Search results for 'Human embryonic stem cells' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    Roman J. Krawetz, Xiangyun Li & Derrick E. Rancourt (2009). Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Caught Between a ROCK Inhibitor and a Hard Place. Bioessays 31 (3):336-343.
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  2.  13
    Frederic Bretzner, Frederic Gilbert, Françoise Baylis & Robert M. Brownstone (2011). Target Populations for First-In-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Stem Cell 8 (5):468-475.
    Geron recently announced that it had begun enrolling patients in the world's first-in-human clinical trial involving cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This trial raises important questions regarding the future of hESC-based therapies, especially in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We address some safety and efficacy concerns with this research, as well as the ethics of fair subject selection. We consider other populations that might be better for this research: chronic complete SCI (...)
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  3.  27
    Demetrio Neri (2011). The Race Toward 'Ethically Universally Acceptable' Human Pluripotent (Embryonic-Like) Stem Cells: Only a Problem of Sources? Bioethics 25 (5):260-266.
    Over the past few years, several proposals aimed at procuring human pluripotent (embryonic-like) stem cells without involving the destruction of a human embryo have been proposed and widely discussed. This article focuses on a basic aspect of the debate, namely the plausibility of one or more of these new proposals being able to meet the ethical requirements that those who regard the human embryo as sacred have tried to impose on stem cells (...)
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  4.  6
    J. R. Meyer (2000). Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Respect for Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):166-170.
    The purpose of this essay is to stimulate academic discussion about the ethical justification of using human primordial stem cells for tissue transplantation, cell replacement, and gene therapy. There are intriguing alternatives to using embryos obtained from elective abortions and in vitro fertilisation to reconstitute damaged or dysfunctional human organs. These include the expansion and transplantation of latent adult progenitor cells.
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  5.  7
    Geron Ethics Advisory Board (forthcoming). Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Ethical Considerations. Hastings Center Report.
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  6.  92
    Karen Lebacqz, Michael M. Mendiola, Ted Peters, Ernlé W. D. Young & Laurie Zoloth‐Dorfman (1999). Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Ethical Considerations. Hastings Center Report 29 (2):31-36.
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  7. Audrey R. Chapman (2009). The Ethics of Patenting Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (3):pp. 261-288.
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  8.  1
    G. Badura-Lotter (2001). Ethical, Biological and Legal Aspects in the Use of Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Germany. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 7 (2):38.
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  9. Michel Revel (2010). Research on Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Cloning for Stem Cells. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 14 (1):4-14.
     
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  10.  22
    William B. Hurlbut (2005). Altered Nuclear Transfer as a Morally Acceptable Means for the Procurement of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (2):211-228.
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  11.  1
    Melinda Bonnie Fagan (forthcoming). Generative Models: Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Multiple Modeling Relations. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
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  12.  2
    M. M. Mendiola, T. Peters, E. W. Young & L. Zoloth-Dorfman (1999). Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Ethical Considerations. By Geron Ethics Advisory Board. Hastings Center Report 29 (2):31.
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  13. William B. Hurlbut (2005). Altered Nuclear Transfer as a Morally Acceptable Means for the Procurement of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 5 (1):145-151.
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  14. Christine Mummery (2007). Cardiomyocytes From Human Embryonic Stem Cells: More Than Heart Repair Alone. Bioessays 29 (6):572-579.
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  15.  18
    David B. Resnik (2002). The Commercialization of Human Stem Cells: Ethical and Policy Issues. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 10 (2):127-154.
    The first stage of the human embryonic stem(ES) cell research debate revolved aroundfundamental questions, such as whether theresearch should be done at all, what types ofresearch may be done, who should do theresearch, and how the research should befunded. Now that some of these questions arebeing answered, we are beginning to see thenext stage of the debate: the battle forproperty rights relating to human ES cells. The reason why property rights will be a keyissue in (...)
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  16.  13
    David B. Resnik (2007). Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity. Health Care Analysis 15 (3):211-222.
    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells (...)
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  17.  4
    Maureen L. Condic & Edward J. Furton (2007). Harvesting Embryonic Stem Cells From Deceased Human Embryos. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (3):507-526.
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  18.  10
    Yves Maury, Morgane Gauthier, Marc Peschanski & Cécile Martinat (2012). Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modelling and Drug Screening. Bioessays 34 (1):61-71.
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  19.  11
    Divya Rajamohan, Elena Matsa, Spandan Kalra, James Crutchley, Asha Patel, Vinoj George & Chris Denning (2013). Current Status of Drug Screening and Disease Modelling in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells. Bioessays 35 (3):281-298.
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  20.  16
    Ronald K. F. Fung & Ian H. Kerridge (2013). Uncertain Translation, Uncertain Benefit and Uncertain Risk: Ethical Challenges Facing First-in-Human Trials of Induced Pluripotent Stem (Ips) Cells. Bioethics 27 (2):89-96.
    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in 2006 was heralded as a major breakthrough in stem cell research. Since then, progress in iPS cell technology has paved the way towards clinical application, particularly cell replacement therapy, which has refueled debate on the ethics of stem cell research. However, much of the discourse has focused on questions of moral status and potentiality, overlooking the ethical issues which are introduced by the clinical testing of iPS cell (...)
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  21.  45
    Audrey R. Chapman & Courtney C. Scala (2012). Evaluating the First-in-Human Clinical Trial of a Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Based Therapy. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (3):243-261.
    The transition of novel and potentially promising medical therapies into their initial human clinical trials can engender conflicting pressures. On the one side, because Phase I trials raise greater ethical and human protection challenges than later stage clinical trials, there is a need to proceed cautiously. This is particularly the case for Phase I trials with a novel therapy being tested in humans for the first time, usually termed first-in-human (FIH) trials, especially if the FIH trial involves (...)
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  22.  29
    Erica Haimes & Ken Taylor (2011). The Contributions of Empirical Evidence to Socio-Ethical Debates on Fresh Embryo Donation for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Bioethics 25 (6):334-341.
    This article is a response to McLeod and Baylis (2007) who speculate on the dangers of requesting fresh ‘spare’ embryos from IVF patients for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, particularly when those embryos are good enough to be transferred back to the woman. They argue that these embryos should be frozen instead. We explore what is meant by ‘spare’ embryos. We then provide empirical evidence, from a study of embryo donation and of embryo donors' views, to (...)
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  23.  11
    Godfrey B. Tangwa (2007). Moral Status of Embryonic Stem Cells: Perspective of an African Villager. Bioethics 21 (8):449–457.
  24. Mark Moller (2009). Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research and the Discarded Embryo Argument. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):131-145.
    Many who believe that human embryos have moral status are convinced that their use in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research can be morally justified as long as they are discarded embryos left over from fertility treatments. This is one reason why this view about discarded embryos has played such a prominent role in the debate over publicly funding hESC research in the United States and other countries. Many believe that this view offers the best chance (...)
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  25.  25
    Søren Holm (2006). Who Should Control the Use of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines: A Defence of the Donors' Ability to Control. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):55-68.
    In this paper I analyse who should be able to control the use of human embryonic stem cell lines. I distinguish between different kinds of control and analyse a set of arguments that purport to show that the donors of gametes and embryos should not be able to control the use of stem cell lines derived from their embryos. I show these arguments to be either deficient or of so general a scope that they apply not (...)
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  26.  27
    Matthew Herder (2006). Proliferating Patent Problems with Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):69-79.
    The scientific challenges and ethical controversies facing human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research continue to command attention. The issues posed by patenting hESC technologies have, however, largely failed to penetrate the discourse, much less result in political action. This paper examines U.S. and European patent systems, illustrating discrepancies in the patentability of hESC technologies and identifying potential negative consequences associated with efforts to make available hESC research tools for basic research purposes while at same time strengthening the (...)
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  27.  68
    S. Matthew Liao (2005). Rescuing Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: The Blastocyst Transfer Method. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):8 – 16.
    Despite the therapeutic potential of human embryonic stem (HES) cells, many people believe that HES cell research should be banned. The reason is that the present method of extracting HES cells involves the destruction of the embryo, which for many is the beginning of a person. This paper examines a number of compromise solutions such as parthenogenesis, the use of defective embryos, genetically creating a "pseudo embryo" that can never form a placenta, and determining embryo (...)
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  28. Philip J. Nickel (2008). Ethical Issues in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. In Kristen Renwick Monroe, Ronald B. Miller & Jerome Tobis (eds.), Fundamentals of the Stem Cell Debate: The Scientific, Religious, Ethical & Political Issues. University of California Press
    As a moral philosopher, the perspective I will take in this chapter is one of argumentation and informed judgment about two main questions: whether individuals should ever choose to conduct human embryonic stem cell research, and whether the law should permit this type of research. I will also touch upon a secondary question, that of whether the government ought to pay for this type of research. I will discuss some of the main arguments at stake, and explain (...)
     
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  29.  67
    LeRoy Walters (2004). Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: An Intercultural Perspective. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):3-38.
    : In 1998, researchers discovered that embryonic stem cells could be derived from early human embryos. This discovery has raised a series of ethical and public-policy questions that are now being confronted by multiple international organizations, nations, cultures, and religious traditions. This essay surveys policies for human embryonic stem cell research in four regions of the world, reports on the recent debate at the United Nations about one type of such research, and reviews (...)
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  30.  3
    Suzanne Holland, Karen Lebacqz & Laurie Zoloth (eds.) (2001). The Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy. The MIT Press.
    Discusses the ethical issues involved in the use of human embryonic stem cells in regenerative medicine.
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  31.  53
    Robert Streiffer (2005). At the Edge of Humanity: Human Stem Cells, Chimeras, and Moral Status. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):347-370.
    : Experiments involving the transplantation of human stem cells and their derivatives into early fetal or embryonic nonhuman animals raise novel ethical issues due to their possible implications for enhancing the moral status of the chimeric individual. Although status-enhancing research is not necessarily objectionable from the perspective of the chimeric individual, there are grounds for objecting to it in the conditions in which it is likely to occur. Translating this ethical conclusion into a policy recommendation, however, (...)
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  32.  6
    H.-W. Denker (2006). Potentiality of Embryonic Stem Cells: An Ethical Problem Even with Alternative Stem Cell Sources. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (11):665-671.
    The recent discussions about alternative sources of human embryonic stem cells , while stirring new interest in the developmental potential of the various abnormal embryos or constructs proposed as such sources, also raise questions about the potential of the derived embryonic stem cells. The data on the developmental potential of embryonic stem cells that seem relevant for ethical considerations and aspects of patentability are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the (...)
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  33.  8
    Andrew W. Siegel (2015). Gamete Donor Consent and Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (2):149-168.
    There is wide agreement that the derivation and use of human embryonic stem cells from embryos remaining after infertility treatment morally require the informed consent of the IVF patients who undertook the treatment. However, there continues to be controversy over whether hESC research involving leftover embryos created with eggs or sperm from third-party donors requires the consent of these donors. In the United States, the lack of consensus on this issue manifests itself in a conflict between (...)
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  34.  22
    Laurie Zoloth (2002). Reasonable Magic and the Nature of Alchemy: Jewish Reflections on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (1):65-93.
    : The controversy about research on human embryonic stem cells both divides and defines us, raising fundamental ethical and religious questions about the nature of the self and the limits of science. This article uses Jewish sources to articulate fundamental concerns about the forbiddenness of knowledge in general and of knowledge thought of as magical creation. Alchemy, and the turning of elements into gold and into substances for longevity, and magic used for the creation of living (...)
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  35.  21
    Jan P. Beckmann (2004). On the German Debate on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (5):603 – 621.
    Germany since 1990 has one of the strictest human embryo protection laws, yet according to the Stem Cell Act of 2002 allows, under strict conditions, the import and use of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) for high priority research goals. The author tries to show how this is taken to be coherent by the parliamentary majority (though not necessarily by the general public) in Germany. In doing so, he firstly looks into the chronicle of (...)
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  36.  1
    Hans-Werner Denker (2006). Potentiality of Embryonic Stem Cells: An Ethical Problem Even with Alternative Stem Cell Sources. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (11):665-671.
    The recent discussions about alternative sources of human embryonic stem cells , while stirring new interest in the developmental potential of the various abnormal embryos or constructs proposed as such sources, also raise questions about the potential of the derived embryonic stem cells. The data on the developmental potential of embryonic stem cells that seem relevant for ethical considerations and aspects of patentability are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the (...)
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  37.  18
    Bishop Thomas (2013). Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Its Importance in the Culture Wars. Christian Bioethics 19 (1):60-71.
    The debate surrounding human embryonic stem cell research plays a crucial role in the culture wars. Those who embrace post-traditional morality not only see no ethical problem with the destruction of human embryos for research and therapies, but press for their use despite the greater potential for risk from the totipotent cells that are harvested from the destruction of human embryos as opposed to other kinds of stem cells. Indeed, there have been (...)
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  38.  29
    Bertha Manninen (2008). Are Human Embryos Kantian Persons?: Kantian Considerations in Favor of Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):4.
    One argument used by detractors of human embryonic stem cell research (hESCR) invokes Kant's formula of humanity, which proscribes treating persons solely as a means to an end, rather than as ends in themselves. According to Fuat S. Oduncu, for example, adhering to this imperative entails that human embryos should not be disaggregated to obtain pluripotent stem cells for hESCR. Given that human embryos are Kantian persons from the time of their conception, killing (...)
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  39.  10
    Nicolae Ovidiu Grad, Ionel Ciprian Pop & Ion Aurel Mironiuc (2012). Stem Cells Therapy and Research. Benefits and Ethical Challences. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (32):190-205.
    The research on stem cell-based therapies has greatly expanded in recent years. Our text attempts to seek those religious and ethical challenges that stem cell therapy and research bring into debate. Our thesis is that bioethics can defend its principle without a religious background. We will develop our argumentation on three major points: firstly, a comparison between secular ethics and religious views will clarify why stem cell therapy and research are important from a scientific point of view, (...)
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  40.  3
    Brooke Ellison & Jaymie Meliker (2011). Assessing the Risk of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome in Egg Donation: Implications for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (9):22-30.
    Stem cell research has important implications for medicine. The source of stem cells influences their therapeutic potential, with stem cells derived from early-stage embryos remaining the most versatile. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), a source of embryonic stem cells, allows for understandings about disease development and, more importantly, the ability to yield embryonic stem cell lines that are genetically matched to the somatic cell donor. However, SCNT requires women to donate (...)
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  41. Don Marquis (2007). The Moral-Principle Objection to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):190–206.
    Opponents of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research claim that such research is incompatible with the moral principle that it is always wrong intentionally to end a human life. In this essay, I discuss how that principle might be revised so that it is subject to as few difficulties as possible. I then argue that even the most defensible version of the principle is compatible with the moral permissibility of hESC research.
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  42.  26
    Patrick L. Taylor (2005). The Gap Between Law and Ethics in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Overcoming the Effect of U.S. Federal Policy on Research Advances and Public Benefit. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):589-616.
    Key ethical issues arise in association with the conduct of stem cell research by research institutions in the United States. These ethical issues, summarized in detail, receive no adequate translation into federal laws or regulations, also described in this article. U.S. Federal policy takes a passive approach to these ethical issues, translating them simply into limitations on taxpayer funding, and foregoes scientific and ethical leadership while protecting intellectual property interests through a laissez faire approach to stem cell patents (...)
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  43.  26
    A. -K. M. Andersson (2011). Embryonic Stem Cells and Property Rights. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (3):221-242.
    This article contributes to the current debate on human embryonic stem cell researchers’ possible complicity in the destruction of human embryos and the relevance of such complicity for the issue of commodification of human embryos. I will discuss if, and to what extent, researchers who destroy human embryos, and researchers who merely use human embryos destroyed by others, have moral use rights, and/or moral property rights, in these embryos. I argue that the moral (...)
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  44.  54
    Françoise Baylis (2009). For Love or Money? The Saga of Korean Women Who Provided Eggs for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):385-396.
    In 2004 and 2005, Woo-Suk Hwang achieved international stardom with publications in Science reporting on successful research involving the creation of stem cells from cloned human embryos. The wonder and success all began to unravel, however, when serious ethical concerns were raised about the source of the eggs for this research. When the egg scandal had completely unfolded, it turned out that many of the women who provided eggs for stem cell research had not provided valid (...)
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  45.  31
    Mi-Kyung Kim (2009). Oversight Framework Over Oocyte Procurement for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Comparative Analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk Case Under South Korean Bioethics Law and U.S. Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):367-384.
    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang’s potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under (...)
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  46.  47
    P. S. Copland (2004). The Roman Catholic Church and Embryonic Stem Cells. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):607-608.
    Skene and Parker1 raise a number of concerns about religious doctrine unduly influencing law and public policy through amicus curiae contributions to civil litigations or direct lobbying of politicians. Oakley2 picks this up in the same issue with an emphasis on the Roman Catholic Church’s interest in preventing the destruction of embryos for embryonic stem cell research. Skene, Parker, and Oakley seem to be concerned mostly with religious views having undue influence on public policy. My concern is the (...)
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  47.  9
    Yue Liang Zheng (forthcoming). Some Ethical Concerns About Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-8.
    Human induced pluripotent stem cells can be obtained from somatic cells, and their derivation does not require destruction of embryos, thus avoiding ethical problems arising from the destruction of human embryos. This type of stem cell may provide an important tool for stem cell therapy, but it also results in some ethical concerns. It is likely that abnormal reprogramming occurs in the induction of human induced pluripotent stem cells, and that (...)
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  48.  29
    Lawrence Burns (2009). “You Are Our Only Hope”: Trading Metaphorical “Magic Bullets” for Stem Cell “Superheroes”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6):427-442.
    In the wake of two recent developments in stem cell research, it is a fitting time to reassess the claim that stem cells will radically transform the concept and function of medicine. The first is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s decision in January 2009 to approve Geron Corporation’s Phase I clinical trial using human embryonic stem cells for patients with spinal cord injuries. The second is the National Institutes of Health’s decision to (...)
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  49.  9
    Patrick Foong (2011). Human Embryonic Stem Cell (HESC) Research in Malaysia: Multi-Faith Perspectives. Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):182-206.
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  50.  1
    Dong‐Bo Ou, Hong‐Juan Lang, Rui Chen, Xiong‐Tao Liu & Qiang‐Sun Zheng (2009). Using Embryonic Stem Cells to Form a Biological Pacemaker Via Tissue Engineering Technology. Bioessays 31 (2):246-252.
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