Search results for 'Human embryo Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kathryn Ehrich, Clare Williams & Bobbie Farsides (2010). Consenting Futures: Professional Views on Social, Clinical and Ethical Aspects of Information Feedback to Embryo Donors in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Clinical Ethics 5 (2):77-85.score: 1096.0
    This paper reports from an ongoing multidisciplinary, ethnographic study that is exploring the views, values and practices (the ethical frameworks) drawn on by professional staff in assisted conception units and stem cell laboratories in relation to embryo donation for research purposes, particularly human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, in the UK. We focus here on the connection between possible incidental findings and the circumstances in which embryos are donated for hESC research, and report some of the uncertainties (...)
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  2. Louis M. Guenin (2008). The Morality of Embryo Use. Cambridge University Press.score: 1059.0
    Is it permissible to use a human embryo in stem cell research, or in general as a means for benefit of others? Acknowledging each embryo as an object of moral concern, Louis M.Guenin argues that it is morally permissible to decline intrauterine transfer of an embryo formed outside the body, and that from this permission and the duty of beneficence, there follows a consensus justification for using donated embryos in service of humanitarian ends. He then (...)
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  3. Thomas F. Banchoff (2011). Embryo Politics: Ethics and Policy in Atlantic Democracies. Cornell University Press.score: 988.0
    The emergence of ethical controversy -- First embryo research regimes -- The ethics of embryonic stem cell research -- Stem cell and cloning politics.
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  4. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.score: 882.0
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, (...)
     
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  5. Dora García Fernández & Martha Tarasco Michel (eds.) (2011). Bioética: Un Acercamiento Médico y Jurídico. Universidad Anáhuac.score: 768.0
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  6. Sang-ik Hwang (2007). Saengmyŏng Konghak Palchŏn E Issŏsŏ Ŭi Inmunhak Ŭi Kiyŏ Pangan: 'Chulgi Sepʻo Satʻae' Ŭi Sŏngchʻal Ŭl Tʻonghayŏ. Kyŏngje Inmun Sahoe YŏnʼGuhoe.score: 768.0
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  7. Gérard Teboul (ed.) (2004). Procréation Et Droits de L'Enfant: Actes des Rencontres Internationales Organisées les 16, 17 Et 18 Septembre 2003 à Marseille Par l'Observatoire International du Droit de la Bioéthique Et de la Médecine [Sic]. [REVIEW] Nemesis.score: 768.0
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  8. Thomas Wabel (ed.) (2004). Grenzen der Verfügbarkeit: Menschenwürde Und Embryonenschutz Im Gespräch Zwischen Theologie Und Rechtswissenschaft. Humanitas.score: 768.0
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  9. Ann-Kathrin Hirschmüller (2009). Internationales Verbot des Humanklonens: Die Verhandlungen in der Uno. P. Lang.score: 762.0
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  10. Carmen Requejo Conde (2008). Protección Penal de la Vida Humana: Especial Consideración de la Eutanasia Neonatal. Editorial Comares.score: 762.0
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  11. Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) (2003). Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research: Readings and Commentary. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 741.6
    All investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health are now required to receive training about the ethics of clinical research. Based on a course taught by the editors at NIH, Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research is the first book designed to help investigators meet this new requirement. The book begins with the history of human subjects research and guidelines instituted since World War II. It then covers various stages and components of the clinical trial (...)
     
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  12. Mary Midgley (1994/1996). The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom, and Morality. Routledge.score: 681.6
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and (...)
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  13. Ronald M. Green (2010). Political Interventions in U.S. Human Embryo Research: An Ethical Assessment. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):220-228.score: 680.8
    For more than 30 years, beginning with the Reagan administration's refusal to support and provide oversight for embryo research, and continuing to the present in congressionally imposed limits on funding for such research, progress in infertility medicine and the development of stem cell therapies has been seriously delayed by a series of political interventions. In almost all cases, these interventions result from a view of the moral status of human embryo premised largely on religious assumptions. Although (...)
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  14. Mark Brown (2013). No Ethical Bypass of Moral Status in Stem Cell Research. Bioethics 27 (1):12-19.score: 667.2
    Recent advances in reprogramming technology do not bypass the ethical challenge of embryo sacrifice. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) research has been and almost certainly will continue to be conducted within the context of embryo sacrifice. If human embryos have moral status as human beings, then participation in iPS research renders one morally complicit in their destruction; if human embryos have moral status as mere precursors of human beings, then advocacy of (...)
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  15. Vasil Gluchman (2013). Pious Aspects in the Ethical and Moral Views of Matthias Bel. History of European Ideas 39 (6):776-790.score: 648.0
    Summary The author of the paper studies the ethical views of Matthias Bel expressed in his Preface to Johann Arndt's treatise and in Davidian-Solomonian Ethics, which contain a critique of false Christianity and ancient (especially Aristotle's) ethics. Bel refuses any philosophical ethics based on human nature, since man, in his very essence, is sinful and vicious. This leads to the general moral downfall of the young and mankind. He only recognises ethics whose source and the highest good (...)
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  16. Walter Glannon (2001). Genes and Future People: Philosophical Issues in Human Genetics. Westview Press.score: 643.4
    Advances in genetic technology in general and medical genetics in particular will enable us to intervene in the process of human biological development which extends from zygotes and embryos to people. This will allow us to control to a great extent the identities and the length and quality of the lives of people who already exist, as well as those we bring into existence in the near and distant future. Genes and Future People explores two general philosophical questions, one (...)
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  17. Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 637.6
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous research participant may have significant bearing (...)
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  18. Katrien Devolder & John Harris (2007). The Ambiguity of the Embryo: Ethical Inconsistency in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):153–169.score: 636.0
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  19. Christine Chwaszcza (2007). Moral Responsibility and Global Justice: A Human Rights Approach. Nomos.score: 633.6
  20. Gregor Damschen & Dieter Schönecker (2006). Saving Seven Embryos or Saving One Child? Michael Sandel on the Moral Status of Human Embryos. Journal of Philosophical Research (Ethics and the Life Sciences):239-245.score: 624.8
    Suppose a fire broke out in a fertility clinic. One had time to save either a young girl, or a tray of ten human embryos. Would it be wrong to save the girl? According to Michael Sandel, the moral intuition is to save the girl; what is more, one ought to do so, and this demonstrates that human embryos do not possess full personhood, and hence deserve only limited respect and may be killed for medical research. We (...)
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  21. Heidi Mertes & Guido Pennings (2010). Ethical Aspects of the Use of Stem Cell Derived Gametes for Reproduction. Health Care Analysis 18 (3):267-278.score: 576.0
    A lot of interest has been generated by the possibility of deriving gametes from embryonic stem cells and bone marrow stem cells. These stem cell derived gametes may become useful for research and for the treatment of infertility. In this article we consider prospectively the ethical issues that will arise if stem cell derived gametes are used in the clinic, making a distinction between concerns that only apply to embryonic stem cell derived gametes and concerns that are also relevant (...)
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  22. Leon Kass (1998). The Ethics of Human Cloning. Aei Press.score: 561.6
    Wilson and Kass talked about their book, The ethics of human cloning, which is about the ethical debate over human cloning.
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  23. Paul M. McNeill (1993). The Ethics and Politics of Human Experimentation. Cambridge University Press.score: 561.6
    This book focuses on experimentation that is carried out on human beings, including medical research, drug research and research undertaken in the social sciences. It discusses the ethics of such experimentation and asks the question: who defends the interests of these human subjects and ensures that they are not harmed? The author finds that ethical research depends on the adequacy of review by committee. Indeed most countries now rely on research ethics committees for the protection of the (...)
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  24. Daniel E. Lee (2010). Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization. Cambridge University Press.score: 561.6
    Machine generated contents note: Prologue; Part I. Philosophical Foundations: 1. Defining human rights in a coherent manner; 2. Near neighbors, distant neighbors and the ethics of globalization; 3. Ethical guidelines for business in an age of globalization; Part II. Practical Applications: 4. Human rights and the ethics of investment in China; 5. Liberia and Firestone: a case study; 6. Free trade, fair trade, and coffee farmers in Ethiopia; 7. Maquiladoras: exploitation, economic opportunity or both?; Part III. The (...)
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  25. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 561.6
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human (...)
     
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  26. Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.score: 525.6
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
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  27. Michael S. Northcott (2007). A Moral Climate: The Ethics of Global Warming. Orbis Books.score: 525.6
    Message from the planet -- When prophecy fails -- Energy and empire -- Climate economics -- Ethical emissions -- Dwelling in the light -- Mobility and pilgrimage -- Faithful feasting -- Remembering in time.
     
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  28. Erica Haimes & Ken Taylor (2011). The Contributions of Empirical Evidence to Socio-Ethical Debates on Fresh Embryo Donation for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Bioethics 25 (6):334-341.score: 522.0
    This article is a response to McLeod and Baylis (2007) who speculate on the dangers of requesting fresh ‘spare’ embryos from IVF patients for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, particularly when those embryos are good enough to be transferred back to the woman. They argue that these embryos should be frozen instead. We explore what is meant by ‘spare’ embryos. We then provide empirical evidence, from a study of embryo donation and of embryo donors' views, to (...)
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  29. Dennis John Mazur (2007). Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans: A Guide for Irb Members. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 521.6
    Biomedical research on humans is an important part of medical progress. But, when lives are at risk, safety and ethical practices need to be the top priority. The need for the committees that regulate and oversee such research -- institutional review boards, or IRBs -- is growing. IRB members face difficult decisions every day. Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans is a guide for new and veteran members of IRBs that will help them better understand the (...)
     
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  30. Samuel Mejías Valbuena (2005). Philosophical, Scientist, Moral, Ethics and Religious Analysis in the Juridical Compared Science in the Law of Cloning. S. Mejías Valbuena.score: 521.6
     
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  31. Andrés Ollero (ed.) (2007). Human Rights and Ethics: Proceedings of the 22nd Ivr World Congress, Granada 2005, Volume Iii = Derechos Humanos y Ética. [REVIEW] Franz Steiner Verlag.score: 521.6
     
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  32. Sheldon Ekland-Olson (2013). Life and Death Decisions: The Quest for Morality and Justice in Human Societies. Routledge.score: 517.6
    Based on the author's award-winning and hugely popular undergraduate course at the University of Texas, this book explores these questions and the fundamentally sociological processes which underlie the quest for morality and justice in ...
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  33. Fuat S. Oduncu (2003). Stem Cell Research in Germany: Ethics of Healing Vs. Human Dignity. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):5-16.score: 511.2
    On 25 April 2002, the German Parliament has passed a strict new law referring to stem cell research. This law took effect on July 1, 2002. The so-called embryonic Stem Cell Act ( Stammzellgesetz — StZG ) permits the import of embryonic stem (ES) cells isolated from surplus IvF-embryos for research reasons. The production itself of ES cells from human blastocysts has been prohibited by the German Embryo Protection Act of 1990, with the exception of the use of (...)
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  34. Iva Smit, Wendell Wallach & G. E. Lasker (eds.) (2005). Cognitive, Emotive, and Ethical Aspects of Decision Making in Humans and in Ai. International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics.score: 508.0
  35. William P. Cheshire (2004). Human Embryo Research and the Language of Moral Uncertainty. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):1 – 5.score: 507.6
    In bioethics as in the sciences, enormous discussions often concern the very small. Central to public debate over emerging reproductive and regenerative biotechnologies is the question of the moral status of the human embryo. Because news media have played a prominent role in framing the vocabulary of the debate, this study surveyed the use of language reporting on human embryo research in news articles spanning a two-year period. Terminology that devalued moral status - for (...)
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  36. Marc Ramsay (2011). Twinning and Fusion as Arguments Against the Moral Standing of the Early Human Embryo. Utilitas 23 (2):183-205.score: 507.6
    Some philosophers argue that, because it is subject to twinning and fusion, the early human embryo cannot hold strong moral standing. Supposedly, the fact that an early human embryo can twin or fuse with another embryo entails that it is not a distinct individual, thus precluding it from holding any level of moral standing. I argue that appeals to twinning and fusion fail to show that the early human embryo is not (...)
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  37. Beatrice Ioan & Vasile Astarastoae (2013). Ethical and Legal Aspects in Medically Assisted Human Reproduction in Romania. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 14 (2):4 - 13.score: 505.2
    Up to the present, there have not been any specific norms regarding medically assisted human reproduction in Romanian legislation. Due to this situation the general legislation regarding medical assistance (law no. 95/2006, regarding the Reform in Health Care System), the Penal and Civil law and the provisions of the Code of Deontology of the Romanian College of Physicians are applied to the field of medically assisted human reproduction. By analysing the ethical and legal conflicts regarding medically assisted (...)
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  38. W. J. Talbott (2010). Human Rights and Human Well-Being. Oxford University Press.score: 501.6
    The consequentialist project for human rights -- Exceptions to libertarian natural rights -- The main principle -- What is well-being? What is equity? -- The two deepest mysteries in moral philosophy -- Security rights -- Epistemological foundations for the priority of autonomy rights -- The millian epistemological argument for autonomy rights -- Property rights, contract rights, and other economic rights -- Democratic rights -- Equity rights -- The most reliable judgment standard for weak paternalism -- Liberty rights and (...)
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  39. Scott Veitch (2007). Law and Irresponsibility: On the Legitimation of Human Suffering. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 501.6
    It is commonly understood that in its focus on rights and obligations law is centrally concerned with organising responsibility. In defining how obligations are created, in contract or property law, say, or imposed, as in tort, public, or criminal law, law and legal institutions are usually seen as society’s key mode of asserting and defining the content and scope of responsibilities. This book takes the converse view: legal institutions are centrally involved in organising irresponsibility. Particularly with respect to the production (...)
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  40. Toni Samek (2007). Librarianship and Human Rights: A Twenty-First Century Guide. Chandos.score: 501.6
    Forward - Prefacio - Acknowledgments - Preface - About the author - Part One: the rhetoric - An urgent context for twenty-first century librarianship - Human rights, contestations and moral responsibilities of library and information workers - Part Two: the reality - Practical strategies for social action - Prevalent manifestations of social action applied to library and information work - Specific forms of social action used in library and information work for social change - Closing thought.
     
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  41. Dale Jamieson (2002). Morality's Progress: Essays on Humans, Other Animals, and the Rest of Nature. Oxford University Press.score: 497.6
    The twenty-two papers here are invigoratingly diverse, but together tell a unified story about various aspects of the morality of our relationships to animals and to nature.
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  42. Matthew H. Haber & Bryan Benham (2012). Reframing the Ethical Issues in Part-Human Animal Research: The Unbearable Ontology of Inexorable Moral Confusion. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):17-25.score: 486.0
    Research that involves the creation of animals with human-derived parts opens the door to potentially valuable scientific and therapeutic advances, yet invokes unsettling moral questions. Critics and champions alike stand to gain from clear identification and careful consideration of the strongest ethical objections to this research. A prevailing objection argues that crossing the human/nonhuman species boundary introduces inexorable moral confusion (IMC) that warrants a restriction to this research on precautionary grounds. Though this objection may capture (...)
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  43. Rosalind Hursthouse (2000). Ethics, Humans, and Other Animals: An Introduction with Readings. Routledge.score: 485.6
    Rosalind Hursthouse carefully introduces one of three standard approaches in current ethical theory: utilitarianism, rights, and virtue ethics. She then proceeds to clearly explain how each approach encourages us to think about our treatment of animals. Every chapter is linked to a reading from a key exponent of each approach. With readings from Singer, Regan and Midgley.
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  44. Silke Schicktanz (2006). Ethical Considerations of the Human–Animal-Relationship Under Conditions of Asymmetry and Ambivalence. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):7-16.score: 484.0
    Ethical reflection deals not only with the moral standing and handling of animals, it should also include a critical analysis of the underlying relationship. Anthropological, psychological, and sociological aspects of the human–animal-relationship should be taken into account. Two conditions, asymmetry and ambivalence, are taken as the historical and empirical basis for reflections on the human–animal-relationship in late modern societies. These conditions explain the variety of moral practice, apart from paradoxes, and provide a framework to (...)
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  45. Tomasz Żuradzki (forthcoming). Moral Uncertainty in Bioethical Argumentation: A New Understanding of the Pro-Life View on Early Human Embryos. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-17.score: 482.4
    In this article, I present a new interpretation of the pro-life view on the status of early human embryos. In my understanding, this position is based not on presumptions about the ontological status of embryos and their developmental capabilities but on the specific criteria of rational decisions under uncertainty and on a cautious response to the ambiguous status of embryos. This view, which uses the decision theory model of moral reasoning, promises to reconcile the uncertainty about the ontological (...)
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  46. Robert Audi (2007). Moral Value and Human Diversity. Oxford University Press.score: 477.6
    This short and accessible book is designed for those learning about the search for ethical rules that can apply despite cultural differences. Robert Audi looks at several such attempts: Aristotle, Kant; Mill; and the movement known as "common-sense" ethics associated with W.D. Ross. He shows how each attempt grew out of its own time and place, yet has some universal qualities that can be used for an ethical framework. This is a short, accessible treatment of a major topic (...)
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  47. Sam Harris (2011). Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. Free Press.score: 477.6
    The moral landscape -- Moral truth -- Good and evil -- Belief -- Religion -- The future of happiness -- Afterword.
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  48. Sam Harris (2010). The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. Free Press.score: 477.6
    Bestselling author Sam Harris dismantles the most common justification for religious faith-that a moral system cannot be based on science.
     
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  49. Arlene Judith Klotzko (2004). A Clone of Your Own?: The Science and Ethics of Cloning. Oxford University Press.score: 477.0
    Someday soon (if it hasn't happened in secret already), a human will be cloned, and mankind will embark on a scientific and moral journey whose destination cannot be foretold. In Copycats: The Science and Ethics of Cloning, Arlene Judith Klotzko describes the new world of possibilities that can be glimpsed over the horizon. In a lucid and engaging narrative, she explains that the technology to create clones of living beings already exists, inaugurated in 1996 by Dolly the sheep, (...)
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  50. G. R. Dunstan (1984). The Moral Status of the Human Embryo: A Tradition Recalled. Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (1):38-44.score: 474.0
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