirteen philosophy professors to address the questions human beings have been asking for centuries. The book presents selections from the major works of eighteen of the best-known philosophers from ancient to modern times. Each chapter focuses on the writings of a different philosopher - from Plato to Nietzsche, Augustine to Sartre - and includes an introduction and critical comentary.
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  29. Leon Pompa (1990). Human Nature and Historical Knowledge: Hume, Hegel, and Vico. Cambridge University Press.score: 70.0
    This book presents a study of the nature and conditions of historical knowledge, conducted through a study of the relevant theories of Hume, Hegel and Vico. It is usually thought that in order to establish historical facts, we have to have a theory of human nature to support our arguments. Hume, Hegel and Vico all subscribed to this view, and are therefore discussed in detail. Professor Pompa goes on to argue that there is in fact no way of discovering (...)
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  30. Lewis A. Froman (1973). The Manuscript of Hugo Potts. Carbondale,Southern Illinois University Press.score: 70.0
    In this unique and mind-expanding book, addressed to general readers as well as students of philosophy, Creel Froman establishes a fascinatingly new way of looking at human behavior. His principal themes are: What does life mean? How do we arrive at answers to such a ques­tion? What is the answer? In a skillful blending of fiction and scholarship, using dialogue, prose, and poetry, he makes his points regarding the human condition.
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  31. Wilbur R. Hubbard (1951). Secondary Reinforcement of a Simple Discrimination in Human Beings. Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (4):233.score: 70.0
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  32. Edward K. Kaplan (1977). Michelet's Poetic Vision: A Romantic Philosophy of Nature, Man, & Woman. University of Massachusetts Press.score: 69.0
    Jules Michelet Historian, Philosopher, Naturalist A vast, all-embracing literary personality dominates Michelet's works: that of the author. ...
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  33. Howard L. Parsons (1975). Man East and West: Essays in East-West Philosophy. Grüner.score: 69.0
    Chapter I MAN IN EAST AND WEST: HIS DIVISION AND HIS UNITY The problems of man in our world in our times are often conceived in terms of the separation ...
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  34. A. W. H. Adkins (1970). From the Many to the One: A Study of Personality and Views of Human Nature in the Context of Ancient Greek Society, Values and Beliefs. London,Constable.score: 69.0
  35. K. Damodaran (1970). Man and Society in Indian Philosophy. New Delhi,People's Pub. House.score: 69.0
     
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  36. Robert J. Kreyche (1972). The Betrayal of Wisdom & the Challenge to Philosophy Today. Staten Island, N.Y.,Alba House.score: 69.0
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  37. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (2013). Human, All Too Human Ii and Unpublished Fragments From the Period of Human, All Too Human Ii (Spring 1878-Fall 1879). Stanford University Press.score: 69.0
     
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  38. S. Radhakrishnan (1966). The Concept of Man: A Study in Comparative Philosophy. London, Allen & Unwin.score: 69.0
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  39. Erica Fudge (1999/2002). Perceiving Animals: Humans and Beasts in Early Modern English Culture. University of Illinois Press.score: 67.0
    When the human understanding of beasts in the past is studied, what are revealed is not only the foundations of our own perception of animals, but humans contemplating their own status. This book argues that what is revealed in a wide range of writing from the early modern period is a recurring attempt to separate the human from the beast. Looking at the representation of the animal in the law, religious writings, literary representation, science and political ideas, what (...)
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  40. Dominick LaCapra (2009). History and its Limits: Human, Animal, Violence. Cornell University Press.score: 67.0
    Introduction For Freud, beyond the explanatory limits of the pleasure principle lay the repetition compulsion, the death drive, and trauma with its ...
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  41. Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.score: 67.0
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  42. Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 67.0
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
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  43. George Appleton (ed.) (1979). The Human Search: With Teilhard De Chardin. Fount Paperbacks.score: 67.0
     
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  44. Lewis White Beck (1974/1998). The Actor and the Spectator: Foundations of the Theory of Human Action. Thoemmes Press.score: 67.0
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  45. Myles Brand (1970). The Nature of Human Action. [Glenview, Ill.]Scott, Foresman.score: 67.0
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  46. Erica Fudge, Ruth Gilbert & Susan Wiseman (eds.) (1999). At the Borders of the Human: Beasts, Bodies, and Natural Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Palgrave.score: 67.0
    What is, what was the human? This book argues that the making of the human as it is now understood implies a renogotiation of the relationship between the self and the world. The development of Renaissance technologies of difference such as mapping, colonialism and anatomy paradoxically also illuminated the similarities between human and non-human. This collection considers the borders between humans and their imagined others: animals, women, native subjects, machines. It examines border creatures (hermaphrodites, wildmen, and (...)
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  47. Erich Jantsch (1980). The Self-Organizing Universe: Scientific and Human Implications of the Emerging Paradigm of Evolution. Pergamon Press.score: 67.0
     
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  48. Joseph Wood Krutch (1974). What Does "Human Nature" Mean? [New York,J. Norton Publishers.score: 67.0
     
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  49. Eleanor Kuykendall (1970). Philosophy in the Age of Crisis. New York,Harper & Row.score: 67.0
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  50. Glenn Langford (1971). Human Action. Garden City, N.Y.,Anchor Books.score: 67.0
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