Search results for 'Human cloning Law and legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    D. E. Cutas (2008). Illegal Beings. Human Cloning and the Law. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):510-510.
    A Professor of Law at Santa Clara University, Kerry Lynn Mackintosh presents us with a rigorously structured book on anticloning legislation. Although written for US readers and thus focusing on US context and legislation, the book is very much relevant internationally, due to the similarities between the various anticloning legislative endeavours and between their underlying premises.The book is divided into three parts. In Part I, Macintosh identifies and discusses the five most common sources of objections to human (...)
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  2. Samuel Mejías Valbuena (2005). Philosophical, Scientist, Moral, Ethics and Religious Analysis in the Juridical Compared Science in the Law of Cloning. S. Mejías Valbuena.
     
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  3. Judit Sándor & Violeta Beširević (eds.) (2009). Perfect Copy?: Law and Ethics of Reproductive Medicine. Cenger for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine.
     
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  4. Judit Sándor & Violeta Beširević (eds.) (2009). Perfect Copy?: Law and Ethics of Reproductive Medicine. Center for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine.
     
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  5.  11
    L. Bernier (2004). Reproductive and Therapeutic Cloning, Germline Therapy, and Purchase of Gametes and Embryos: Comments on Canadian Legislation Governing Reproduction Technologies. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):527-532.
    In Canada, the Assisted Human Reproduction Act received royal assent on 29 March 2004. The approach proposed by the federal government responds to Canadians’ strong desire for an enforceable legislative framework in the field of reproduction technologies through criminal law. As a result of the widening gap between the rapid pace of technological change and governing legislation, a distinct need was perceived to create a regulatory framework to guide decisions regarding reproductive technologies.In this article the three main topics (...)
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  6. Ann-Kathrin Hirschmüller (2009). Internationales Verbot des Humanklonens: Die Verhandlungen in der Uno. P. Lang.
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  7. Eduardo de Oliveira Leite & Adriana Cristine Arent (eds.) (2004). Grandes Temas da Atualidade: Bioética E Biodireito. Editora Forense.
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  8. Gérard Teboul (ed.) (2004). Procréation Et Droits de L'Enfant: Actes des Rencontres Internationales Organisées les 16, 17 Et 18 Septembre 2003 à Marseille Par l'Observatoire International du Droit de la Bioéthique Et de la Médecine [Sic]. [REVIEW] Nemesis.
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  9. Naigen Zhang & Mireille Delmas-Marty (eds.) (2002). Ke Long Ren: Fa Lü Yu She Hui. Fu Dan da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  10. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects (...)
     
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  11.  1
    Robyn S. Shapiro (2003). Legislative Research Bans on Human Cloning. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (04):393-400.
    Recently, the U.S. House of Representatives voted, for the second time in two years, to ban all human-cloning research, whether the research involves reproduction or creating cells that might be used to understand and treat disease. As I explain in this article, the proposed legislation has important implications not only for human cloning research but also for research in general.
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  12.  14
    Roger Brownsword, W. R. Cornish & Margaret Llewelyn (eds.) (1998). Law and Human Genetics: Regulating a Revolution. Hart Pub..
    This special issue of the Modern Law Review addresses a range of key issues - conceptual, ethical, political and practical - arising from the regulatory ...
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  13.  11
    David W. Meyers (2006). The Human Body and the Law: A Medico-Legal Study. Aldine Transaction.
    Thus, Meyers provides a valuable account, not only of current medical attitudes, but also of relevant case and statute law as it stands at present.
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  14.  8
    Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
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  15.  14
    David W. Meyers (1990). The Human Body and the Law. Stanford University Press.
    Mother and Fetus: Rights in Conflict A. INTRODUCTION After fertilization of the female egg (ovum) with male sperm the resulting zygote may implant ...
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  16. García San José & I. Daniel (2010). International Bio Law: An International Overview of Developments in Human Embryo Research and Experimentation. Ediciones Laborum.
     
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  17. Thérèse Murphy (ed.) (2009). New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
    The first IVF baby was born in the 1970s. Less than 20 years later, we had cloning and GM food, and information and communication technologies had transformed everyday life. In 2000, the human genome was sequenced. More recently, there has been much discussion of the economic and social benefits of nanotechnology, and synthetic biology has also been generating controversy. This important volume is a timely contribution to increasing calls for regulation - or better regulation - of these and (...)
     
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  18.  7
    Nestor Micheli Morales (2009). Psychological and Ideological Aspects of Human Cloning: A Transition to a Transhumanist Psychology. Journal of Evolution and Technology 20 (2):19-42.
    The prospect of replication of human beings through genetic manipulation has engendered one of the most controversial debates about reproduction in our society. Ideology is clearly influencing the direction of research and legislation on human cloning, which may present one of the greatest existential challenges to the meaning of creation. In this article, I argue that, in view of the possibility that human cloning and other emerging technologies could enhance physical and cognitive abilities, there (...)
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  19.  37
    Richard A. Epstein (2008). Should Antidiscrimination Laws Limit Freedom of Association? The Dangerous Allure of Human Rights Legislation. Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):123-156.
    This article defends the classical liberal view of human interactions that gives strong protection to associational freedom except in cases that involve the use of force or fraud or the exercise of monopoly power. That conception is at war with the modern antidiscrimination or human rights laws that operate in competitive markets in such vital areas as employment and housing, with respect to matters of race, sex, age, and increasingly, disability. The article further argues that using the label (...)
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  20.  5
    Shaun Pattinson & Timothy Caulfield (2004). Variations and Voids: The Regulation of Human Cloning Around the World. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 5 (1):1-8.
    Background No two countries have adopted identical regulatory measures on cloning. Understanding the complexity of these regulatory variations is essential. It highlights the challenges associated with the regulation of a controversial and rapidly evolving area of science and sheds light on a regulatory framework that can accommodate this reality. Methods Using the most reliable information available, we have performed a survey of the regulatory position of thirty countries around the world regarding the creation and use of cloned embryos (see (...)
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  21.  1
    D. Morgan (2004). Cell Phoney: Human Cloning After Quintavalle. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):524-526.
    Reproductive cloning has thrown up new scientific possibilities, ethical conundrums, and legal challenges. An initial question, considered by the English courts in 2003, was whether the technique presently available, that of cell nucleus replacement, falls outside the provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. If it does, the creation and use, including use in research protocols, of human embryos would be unregulated, disclosing a need to consider remedial legislation. The resolution by the courts of (...)
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  22.  29
    Timothy Caulfield (2003). Human Cloning Laws, Human Dignity and the Poverty of the Policy Making Dialogue. BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-7.
    Background The regulation of human cloning continues to be a significant national and international policy issue. Despite years of intense academic and public debate, there is little clarity as to the philosophical foundations for many of the emerging policy choices. The notion of "human dignity" is commonly used to justify cloning laws. The basis for this justification is that reproductive human cloning necessarily infringes notions of human dignity. Discussion The author critiques one of (...)
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  23.  4
    A. V. Campbell, S. A. M. McLean, K. Gutridge & H. Harper (2008). Human Tissue Legislation: Listening to the Professionals. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):104-108.
    The controversies in Bristol, Alder Hey and elsewhere in the UK surrounding the removal and retention of human tissue and organs have led to extensive law reform in all three UK legal systems. This paper reports a short study of the reactions of a range of health professionals to these changes. Three main areas of ethical concern were noted: the balancing of individual rights and social benefit; the efficacy of the new procedures for consent; and the helpfulness for professional (...)
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  24.  0
    A. V. Campbell, S. A. M. McLean, K. Gutridge & H. Harper (2008). Human Tissue Legislation: Listening to the Professionals. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):104-108.
    The controversies in Bristol, Alder Hey and elsewhere in the UK surrounding the removal and retention of human tissue and organs have led to extensive law reform in all three UK legal systems. This paper reports a short study of the reactions of a range of health professionals to these changes. Three main areas of ethical concern were noted: the balancing of individual rights and social benefit; the efficacy of the new procedures for consent; and the helpfulness for professional (...)
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  25.  10
    Jacqueline A. Laing (2008). Food and Fluids: Human Law, Human Rights and Human Interests. In C. Tollefsen (ed.), Artificial Nutrition and Hydration. Springer Press 77--100.
    The experience of the twentieth century bears witness to the abuse, mutilation and homicide of the vulnerable made possible by the power of the state, mass markets, and medical and financial interests. Suggestions for reform of the law regarding food and fluids typically take place in the context of utilitarian personistic “quality-of-life” presuppositions, and interests in shifting legal responsibility for life-and-death decisions, medical research, drug trials, organ harvesting as well as more mundane bureaucratic concerns like bed-clearing. With the Western world (...)
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  26.  4
    Aileen Kavanagh (2004). The Elusive Divide Between Interpretation and Legislation Under the Human Rights Act 1998. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 24 (2):259-285.
    In recent case-law under the Human Rights Act 1998, the senior judiciary have reiterated the view that their task under section 3(1) of the Act is one of ‘interpretation rather than legislation’. This article has two main aims. The first is to provide a general, theoretical analysis of the extent to which it is possible (if at all) to distinguish between interpretation and legislation. The second is to examine the judicial understanding of this distinction, as revealed through (...)
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  27.  4
    Jacqueline A. Laing (2008). Inter-Species Embryos and Human Clones: Issues of Free Movement and Gestation. European Journal of Health Law 15: 421-431.
    The United Kingdom's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill, introduced into Parliament on the 8th of November 2007 contains a number of controversial proposals inter alia expressly permitting the creation of inter-species embryos for research and destruction and increasing the scope for human cloning also for destructive research. It is supposed that there ought not to be a blanket ban on the creation of human clones, hybrids, cybrids and chimeras because these embryos are valuable for research purposes. (...)
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  28.  12
    A. Alghrani (2009). The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008: A Missed Opportunity? Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):718-719.
    The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008: a missed opportunity?Amel AlghraniCorrespondence to Dr Amel Alghrani, Institute for Science, Ethics and Innovation, Centre for Social Ethics and Policy, School of Law, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL; amel.alghrani@manchester.ac.ukReceived 16 September 2009 Accepted 24 September 2009 Regulating reproduction is no easy feat. In the past three decades we have witnessed a reproductive revolution and great strides have been made to alleviate the effects of infertility. Reproductive advances such as in-vitro (...)
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  29.  19
    Marie Thérèse Meulders-Klein, Ruth Deech & P. Vlaardingerbroek (eds.) (2002). Biomedicine, the Family, and Human Rights. Kluwer Law International.
    This volume examines the impact of advances in genetics and assisted reproduction technologies on family law, human rights and the rights of the child, ...
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  30.  10
    Sondra Harcourt & Mark Harcourt (2002). Do Employers Comply with Civil/Human Rights Legislation? New Evidence From New Zealand Job Application Forms. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):207 - 221.
    This study assesses the extent to which job application forms violate the New Zealand Human Rights Act. The sample for the study includes 229 job application forms, collected from a variety of large and small, public- and private-sector organizations that together employ approximately 200,000 workers. Two hundred and four or 88% of the job application forms contain at least one violation of the Act. One hundred and sixty five or 72% contain two or more and 140 or 61% contain (...)
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  31.  18
    Antoinette Rouvroy (2008). Human Genes and Neoliberal Governance: A Foucauldian Critique. Routledge-Cavendish.
    The production of genetic knowledge -- Scientific and economic strength of genetic reductionism -- Policy implications : discourses of genetic enlightenment as new disciplinary devices -- Genetic conceptualizations of normality and the idea of genetic justice -- Beyond genetic universality and authenticity, the lure of the genetic underclass -- Previews of the future as background -- Economic and actuarial perspective on genetics and insurance -- Practical and normative arguments against genetic exceptionalist legislation -- The changing social role of private (...)
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  32. Chamundeeswari Kuppuswamy (2009). The International Legal Governance of the Human Genome. Routledge.
    This book explores international governance of the human genome from a human rights perspective and challenges paradigms of property that are entrenched in relevant international instruments.
     
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  33.  90
    Leon Kass (1998). The Ethics of Human Cloning. Aei Press.
    Wilson and Kass talked about their book, The ethics of human cloning, which is about the ethical debate over human cloning.
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  34.  4
    Katrien Devolder (2007). Review of Kerry Lynn Macintosh, Illegal Beings. Human Clones and the Law. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):97-98.
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  35.  9
    Edward McWhinney, Sienho Yee & Jacques-Yvan Morin (eds.) (2009). Multiculturalism and International Law: Essays in Honour of Edward Mcwhinney. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.
    This volume examines the role and influence of multiculturalism in general theories of international law; in the composition and functioning of international ...
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  36.  27
    Jean V. McHale (2003). Nursing and Human Rights. Butterworth Heinemann.
    " This book focuses on the relationship between human rights and nursing in these changing times.
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  37.  6
    Hazel Biggs (2010). Healthcare Research Ethics and Law: Regulation, Review and Responsibility. Routledge-Cavendish.
    The book explores and explains the relationship between law and ethics in the context of medically related research in order to provide a practical guide to ...
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  38.  19
    Carlo Casonato (ed.) (2007). Life, Technology, and Law: Second Forum for Transnational and Comparative Legal Dialogue, Levico Terme, Italy, June 9-10, 2006: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Cedam.
  39.  7
    Isabel Karpin (2012). Perfecting Pregnancy: Law, Disability, and the Future of Reproduction. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Disability; 2. Risk; 3. Terminations; 4. De-selections; 5. Interpretations; 6. Futures.
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  40. Saku Machino & Satoko Tatsui (eds.) (2009). Hito Yurai Shiryō No Kenkyū Riyō: Shiryō No Saishu Kara Baio Banku Made = the Use of Human Biological Samples in Research. Hatsubai Gyōsei.
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  41. Sheila Mclean (1999). Old Law, New Medicine Medical Ethics and Human Rights.
     
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  42.  44
    Robert McCorquodale (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility and International Human Rights Law. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):385 - 400.
    The United Nations Special Representative on Transnational Corporations and Human Rights, John Ruggie, has adopted a new framework for considering this issue within the international legal system. This article examines this framework in terms of its coherence, its consistency with international human rights law and how it can be 'operationalized' (which is required by the United Nations). In regard to the states legal obligation to protect human rights, it is considered whether this obligation is broader and deeper (...)
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  43.  2
    Matthew Weed (2005). Discourse on Embryo Science and Human Cloning in the United States and Great Britain: 1984?2002. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 33 (4):802-810.
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  44.  9
    Laurentiu Staicu (2012). Human Cloning and the Myth of Disenchantment. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):148-169.
    This study has a twofold objective: firstly, it aims to examine the main types of argument that have been formulated against human cloning, to identify their presuppositions and to evaluate their strength; secondly, it aims to argue that the most important objections against human cloning are philosophical and religious, in particular the objection that human cloning represents a radical form of disenchantment or an abuse of rationality. The birth of a cloned mammal, a sheep (...)
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  45. Rosamund Scott (2007). Choosing Between Possible Lives: Law and Ethics of Prenatal and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Hart.
  46. Pamela A. Andanda (2006). The Law and Regulation of Clinical Research: Interplay with Public Policy and Bioethics. Focus Publilshers.
     
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  47.  44
    Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous research participant may have significant bearing (...)
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  48. Zelman Cowen (1985/1986). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.
     
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  49. Susan L. Crockin (2010). Legal Conceptions: The Evolving Law and Policy of Assisted Reproductive Technologies. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Embryo litigation -- Access to ART treatment : insurance and discrimination -- General professional liability litigation -- Paternity and donor insemination -- Maternity and egg donation -- Traditional and gestational surrogacy arrangements -- Posthumous reproduction : access and parentage -- Same-sex parentage and ART -- Genetics (PGD) and ART -- ART-related embryonic stem cell legal developments -- ART-related adoption litigation -- ART-related fetal litigation and abortion-related litigation.
     
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  50. André den Exter (ed.) (2010). Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu.
     
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