Search results for 'Human cloning Law and legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Samuel Mejías Valbuena (2005). Philosophical, Scientist, Moral, Ethics and Religious Analysis in the Juridical Compared Science in the Law of Cloning. S. Mejías Valbuena.score: 136.5
     
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  2. Judit Sándor & Violeta Beširević (eds.) (2009). Perfect Copy?: Law and Ethics of Reproductive Medicine. Cenger for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine.score: 109.5
     
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  3. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 102.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects (...)
     
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  4. Ann-Kathrin Hirschmüller (2009). Internationales Verbot des Humanklonens: Die Verhandlungen in der Uno. P. Lang.score: 100.5
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  5. Eduardo de Oliveira Leite & Adriana Cristine Arent (eds.) (2004). Grandes Temas da Atualidade: Bioética E Biodireito. Editora Forense.score: 100.5
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  6. Gérard Teboul (ed.) (2004). Procréation Et Droits de L'Enfant: Actes des Rencontres Internationales Organisées les 16, 17 Et 18 Septembre 2003 à Marseille Par l'Observatoire International du Droit de la Bioéthique Et de la Médecine [Sic]. [REVIEW] Nemesis.score: 100.5
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  7. Naigen Zhang & Mireille Delmas-Marty (eds.) (2002). Ke Long Ren: Fa Lü Yu She Hui. Fu Dan da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 100.5
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  8. Roger Brownsword, W. R. Cornish & Margaret Llewelyn (eds.) (1998). Law and Human Genetics: Regulating a Revolution. Hart Pub..score: 93.0
    This special issue of the Modern Law Review addresses a range of key issues - conceptual, ethical, political and practical - arising from the regulatory ...
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  9. David W. Meyers (2006). The Human Body and the Law: A Medico-Legal Study. Aldine Transaction.score: 93.0
    Thus, Meyers provides a valuable account, not only of current medical attitudes, but also of relevant case and statute law as it stands at present.
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  10. Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.score: 93.0
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
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  11. David W. Meyers (1990). The Human Body and the Law. Stanford University Press.score: 90.0
    Mother and Fetus: Rights in Conflict A. INTRODUCTION After fertilization of the female egg (ovum) with male sperm the resulting zygote may implant ...
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  12. García San José & I. Daniel (2010). International Bio Law: An International Overview of Developments in Human Embryo Research and Experimentation. Ediciones Laborum.score: 90.0
     
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  13. D. E. Cutas (2008). Illegal Beings. Human Cloning and the Law. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):510-510.score: 85.5
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  14. Leon Kass (1998). The Ethics of Human Cloning. Aei Press.score: 81.0
    Wilson and Kass talked about their book, The ethics of human cloning, which is about the ethical debate over human cloning.
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  15. Robert McCorquodale (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility and International Human Rights Law. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):385 - 400.score: 78.0
    The United Nations Special Representative on Transnational Corporations and Human Rights, John Ruggie, has adopted a new framework for considering this issue within the international legal system. This article examines this framework in terms of its coherence, its consistency with international human rights law and how it can be 'operationalized' (which is required by the United Nations). In regard to the states legal obligation to protect human rights, it is considered whether this obligation is broader and deeper (...)
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  16. Laurentiu Staicu (2012). Human Cloning and the Myth of Disenchantment. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):148-169.score: 78.0
    This study has a twofold objective: firstly, it aims to examine the main types of argument that have been formulated against human cloning, to identify their presuppositions and to evaluate their strength; secondly, it aims to argue that the most important objections against human cloning are philosophical and religious, in particular the objection that human cloning represents a radical form of disenchantment or an abuse of rationality. The birth of a cloned mammal, a sheep (...)
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  17. Marie Thérèse Meulders-Klein, Ruth Deech & P. Vlaardingerbroek (eds.) (2002). Biomedicine, the Family, and Human Rights. Kluwer Law International.score: 75.0
    This volume examines the impact of advances in genetics and assisted reproduction technologies on family law, human rights and the rights of the child, ...
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  18. Elena Pariotti (2009). International Soft Law, Human Rights and Non-State Actors: Towards the Accountability of Transnational Corporations? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (2):139-155.score: 75.0
    During this age of globalisation, the law is characterised by an ever diminishing hierarchical framework, with an increasing role played by non-state actors. Such features are also pertinent for the international enforceability of human rights. With respect to human rights, TNCs seem to be given broadening obligations, which approach the borderline between ethics and law. The impact of soft law in this context is also relevant. This paper aims to assess whether, and to what extent, this trend could (...)
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  19. Miriam Gur-Arye (2012). Human Dignity of “Offenders”: A Limitation on Substantive Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):187-205.score: 75.0
    The paper argues for attaching a significant role to the dignity of offenders as a limitation on the scope of substantive criminal law. Three different aspects of human dignity are discussed. Human dignity is closely connected with the principle of culpability. Respecting the dignity of offenders requires that we assign criminal liability according to the actual attitudes of the offenders towards the interests protected by the offence. The doctrine of natural and probable consequence of complicity, which allows us (...)
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  20. Nestor Micheli Morales (2009). Psychological and Ideological Aspects of Human Cloning: A Transition to a Transhumanist Psychology. Journal of Evolution and Technology 20.score: 75.0
    The prospect of replication of human beings through genetic manipulation has engendered one of the most controversial debates about reproduction in our society. Ideology is clearly influencing the direction of research and legislation on human cloning, which may present one of the greatest existential challenges to the meaning of creation. In this article, I argue that, in view of the possibility that human cloning and other emerging technologies could enhance physical and cognitive abilities, there (...)
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  21. Thérèse Murphy (ed.) (2009). New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 75.0
    The first IVF baby was born in the 1970s. Less than 20 years later, we had cloning and GM food, and information and communication technologies had transformed everyday life. In 2000, the human genome was sequenced. More recently, there has been much discussion of the economic and social benefits of nanotechnology, and synthetic biology has also been generating controversy. This important volume is a timely contribution to increasing calls for regulation - or better regulation - of these and (...)
     
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  22. Timothy Caulfield (2003). Human Cloning Laws, Human Dignity and the Poverty of the Policy Making Dialogue. BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-7.score: 74.8
    Background The regulation of human cloning continues to be a significant national and international policy issue. Despite years of intense academic and public debate, there is little clarity as to the philosophical foundations for many of the emerging policy choices. The notion of "human dignity" is commonly used to justify cloning laws. The basis for this justification is that reproductive human cloning necessarily infringes notions of human dignity. Discussion The author critiques one of (...)
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  23. Bernard E. Rollin (1999). Keeping Up with the Cloneses -- Issues in Human Cloning. Journal of Ethics 3 (1):51-71.score: 73.5
    The advent of cloning animals has created a maelstrom of social concern about the ethical issues associated with the possibility of cloning humans. When the ethical concerns are clearly examined, however, many of them turn out to be less matters of rational ethics than knee-jerk emotion, religious bias, or fear of that which is not understood. Three categories of real and spurious ethical concerns are presented and discussed: 1) that cloning is intrinsically wrong, 2) that cloning (...)
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  24. Joyce C. Havstad (2010). Human Reproductive Cloning: A Conflict of Liberties. Bioethics 24 (2):71-77.score: 72.0
    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper (...)
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  25. Scott Veitch (2007). Law and Irresponsibility: On the Legitimation of Human Suffering. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 72.0
    It is commonly understood that in its focus on rights and obligations law is centrally concerned with organising responsibility. In defining how obligations are created, in contract or property law, say, or imposed, as in tort, public, or criminal law, law and legal institutions are usually seen as society’s key mode of asserting and defining the content and scope of responsibilities. This book takes the converse view: legal institutions are centrally involved in organising irresponsibility. Particularly with respect to the production (...)
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  26. Solveiga Cirtautienė (2013). Impact of Human Rights on Private Law in Lithuania and Other European Countries: Problematic Aspects. Jurisprudence 20 (1):77-90.score: 72.0
    The aim of this article is to investigate the problem how and to what extent human rights affect the relationships between private parties and what consequences this effect has for the development of private law in Lithuania and other European countries. Because Lithuanian legal doctrine lacks relevant research on this subject-matter, the author seeks to start and invoke the beginning of conceptual academic discourse on the matter. It is argued that despite the fact that in many countries the impact (...)
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  27. Marius Jonaitis & Albertas Milinis (2011). Human Life as Legal Value and its Protection in the Roman Law (article in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 18 (3):821-840.score: 72.0
    Right to life is an essential natural right protected and defended by law. The aim of this publication is to discuss the main issues regarding human right to life and its protection in the Roman law. Article deals with the problems of beginning and end of the human life and legal capacity in Rome, elements of legal protection of slaves and family members subject to pater familias life as well as the principle crimes attempting to human life. (...)
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  28. Martin Reufels & Karl Molle (2012). Labour Law Within the Recent Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1567-1583.score: 72.0
    The article deals with the impact of the recent jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on the German labour law practice. After a brief introduction of the general importance of the jurisprudence of the ECHR for the German labour law (I.), the authors illustrate the German and the ECHR’s jurisprudence on the duty of loyalty towards the ecclesiastic employer (II.) and whistle blowing (III.). Analysing this jurisprudence, the authors come to the conclusion that the ECHR approved (...)
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  29. Jesse Wall (2014). Human Rights Reasoning and Medical Law: A Sceptical Essay. Bioethics 28 (4).score: 72.0
    I am sceptical as to the contribution that human rights can make to our evaluation of medical law. I will argue here that viewing medical law through a human rights framework provides no greater clarity, insight or focus. If anything, human rights reasoning clouds any bioethical or evaluative analysis. In Section 1 of this article, I outline the general structure of human rights reasoning. I will describe human rights reasoning as (a) reasoning from rights that (...)
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  30. Antoinette Rouvroy (2008). Human Genes and Neoliberal Governance: A Foucauldian Critique. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 69.0
    The production of genetic knowledge -- Scientific and economic strength of genetic reductionism -- Policy implications : discourses of genetic enlightenment as new disciplinary devices -- Genetic conceptualizations of normality and the idea of genetic justice -- Beyond genetic universality and authenticity, the lure of the genetic underclass -- Previews of the future as background -- Economic and actuarial perspective on genetics and insurance -- Practical and normative arguments against genetic exceptionalist legislation -- The changing social role of private (...)
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  31. Viktoras Justickis & Vidmantas Egidijus Kurapka (2009). Criminogenic Security of Law in the EU and Lithuanian Legislation. Jurisprudence 117 (3):217-238.score: 69.0
    The study focuses on the phenomenon of crime-causing (criminogenic) law. It includes a review of related studies on such laws and their criminal side-effects, the change in the legislator’s liability for effects of enacted laws, and the effects of the legislator’s afflatus on the potential criminogenic effects of law. Of special concern are cases where the legislator is aware of the potential criminogenic side-effects of a new law but carelessly neglects them. The study evaluates the tool for detection of probable (...)
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  32. Chamundeeswari Kuppuswamy (2009). The International Legal Governance of the Human Genome. Routledge.score: 69.0
    This book explores international governance of the human genome from a human rights perspective and challenges paradigms of property that are entrenched in relevant international instruments.
     
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  33. Jean V. McHale (2003). Nursing and Human Rights. Butterworth Heinemann.score: 66.0
    " This book focuses on the relationship between human rights and nursing in these changing times.
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  34. Carlo Casonato (ed.) (2007). Life, Technology, and Law: Second Forum for Transnational and Comparative Legal Dialogue, Levico Terme, Italy, June 9-10, 2006: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Cedam.score: 66.0
  35. Edward McWhinney, Sienho Yee & Jacques-Yvan Morin (eds.) (2009). Multiculturalism and International Law: Essays in Honour of Edward Mcwhinney. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.score: 66.0
    This volume examines the role and influence of multiculturalism in general theories of international law; in the composition and functioning of international ...
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  36. Isabel Karpin (2012). Perfecting Pregnancy: Law, Disability, and the Future of Reproduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Disability; 2. Risk; 3. Terminations; 4. De-selections; 5. Interpretations; 6. Futures.
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  37. Hazel Biggs (2010). Healthcare Research Ethics and Law: Regulation, Review and Responsibility. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 66.0
    The book explores and explains the relationship between law and ethics in the context of medically related research in order to provide a practical guide to ...
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  38. Andrius Lygutas (2009). Rights in the Context of Counter-Terrorism Measures: United States of America. Jurisprudence 117 (3):145-161.score: 66.0
    The terror attacks of September 11, 2001, facilitated a transformation in federal Governance in the United States of America (hereinafter – the USA). The events of that day showed that the counter-terrorism system of the USA was ineffective. Law enforcement agencies failed to prevent terrorist attacks and thus changes were necessary. The most significant transformations were the following: dozens of new laws were passed; the bureaucracy of the US Government was reorganized; a war was launched to eliminate a sanctuary that (...)
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  39. Anne T. Gallagher (2011). Improving the Effectiveness of the International Law of Human Trafficking: A Vision for the Future of the US Trafficking in Persons Reports. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (3):381-400.score: 66.0
    In 2000, the United States Congress passed the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act requiring its State Department to issue annual Trafficking in Persons Reports (TIP Reports) describing “the nature and extent of severe forms of trafficking in persons” and assessing governmental efforts across the world to combat such trafficking against criteria established by US law. This article examines the opportunities and risks presented by the TIP Reports, tracing their evolution over the past decade and considering their impact on (...)
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  40. Saku Machino & Satoko Tatsui (eds.) (2009). Hito Yurai Shiryō No Kenkyū Riyō: Shiryō No Saishu Kara Baio Banku Made = the Use of Human Biological Samples in Research. Hatsubai Gyōsei.score: 66.0
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  41. Ulf Schmidt (2004). Justice at Nuremberg: Leo Alexander and the Nazi Doctors' Trial. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 66.0
    Justice at Nuremberg traces the history of the Nuremberg Doctors' Trial held in 1946-47, as seen through the eyes of the Austrian bliogemigrbliogé psychiatrist Leo Alexander. His investigations helped the United States to prosecute twenty German doctors and three administrators for war crimes and crimes against humanity. The legacy of Nuremberg was profound. In the Nuremberg code--a landmark in the history of modern medical ethics--the judges laid down, for the first time, international guidelines for permissible experiments on humans. One of (...)
     
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  42. Richard A. Epstein (2008). Should Antidiscrimination Laws Limit Freedom of Association? The Dangerous Allure of Human Rights Legislation. Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):123-156.score: 63.5
    This article defends the classical liberal view of human interactions that gives strong protection to associational freedom except in cases that involve the use of force or fraud or the exercise of monopoly power. That conception is at war with the modern antidiscrimination or human rights laws that operate in competitive markets in such vital areas as employment and housing, with respect to matters of race, sex, age, and increasingly, disability. The article further argues that using the label (...)
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  43. Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 63.0
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous research participant may have significant bearing (...)
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  44. Courtney Hillebrecht (2012). Implementing International Human Rights Law at Home: Domestic Politics and the European Court of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (3):279-301.score: 63.0
    The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) boasts one of the strongest oversight systems in international human rights law, but implementing the ECtHR’s rulings is an inherently domestic and political process. This article begins to bridge the gap between the Court in Strasbourg and the domestic process of implementing the Court’s rulings by looking at the domestic institutions and politics that surround the execution of the ECtHR’s judgments. Using case studies from the UK and Russia, this article identifies (...)
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  45. Jacqueline A. Laing (2008). Food and Fluids: Human Law, Human Rights and Human Interests. In C. Tollefsen (ed.), Artificial Nutrition and Hydration. Springer Press. 77--100.score: 63.0
    The experience of the twentieth century bears witness to the abuse, mutilation and homicide of the vulnerable made possible by the power of the state, mass markets, and medical and financial interests. Suggestions for reform of the law regarding food and fluids typically take place in the context of utilitarian personistic “quality-of-life” presuppositions, and interests in shifting legal responsibility for life-and-death decisions, medical research, drug trials, organ harvesting as well as more mundane bureaucratic concerns like bed-clearing. With the Western world (...)
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  46. Pamela A. Andanda (2006). The Law and Regulation of Clinical Research: Interplay with Public Policy and Bioethics. Focus Publilshers.score: 63.0
     
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  47. Zelman Cowen (1985/1986). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.score: 63.0
     
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  48. Susan L. Crockin (2010). Legal Conceptions: The Evolving Law and Policy of Assisted Reproductive Technologies. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 63.0
    Embryo litigation -- Access to ART treatment : insurance and discrimination -- General professional liability litigation -- Paternity and donor insemination -- Maternity and egg donation -- Traditional and gestational surrogacy arrangements -- Posthumous reproduction : access and parentage -- Same-sex parentage and ART -- Genetics (PGD) and ART -- ART-related embryonic stem cell legal developments -- ART-related adoption litigation -- ART-related fetal litigation and abortion-related litigation.
     
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  49. André den Exter (ed.) (2010). Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu.score: 63.0
     
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