Search results for 'Human evolution' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Leonid Perlovsky (2013). A Challenge to Human Evolution—Cognitive Dissonance. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    A challenge to human evolution—cognitive dissonance.
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  2. Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
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  3. Timothy Clack (2009). Ancestral Roots: Modern Living and Human Evolution. Macmillan.score: 240.0
    Human evolution explains how we have found ourselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Issues of modern living; depression, obesity, and environmental destruction, can be understood in relation to our evolutionary past. This book shows how an awareness of this past and its relation to the present can help limit their impact on the future.
     
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  4. Michael Ruse (2012). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements; 1. Evolutionary biology; 2. Human evolution; 3. Real science, good science?; 4. Progress; 5. Knowledge; 6. Morality; 7. Sex, orientation, and race; 8. From eugenics to medicine; Bibliography.
     
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  5. P. Slurink, Culture and the Evolution of the Human Mating System.score: 210.0
    Contrary to chimpanzees and bonobos, humans display long-term exclusive relationships between males and females. Probably all human cultures have some kind of marriage system, apparently designed to protect these exclusive relationships and the resulting offspring in a potentially sexual competitive environment. Different hypotheses about the origin of human pair-bonds are compared and it is shown how they may refer to different phases of human evolution.
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  6. P. Rajagopalachari (1994). Role of the Master in Human Evolution: Proceedings of the Sahaj Marg Seminars, Held at Vorauf-Munich, Paris and Marseilles From June 28 to July 13, 1986. [REVIEW] Shri Ram Chandra Mission.score: 210.0
     
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  7. Anthony O'Hear (1997). Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation. Oxford University Press.score: 204.0
    In this controversial new book O'Hear takes a stand against the fashion for explaining human behavior in terms of evolution. He contends that while the theory of evolution is successful in explaining the development of the natural world in general, it is of limited value when applied to the human world. Because of our reflectiveness and our rationality we take on goals and ideals which cannot be justified in terms of survival-promotion or reproductive advantage. O'Hear examines (...)
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  8. Terrence Twomey (2014). How Domesticating Fire Facilitated the Evolution of Human Cooperation. Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):89-99.score: 204.0
    Controlled fire use by early humans could have facilitated the evolution of human cooperation. Individuals with regular access to the benefits of domestic fire would have been at an advantage over those with limited or no access. However, a campfire would have been relatively costly for an individual to maintain and open to free riders. By cooperating, individuals could have reduced maintenance costs, minimized free riding and lessened the risk of being without fire. Cooperators were more likely to (...)
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  9. Russell Powell, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2012). Evolution, Genetic Engineering, and Human Enhancement. Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):439-458.score: 198.0
    There are many ways that biological theory can inform ethical discussions of genetic engineering and biomedical enhancement. In this essay, we highlight some of these potential contributions, and along the way provide a synthetic overview of the papers that comprise this special issue. We begin by comparing and contrasting genetic engineering with programs of selective breeding that led to the domestication of plants and animals, and we consider how genetic engineering differs from other contemporary biotechnologies such as embryo selection. We (...)
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  10. Antonello La Vergata (2009). Debates on Human Evolution Between the 19th and the 20th Centuries. Rivista di Filosofia 2 (2):237-262.score: 198.0
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  11. Alisa Clarke (2012). The Potential of the Human Rights-Based Approach for the Evolution of the United Nations as a System. Human Rights Review 13 (2):225-248.score: 198.0
    The United Nations (UN), facing increasingly intense challenges in the fulfillment of its mission, also harbors the potential for enhanced effectiveness, relevance, and legitimacy in the form of the human rights-based approach. The human rights-based approach (HRBA) is one model for translating the organization’s values into a more adaptive, inclusive, dynamic, and responsive system of processes and outcomes. In the arena of politics, its meeting with a meaningful degree of receptiveness could signal a growing acceptance of the validity (...)
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  12. Vladimir G. Red'ko (2000). Evolution of Cognition: Towards the Theory of Origin of Human Logic. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 5 (3):323-338.score: 192.0
    The main problem discussed in this paper is: Why and how did animal cognition abilities arise? It is argued that investigations of the evolution of animal cognition abilities are very important from an epistemological point of view. A new direction for interdisciplinary researches – the creation and development of the theory of human logic origin – is proposed. The approaches to the origination of such a theory (mathematical models of ``intelligent invention'' of biological evolution, the cybernetic schemes (...)
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  13. Denise Dellarosa Cummins (1996). Dominance Hierarchies and the Evolution of Human Reasoning. Minds and Machines 6 (4):463-480.score: 192.0
    Research from ethology and evolutionary biology indicates the following about the evolution of reasoning capacity. First, solving problems of social competition and cooperation have direct impact on survival rates and reproductive success. Second, the social structure that evolved from this pressure is the dominance hierarchy. Third, primates that live in large groups with complex dominance hierarchies also show greater neocortical development, and concomitantly greater cognitive capacity. These facts suggest that the necessity of reasoning effectively about dominance hierarchies left an (...)
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  14. Grzegorz Bugajak & Jacek Tomczyk (2009). Human Origins: Continuous Evolution Versus Punctual Creation. In Pranab Das (ed.), Global Perspectives on Science and Spirituality. Templeton Press. 143–164.score: 192.0
    One of the particular problems in the debate between science and theology regarding human origins seems to be an apparent controversy between the continuous character of evolutionary processes leading to the origin of Homo sapiens and the punctual understanding of the act of creation of man seen as taking place in a moment in time. The paper elaborates scientific arguments for continuity or discontinuity of evolution, and what follows, for the existence or nonexistence of a clear borderline between (...)
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  15. Frank Kressing, Matthis Krischel & Heiner Fangerau (2014). The 'Global Phylogeny' and its Historical Legacy: A Critical Review of a Unified Theory of Human Biological and Linguistic Co-Evolution. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):15-27.score: 192.0
    In a critical review of late twentieth-century gene-culture co-evolutionary models labelled as ‘global phylogeny’, the authors present evidence for the long legacy of co-evolutionary theories in European-based thinking, highlighting that (1) ideas of social and cultural evolution preceded the idea of biological evolution, (2) linguistics played a dominant role in the formation of a unified theory of human co-evolution, and (3) that co-evolutionary thinking was only possible due to perpetuated and renewed transdisciplinary reticulations between scholars of (...)
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  16. Cameron Shelley (1999). Preadaptation and the Explanation of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):65-82.score: 192.0
    The concept of preadaptation, though useful, continues to trouble evolutionary scientists. Usually, it is treated as if it were really adaptation, prompting such diverse theorists as Gould and Vrba, and Dennett to suggest its removal from evolutionary theory altogether. In this paper, I argue that the as-if sense is ill-founded, and that the sense of preadaptation as a process may be defended as unequivocal and generally useful in evolutionary explanations, even in such problem areas as human evolution.
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  17. Branka Hrvoj-Mihic, Thibault Bienvenu, Lisa Stefanacci, Alysson R. Muotri & Katerina Semendeferi (2013). Evolution, Development, and Plasticity of the Human Brain: From Molecules to Bones. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 186.0
  18. Helen de Cruz & Johan de Smedt (2007). The Role of Intuitive Ontologies in Scientific Understanding – the Case of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):351-368.score: 180.0
    Psychological evidence suggests that laypeople understand the world around them in terms of intuitive ontologies which describe broad categories of objects in the world, such as ‘person’, ‘artefact’ and ‘animal’. However, because intuitive ontologies are the result of natural selection, they only need to be adaptive; this does not guarantee that the knowledge they provide is a genuine reflection of causal mechanisms in the world. As a result, science has parted ways with intuitive ontologies. Nevertheless, since the brain is evolved (...)
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  19. William Irons (2009). The Intertwined Roles of Genes and Culture in Human Evolution. Zygon 44 (2):347-354.score: 180.0
    This essay critiques dual-inheritance theory as presented in Peter Richerson and Robert Boyd's book Not by Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution (2005). The theory states that culture became prominent in human evolution because it allowed relatively rapid adaptation to changing environments by means of imitation. Imitating the behavior of other members of one's community produces adaptive behaviors more readily than either genetic evolution or individual learning. Imitation follows a number of patterns: imitating high-status (...)
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  20. Nick Bostrom, The Future of Human Evolution.score: 180.0
    Evolutionary development is sometimes thought of as exhibiting an inexorable trend towards higher, more complex, and normatively worthwhile forms of life. This paper explores some dystopian scenarios where freewheeling evolutionary developments, while continuing to produce complex and intelligent forms of organization, lead to the gradual elimination of all forms of being that we care about. We then consider how such catastrophic outcomes could be avoided and argue that under certain conditions the only possible remedy would be a globally coordinated policy (...)
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  21. Tomáš Hříbek (2011). Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution. Estetika 48 (2):248-253.score: 180.0
    A review of Denis Dutton´s The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2009, 280 pp. ISBN 978-1-59691-401-8).
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  22. Florian von Schilcher (1984). Philosophy, Evolution, and Human Nature. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 180.0
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  23. Riane Eisler (1997). Action Research and Human Evolution: David Loye's Lifelong Exploration of Moral Sensitivity. World Futures 49 (1):89-101.score: 180.0
    (1997). Action research and human evolution: David Loye's lifelong exploration of moral sensitivity. World Futures: Vol. 49, The Dialatic of Evolution: Essays in Honor of David Loye, pp. 89-101.
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  24. Russell Powell (2014). The Philosophy of Human Evolution: Contemporary Debates in Historical Context. Metascience 23 (2):285-291.score: 180.0
    What does human evolutionary theory reveal about the origins of human nature and the constraints it imposes on human cognition, behavior, and society? “The whole field of human evolution is pregnant with philosophical questions of great interest”, Michael Ruse concludes in the final passage of The Philosophy of Human Evolution. This engaging and eminently readable romp through the philosophical landscape of human evolution fills a significant niche in the existing literature. There (...)
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  25. Nicholas Maxwell (2001). The Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will and Evolution. Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.score: 174.0
    This book tackles the problem of how we can understand our human world embedded in the physical universe in such a way that justice is done both to the richness...
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  26. Don Ross (2012). What Can Economics Contribute to the Study of Human Evolution? Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):287-297.score: 174.0
    The revised edition of Paul Seabright’s The Company of Strangers is critically reviewed. Seabright aims to help non-economists participating in the cross-disciplinary study of the evolution of human sociality appreciate the potential value that can be added by economists. Though the book includes nicely constructed and vivid essays on a range of economic topics, in its main ambition it largely falls short. The most serious problem is endorsement of the so-called strong reciprocity hypothesis that has been promoted by (...)
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  27. Russell Powell (2012). The Future of Human Evolution. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (1):145-175.score: 174.0
    There is a tendency in both scientific and humanistic disciplines to think of biological evolution in humans as significantly impeded if not completely overwhelmed by the robust cultural and technological capabilities of the species. The aim of this article is to make sense of and evaluate this claim. In Section 2 , I flesh out the argument that humans are ‘insulated’ from ordinary evolutionary mechanisms in terms of our contemporary biological understandings of phenotypic plasticity, niche construction, and cultural transmission. (...)
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  28. Merlin Donald (2001). A Mind So Rare: The Evolution of Human Consciousness. W.W. Norton.score: 168.0
  29. Ernan McMullin (2013). Cosmic Purpose and the Contingency of Human Evolution. Zygon 48 (2):338-363.score: 168.0
    Some understand the evolutionary process as more or less predictable; others stress its contingency. I argue that both Christian evolutionists who have assumed that the purposes of the Creator can be realized only through more or less predictable processes as well as those who infer from the contingency of the evolutionary process to the lack of purpose in the universe generally, are mistaken if the Creator escapes from the limits imposed on the creature by temporality, as the traditional Augustinian account (...)
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  30. Mary Maxwell (1984). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Anthropology. Columbia University Press.score: 168.0
    ... Nosce te ipsum -Carolus Linnaeus We, however, want to become those we are — human beings who are new, unique, incomparable, who give themselves laws, ...
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  31. Natalia A. Abieva (2008). The Role of Off-Line Communication in Human Evolution. Biosemiotics 1 (3):295-311.score: 168.0
    The existence of embodied communication in humans places them among other living systems and helps to differentiate sign patterns that are common to all bioforms from those that are peculiarly human. Despite the fact that the biological roots of communication have been proven, the understanding of human forms of discourse is still far from being clarified. The main question remains: when and why did humans acquire the ability to exchange messages via speech? My thesis is that it became (...)
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  32. Anton Killin (2014). Musicality in Human Evolution, Archaeology and Ethnography. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):597-609.score: 168.0
    This essay reviews Iain Morley’s The Prehistory of Music, an up-to-date and authoritative overview of recent research on evolution and cognition of musicality from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. Given the diversity of the project explored, integration of evidence from multiple fields is particularly pressing, required for any novel evolutionary account to be persuasive, and for the project’s continued progress. Moreover, Morley convincingly demonstrates that there is much more to understanding musicality than is supposed by some theorists. I outline Morley’s review (...)
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  33. Donald Symons (1980). Précis of The Evolution of Human Sexuality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):171.score: 168.0
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  34. Denis Dutton (2009). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution. Bloomsbury Press.score: 168.0
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
     
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  35. Erich Jantsch (1975). Design for Evolution: Self-Organization and Planning in the Life of Human Systems. G. Braziller.score: 168.0
     
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  36. Justine Kingsbury (2011). (R)Evolutionary Aesthetics: Denis Dutton's The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure and Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):141-150.score: 162.0
    Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct succeeds admirably in showing that it is possible to think about art from a biological point of view, and this is a significant achievement, given that resistance to the idea that cultural phenomena have biological underpinnings remains widespread in many academic disciplines. However, his account of the origins of our artistic impulses and the far-reaching conclusions he draws from that account are not persuasive. This article points out a number of problems: in particular, problems with (...)
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  37. Sylvia Blad (2010). The Impact of 'Anthropotechnology' on Human Evolution. Techne 14 (2):72-87.score: 162.0
    From the time that they diverged from their common ancestor, chimpanzees and humans have had a very different evolutionary path. It seems obvious that the appearance of culture and technology has increasingly alienated humans from the path of natural selection that has informed chimpanzee evolution. According to philosopher Peter Sloterdijk any type of technology is bound to have genetic effects. But to what extent do genomic comparisons provide evidence for such an impact of ‘anthropotechnology’ on our biological evolution?
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  38. Jessica Ash & Gordon G. Gallup Jr (2007). Paleoclimatic Variation and Brain Expansion During Human Evolution. Human Nature 18 (2):109-124.score: 162.0
    One of the major adaptations during the evolution of Homo sapiens was an increase in brain size. Here we present evidence that a significant and substantial proportion of variation in brain size may be related to changes in temperature. Based on a sample of 109 fossilized hominid skulls, we found that cranial capacities were highly correlated with paleoclimatic changes in temperature, as indexed by oxygen isotope data and sea-surface temperature. Indeed, as much as 52% of the variance in the (...)
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  39. Radhakamal Mukerjee (1963). The Dimensions of Human Evolution. London, Macmillan.score: 162.0
     
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  40. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther & Fabrizzio Guerrero McManus (forthcoming). Review of Michael Ruse, The Philosophy of Human Evolution. 2012. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 978052113372. $26.99 Paperback. [REVIEW] Evolution.score: 156.0
  41. John W. Cooper (2013). Created for Everlasting Life: Can Theistic Evolution Provide an Adequate Christian Account of Human Nature? Zygon 48 (2):478-495.score: 156.0
    Christians who affirm standard science and the biblical doctrine of creation often endorse theistic evolution as the best approach to human origins. But theistic evolution is ambiguous. Some versions are naturalistic (NTE)—God created humans entirely by evolution—and some are supernaturalistic (STE)—God supernaturally augmented evolution. This article claims that NTE is inadequate as an account of human origins because its theological naturalism and emergent physicalist ontology of the soul or person conflict with the Christian doctrine (...)
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  42. Michael Lamport Commons & Patrice Marie Miller (2002). A Complete Theory of Human Evolution of Intelligence Must Consider Stage Changes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):404-405.score: 156.0
    We show 13 stages of the development of tool-use and tool making during different eras in the evolution of Homo sapiens. We used the NeoPiagetian Model of Hierarchical Complexity rather than Piaget's. We distinguished the use of existing methods imitated or learned from others, from doing such a task on one's own.
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  43. P. Thomas Schoenemann (2001). Brain Scaling, Behavioral Ability, and Human Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):293-295.score: 156.0
    The existence of linked regularities in size among brain components across species is, by itself, not a strong argument against the importance of behavioral selection in brain evolution. A careful consideration of hominid brain evolution suggests that brain components can change their scaling relationships over time, and that behavioral selection was likely crucial. The best neuroanatomical index of a given behavioral ability can only be determined empirically, not through comparative analysis of brain anatomy alone.
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  44. Gregory Sullivan (2011). The Instinctual Nation-State: Non-Darwinian Theories, State Science and Ultra-Nationalism in Oka Asajirō's "Evolution and Human Life". [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (3):547 - 586.score: 156.0
    In his anthology of socio-political essays, Evolution and Human Life, Oka Asajirō (1868-1944), early twentieth century Japan's foremost advocate of evolutionism, developed a biological vision of the nation-state as super-organism that reflected the concerns and aims of German-inspired Meiji statism and anticipated aspects of radical ultra-nationalism. Drawing on non-Darwinian doctrines, Oka attempted to realize such a fused or organic state by enhancing social instincts that would bind the minzoku (ethnic nation) and state into a single living entity. Though (...)
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  45. Frank Marlowe (2000). Good Genes and Parental Care in Human Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):611-612.score: 156.0
    Prior to agriculture, human societies were small, with little variation for good genes sexual selection (GGSS) to work on. Across cultures, variation in paternal care makes the benefits of GGSS highly variable. Despite these caveats, female preferences for traits like male body symmetry suggest one reason for female short-term mating is gene shopping.
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  46. Brian McLoone & Rory Smead (2014). The Ontogeny and Evolution of Human Collaboration. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):559-576.score: 156.0
    How is the human tendency and ability to collaborate acquired and how did it evolve? This paper explores the ontogeny and evolution of human collaboration using a combination of theoretical and empirical resources. We present a game theoretic model of the evolution of learning in the Stag Hunt game, which predicts the evolution of a built-in cooperative bias. We then survey recent empirical results on the ontogeny of collaboration in humans, which suggest the ability to (...)
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  47. Peter J. Richerson & Robert Boyd, Evolution on a Restless Planet: Were Environmental Variability and Environmental Change Major Drivers of Human Evolution?score: 156.0
    Two kinds of factors set the tempo and direction of organic and cultural evolution, those external to biotic evolutionary process, such as changes in the earth’s physical and chemical environments, and those internal to it, such as the time required for chance factors to lead lineages across adaptive valleys to a new niche space (Valentine 1985). The relative importance of these two sorts of processes is widely debated. Valentine (1973) argued that marine invertebrate diversity patterns responded to seafloor spreading (...)
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  48. Denis Dutton (2010). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution. OUP Oxford.score: 156.0
    The Dinka have a connoisseur's appreciation of the patterns and colours of the markings on their cattle. The Japanese tea ceremony is regarded as a performance art. Some cultures produce carving but no drawing; others specialize in poetry. Yet despite the rich variety of artistic expression to be found across many cultures, we all share a deep sense of aesthetic pleasure. The need to create art of some form is found in every human society. -/- In The Art Instinct, (...)
     
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  49. Steve Jones (2012). Is Human Evolution Over? In Martin H. Brinkworth & Friedel Weinert (eds.), Evolution 2.0: Implications of Darwinism in Philosophy and the Social and Natural Sciences. Springer.score: 156.0
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  50. B. R. Seshachar (1983). Biological Foundations of Human Evolution and Consciousness. In Kishor Gandhi (ed.), The Evolution of Consciousness. Paragon House. 26--36.score: 156.0
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