Search results for 'Human ecology Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Karl Payne (ed.) (2010). How Much is Enough?: Buddhism, Consumerism, and the Human Environment. Wisdom Publications.score: 396.0
    "In this book, the effects of our own decisions and actions on the human environment are examined from several different perspectives, all informed Buddhist thought.
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  2. Ecology--Religious Aspects Human (1992). Clergy and Scientists for the Environment. BioScience 42 (8):624-625.score: 280.0
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  3. Padmasiri De Silva (1998). Environmental Philosophy and Ethics in Buddhism. St. Martin's Press.score: 234.0
    This work introduces the reader to the central issues and theories in Western environmental ethics, and against this background develops a Buddhist environmental philosophy and ethics. Drawing material from original sources, there is a lucid exposition of Buddhist environmentalism, its ethics, economics and Buddhist perspectives for environmental education. The work is focused on a diagnosis of the contemporary environmental crisis and a Buddhist contribution for positive solutions. Replete with stories and illustrations from original Buddhist sources, it is both informative and (...)
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  4. Pragati Sahni (2008). Environmental Ethics in Buddhism: A Virtues Approach. Routledge.score: 234.0
    This work gives an innovative approach to the subject, which puts forward a distinctly Buddhist environmental ethics that is in harmony with traditional ...
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  5. Stephanie Kaza & Kenneth Kraft (eds.) (2000). Dharma Rain: Sources of Buddhist Environmentalism. Shambhala Publications.score: 225.0
    A comprehensive collection of classic texts, contemporary interpretations, guidelines for activists, issue-specific information, and materials for environmentally-oriented religious practice. Sources and contributors include Basho, the Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh, Gary Snyder, Chogyam Trungpa, Gretel Ehrlich, Peter Mathiessen, Helen Tworkov (editor of Tricycle ), and Philip Glass.
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  6. Dieter Steiner & Markus Nauser (eds.) (1993). Human Ecology: Fragments of Anti-Fragmentary Views of the World. Routledge.score: 224.0
    The book creates a framework for a cohesive discourse, for a "new human ecology".
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  7. Mark Coeckelbergh (2013). Pervasion of What? Techno–Human Ecologies and Their Ubiquitous Spirits. AI and Society 28 (1):55-63.score: 208.0
    Are the robots coming? Is the singularity near? Will we be dominated by technology? The usual response to ethical issues raised by pervasive and ubiquitous technologies assumes a philosophical anthropology centered on existential autonomy and agency, a dualistic ontology separating humans from technology and the natural from the artificial, and a post-monotheistic dualist and creational spirituality. This paper explores an alternative, less modern vision of the “technological” future based on different assumptions: a “deep relational” view of human being and (...)
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  8. Bram Tucker & Lisa Rende Taylor (2007). The Human Behavioral Ecology of Contemporary World Issues. Human Nature 18 (3):181-189.score: 198.0
    Human behavioral ecology (HBE) began as an attempt to explain human economic, reproductive, and social behavior using neodarwinian theory in concert with theory from ecology and economics, and ethnographic methods. HBE has addressed subsistence decision-making, cooperation, life history trade-offs, parental investment, mate choice, and marriage strategies among hunter-gatherers, herders, peasants, and wage earners in rural and urban settings throughout the world. Despite our rich insights into human behavior, HBE has very rarely been used as a (...)
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  9. A. Terry Rambo (1983). Conceptual Approaches to Human Ecology. East-West Environment and Policy Institute.score: 196.0
     
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  10. Flor Ángela Tobón & López Giraldo (2013). Psychosocial accompaniment from human ecology toyoung marginalized people to prevent drug dependence. Humanidades Médicas 13 (2):348-371.score: 168.0
    Introducción: Se presenta un análisis cualitativo del acompañamiento psicosocial a jóvenes en condiciones de vulnerabilidad desde la ecología humana durante 12 meses entre 2010 a 2011; utilizando técnicas pedagógicas evaluativas participativas. Éstas, son una alternativa para crear espacios reflexivos con el propósito de potenciar la resiliencia en las relaciones comunicativas y formar en el respeto. Objetivo: Generar bienestar, prevenir la farmacodependencia y contribuir a la promoción de la salud. Material y Métodos: Se revisaron los antecedentes temáticos, fueron seleccionados 100 estudiantes (...)
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  11. S. Boyden (1993). Human Ecology and Biohistory: Conceptual Approaches to Understanding Human Situation in the Biosphere. In Dieter Steiner & Markus Nauser (eds.), Human Ecology: Fragments of Anti-Fragmentary Views of the World. Routledge.score: 168.0
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  12. Roderick J. Lawrence (1993). Can Human Ecology Provide an Integrative Framework? The Contribution of Structuration Theory to Contemporary Debate. In Dieter Steiner & Markus Nauser (eds.), Human Ecology: Fragments of Anti-Fragmentary Views of the World. Routledge. 213--228.score: 168.0
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  13. Jia-cai Zhang & Hui Yan (2008). A New Environmental Philosophy and The Re-Establishing of Human Ecology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:169-174.score: 168.0
    Environment is essentially in the category of culture and environmental research should be based on human value and culture. The study of the relationship between humans and their natural environment should also refer to human relations. Since the operational logic of social capital is the root of ecological crisis, the ultimate solution to this problem lies in human’s correct thinking, institutional, political and behavioral patterns in dealing with nature. Re-establishing human ecology therefore provides a cultural (...)
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  14. Ricardo Díez-Hochleitner (2008). A Dialogue Between East and West: Looking to a Human Revolution. I.B. Tauris.score: 165.0
    How far do cultures affect the future of the planet? Can the debate on the environment and global warming be influenced by the cultures of East and West understanding each other better? In this consistently provocative dialogue, two of the most influential thinkers of recent times propose that only a 'human revolution' - a shift in the hearts and minds of individuals - can stimulate a revolution in humanity's relationship with the planet. Such a planetary revolution first requires a (...)
     
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  15. Michael Gurven (2004). To Give and to Give Not: The Behavioral Ecology of Human Food Transfers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):543-559.score: 156.0
    The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among unrelated individuals, has led researchers to evaluate numerous hypotheses about the adaptive functions and patterns of sharing in different ecologies. This article attempts to organize available cross-cultural evidence pertaining to several contentious evolutionary models: kin selection, reciprocal altruism, tolerated scrounging, and costly signaling. Debates about the relevance of these models focus primarily on the extent (...)
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  16. Ron Epstein, The Inner Ecology: Buddhist Ethics and Practice.score: 146.0
    Buddhists call Buddhism the Buddha Dharma: the Dharma, a collection of methods for getting enlightened, taught by a Buddha, a Fully Enlightened One. Buddhists refer to themselves as people who have taken refuge with the Three Jewels: 1) the Buddhas or Fully Enlightened Ones, 2) the Dharma or methods taught for reaching enlightenment, 3) and the Sangha or community of Buddhist monks and nuns, called Bhikshus and Bhikshunis. In formally becoming a Buddhist one becomes a disciple of a Buddhist (...)
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  17. Sally Goerner (2000). Dynamic Evolution: Rules for Building a Solid Human Ecology. World Futures 55 (1):91-103.score: 146.0
    Our civilization is changing and so is our science. Human beings in endeavors from education to economics need a framework for understanding which integrates the maelstrom of insights into a useable form. That, in essence, is what the study of Dynamic Evolution provides. Dynamic Evolution (also called Cosmic or General Evolution) is a synthesis of insights, ancient and cutting edge, which radically revamps our understanding of how organizations arise and how change takes place as a result of intertwined forces (...)
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  18. Harold Glasser (2011). Naess's Deep Ecology: Implications for the Human Prospect and Challenges for the Future. Inquiry 54 (1):52-77.score: 144.0
    What sets Naess's deep ecology apart from most inquiries into environmental philosophy is that it does not seek a radical shift in fundamental values. Naess offered a utopian, life-affirming grand narrative, a new Weltanschauung that shifted the focus of inquiry to coupling values, knowledge, understanding, and wisdom to behavior. The core of Naess's approach is that sustainability hinges on developing more thoroughly reasoned and consistent views, policies, and actions, which are tied back to wide-identifying ultimate norms and a rich, (...)
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  19. Peter D. Hershock (2000). Dramatic Intervention: Human Rights From a Buddhist Perspective. Philosophy East and West 50 (1):9-33.score: 144.0
    In light of such basic Buddhist teachings as karma and interdependence, the conceptions of "rights" and "human being" presupposed by the dominant currents in contemporary human rights discourse are critically evaluated here. The negative recusiveness of such a discourse and its promotion of minimum standards for secure coexistence is examined, and a Buddhist perspective on human rights forwarded in which realizing our dramatic interdependence and social virtuosity are held paramount.
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  20. Simon P. James (2000). “Thing-Centered” Holism in Buddhism, Heidegger, and Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):359-375.score: 144.0
    I address the problem of reconciling environmental holism with the intrinsic value of individual beings. Drawing upon Madhyamaka (“middle way”) Buddhism, the later philosophy of Martin Heidegger, and deep ecology, I present a distinctly holistic conception of nature that, nevertheless, retains a commitment to the intrinsic worth of individual beings. I conclude with an examination of the practical implications of this “thing-centered holism” for environmental ethics.
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  21. Philip Kitcher (1990). Developmental Decomposition and the Future of Human Behavioral Ecology. Philosophy of Science 57 (1):96-117.score: 144.0
    I attempt to complement my earlier critiques of human sociobiology, by offering an account of how evolutionary ideas might legitimately be employed in the study of human social behavior. The main emphasis of the paper is the need to integrate studies of proximate mechanisms and their ontogenesis with functional/evolutionary research. Human psychological complexity makes it impossible to focus simply on specific types of human behavior and ask for their functional significance. For any of the kinds of (...)
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  22. Eugene Rice (2005). Buddhist Compassion as a Foundation for Human Rights. Social Philosophy Today 21:95-108.score: 144.0
    The basic philosophical question underlying the Asian values debates is whether human rights represent a universal moral concern applicable to humans in every culture or whether they are simply another form of Western imperialism. While most of the philosophical work on this issue has focused on Confucian and Marxist elements, there is a growing interest in tackling the topic from a Buddhist perspective. This paper evaluates Jay Garfield’s attempt to reconcile Buddhist ethics with Western-style human rights. Garfield endeavors (...)
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  23. Vyacheslav Kudashov (2006). The Global Ecology of Human Consciousness. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 9:15-20.score: 144.0
    Nowadays the real threat has appeared: "thinking man" will disappear from the planet, and his place will be taken by "information consuming man." The rapidly evolving spiritually dependent consumer will turn into a completely controlled human being. A value orientation that we did not create will entirely determine all our choices and dominate our attention. Both the values and the products of mass culture are being spread among consumers as extensively as possible by mechanisms of culture manufacture, in accord (...)
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  24. William Hasker (2005). "The End of Human Life": Buddhist, Process, and Open Theist Perspectives. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):183–195.score: 140.0
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  25. Allan Gibbard (2001). Living with Meanings: A Human Ecology. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 75 (2):59 - 78.score: 140.0
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  26. Svend Riemer (1950). Book Review:Human Behavior and the Principle of Least Effort. An Introduction to Human Ecology George K. Zipf. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 17 (2):204-.score: 140.0
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  27. Valerie A. Haines (1985). From Organicist to Relational Human Ecology. Sociological Theory 3 (1):65-74.score: 140.0
  28. Bill Devall (1981). Environment, Technology and Health: Human Ecology in Historic Perspective. Environmental Ethics 3 (1):85-95.score: 140.0
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  29. Owen Flanagan (1996). Ethics Naturalized: Ethics as Human Ecology. In L. May, Michael Friedman & A. Clark (eds.), Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. Mit Press. 19--44.score: 140.0
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  30. Sargent (1965). Human Ecology and Demography, Harvard University. BioScience 15 (8):532-533.score: 140.0
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  31. Charles Susanne (1999). Human Ecology: A Matter of Ethics. Global Bioethics 11:119-126.score: 140.0
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  32. Paul T. Baker (1965). Readings in Human Ecology Jack Bresler. BioScience 15 (8):534-534.score: 140.0
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  33. George Colin Lawder Bertram (1951). Eugenics and Human Ecology. The Eugenics Review 43 (1):11.score: 140.0
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  34. Maciej Henneberg (2009). Human Ecology [Ekologia Człowieka]. Volumes 1 and 2. By Napoleon Wolański. Pp. 500+Xvii; 528+Xvi. (Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, Warsaw, 2006.) Vol. 1 ISBN 978-83-01-14671-9; Vol. 2 ISBN 978-83-01-14864-5. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 41 (4):558-559.score: 140.0
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  35. David L. Jameson (1970). Review Feature Population, Resources, Environment: Issues in Human Ecology P. R. Ehrlich A. H. Ehrlich. BioScience 20 (21):1177-1177.score: 140.0
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  36. F. Webster McBryde & Alfredo S. Costales (1969). Human Ecology of Northwestern Colombia (The Chocó). BioScience 19 (5):432-436.score: 140.0
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  37. O. de Selincourt (1936). Human Ecology.By J. W. Bews, M.A., D.Sc, Principal of the Natal University College, Pietermaritzburg. With an Introduction by General The Rt. Hon. J. C. Smuts, P.C., C.H., F.R.S. (Oxford: University Press. London: Humphrey Milford, 1935. Pp. Xii + 312. Price 15s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 11 (43):377-.score: 140.0
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  38. L. B. Slobodkin (1982). Kudos for Human Ecology Analysis Human Adaptability Emilio F. Moran. BioScience 32 (4):288-288.score: 140.0
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  39. L. P. Gerlach & L. P. Novak (1965). Human Ecology at the University of Minnesota. BioScience 15 (8):529-529.score: 140.0
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  40. Hinkle (1965). Division of Human Ecology, Cornell Medical Center. BioScience 15 (8):532-532.score: 140.0
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  41. Hinkle (1965). Studies of Human Ecology in Relation to Health and Behavior. BioScience 15 (8):517-520.score: 140.0
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  42. Hugh H. Iltis (1970). Man First? Man Last? The Paradox of Human Ecology. BioScience 20 (14):820-820.score: 140.0
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  43. Laurence Irving (1965). Human Ecology in Alaska. BioScience 15 (8):529-530.score: 140.0
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  44. Duvall A. Jones (1970). Tropical Ecology Human Ecology in the Tropics J. P. Garlick R. W. J. Keay. BioScience 20 (20):1123-1123.score: 140.0
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  45. Lajos Andras Kiss (2009). Chances of Human Ecology. Filozofia 64 (2):166-176.score: 140.0
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  46. Dallas K. Meyer (1965). A Course in Human Ecology and Behavioral Science in Medical School, University of Missouri School of Medicine. BioScience 15 (8):527-528.score: 140.0
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  47. Norman Myers (1988). A Small Investment... The Environment, Public Health and Human Ecology: Considerations for Economic Development James A. Lee. [REVIEW] BioScience 38 (2):120-120.score: 140.0
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  48. Clare Palmer (1997). TN Khoshoo, Mahatma Gandhi: An Apostle of Applied Human Ecology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (6):392-395.score: 140.0
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  49. David E. Reichle (1972). Human Ecology Man and the Environment: An Introduction to Human Ecology and Evolution Arthur S. Boughey. BioScience 22 (6):385-386.score: 140.0
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  50. Walter J. Rogan (1979). Overview of Environmentalism Environment, Technology, and Health: Human Ecology in Historical Perspective Merril Eisenbud. BioScience 29 (10):623-623.score: 140.0
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