Search results for 'Human evolution Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 657.0
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
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  2. Florian von Schilcher (1984). Philosophy, Evolution, and Human Nature. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 579.0
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  3. Russell Powell (2014). The Philosophy of Human Evolution: Contemporary Debates in Historical Context. Metascience 23 (2):285-291.score: 522.0
    What does human evolutionary theory reveal about the origins of human nature and the constraints it imposes on human cognition, behavior, and society? “The whole field of human evolution is pregnant with philosophical questions of great interest”, Michael Ruse concludes in the final passage of The Philosophy of Human Evolution. This engaging and eminently readable romp through the philosophical landscape of human evolution fills a significant niche in the existing literature. (...)
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  4. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther & Fabrizzio Guerrero McManus (2013). Review of Michael Ruse, The Philosophy of Human Evolution. 2012. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 978052113372. $26.99 Paperback. [REVIEW] Evolution 68 (3):920-21.score: 444.0
  5. Catherine Driscoll (2013). Essay Review:The Philosophy of Human EvolutionMichael Ruse , The Philosophy of Human Evolution . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (2012), 282 Pp., $99.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 80 (1):160-164.score: 444.0
  6. R. G. Delisle (2012). Human Evolution: An Agenda for History, Philosophy, and Social Studies. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 34 (1-2):3.score: 444.0
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  7. Catherine Driscoll (2013). Essay Review: The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Philosophy of Science 80 (1):160-164.score: 444.0
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  8. Christopher J. Wills (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. BioScience 62 (9):843-844.score: 435.0
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  9. Michael Ruse (2012). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 432.0
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements; 1. Evolutionary biology; 2. Human evolution; 3. Real science, good science?; 4. Progress; 5. Knowledge; 6. Morality; 7. Sex, orientation, and race; 8. From eugenics to medicine; Bibliography.
     
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  10. Grzegorz Bugajak & Jacek Tomczyk (2009). Human Origins: Continuous Evolution Versus Punctual Creation. In Pranab Das (ed.), Global Perspectives on Science and Spirituality. Templeton Press. 143–164.score: 423.0
    One of the particular problems in the debate between science and theology regarding human origins seems to be an apparent controversy between the continuous character of evolutionary processes leading to the origin of Homo sapiens and the punctual understanding of the act of creation of man seen as taking place in a moment in time. The paper elaborates scientific arguments for continuity or discontinuity of evolution, and what follows, for the existence or nonexistence of a clear borderline between (...)
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  11. M. Scott Ruse (2005). Technology and the Evolution of the Human: From Bergson to the Philosophy of Technology. Essays in Philosophy 6 (1):27.score: 414.0
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  12. Anthony O'hear (1985). Philosophy, Evolution and Human Nature. Philosophical Books 26 (1):45-47.score: 405.0
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  13. M. Potts (1996). The Evolution of Human Sexual Intercourse. A Revisited Philosophy: Sex Without Reproduction. Global Bioethics 9 (1-4):229-240.score: 405.0
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  14. Anthony O'Hear (1997). Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation. Oxford University Press.score: 390.0
    In this controversial new book O'Hear takes a stand against the fashion for explaining human behavior in terms of evolution. He contends that while the theory of evolution is successful in explaining the development of the natural world in general, it is of limited value when applied to the human world. Because of our reflectiveness and our rationality we take on goals and ideals which cannot be justified in terms of survival-promotion or reproductive advantage. O'Hear examines (...)
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  15. P. Rajagopalachari (1994). Role of the Master in Human Evolution: Proceedings of the Sahaj Marg Seminars, Held at Vorauf-Munich, Paris and Marseilles From June 28 to July 13, 1986. [REVIEW] Shri Ram Chandra Mission.score: 390.0
     
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  16. Terrence Twomey (2014). How Domesticating Fire Facilitated the Evolution of Human Cooperation. Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):89-99.score: 309.0
    Controlled fire use by early humans could have facilitated the evolution of human cooperation. Individuals with regular access to the benefits of domestic fire would have been at an advantage over those with limited or no access. However, a campfire would have been relatively costly for an individual to maintain and open to free riders. By cooperating, individuals could have reduced maintenance costs, minimized free riding and lessened the risk of being without fire. Cooperators were more likely to (...)
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  17. Russell Powell, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2012). Evolution, Genetic Engineering, and Human Enhancement. Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):439-458.score: 303.0
    There are many ways that biological theory can inform ethical discussions of genetic engineering and biomedical enhancement. In this essay, we highlight some of these potential contributions, and along the way provide a synthetic overview of the papers that comprise this special issue. We begin by comparing and contrasting genetic engineering with programs of selective breeding that led to the domestication of plants and animals, and we consider how genetic engineering differs from other contemporary biotechnologies such as embryo selection. We (...)
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  18. Anton Killin (2014). Musicality in Human Evolution, Archaeology and Ethnography. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):597-609.score: 300.0
    This essay reviews Iain Morley’s The Prehistory of Music, an up-to-date and authoritative overview of recent research on evolution and cognition of musicality from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. Given the diversity of the project explored, integration of evidence from multiple fields is particularly pressing, required for any novel evolutionary account to be persuasive, and for the project’s continued progress. Moreover, Morley convincingly demonstrates that there is much more to understanding musicality than is supposed by some theorists. I outline Morley’s review (...)
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  19. Denis Dutton (2009). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution. Bloomsbury Press.score: 291.0
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
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  20. Brian McLoone & Rory Smead (2014). The Ontogeny and Evolution of Human Collaboration. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):559-576.score: 288.0
    How is the human tendency and ability to collaborate acquired and how did it evolve? This paper explores the ontogeny and evolution of human collaboration using a combination of theoretical and empirical resources. We present a game theoretic model of the evolution of learning in the Stag Hunt game, which predicts the evolution of a built-in cooperative bias. We then survey recent empirical results on the ontogeny of collaboration in humans, which suggest the ability to (...)
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  21. John Lemos (2008). Commonsense Darwinism: Evolution, Morality, and the Human Condition. Open Court.score: 288.0
    Introduction -- Defending a socio-biological account of morality -- Non-objectivist evolutionary ethics -- Recent objectivist approaches to evolutionary ethics -- Sketch of an Aristotelian evolutionary ethics -- Evolutionary biology and the moral status of animals -- Faith, reason, and evolutionary epistemology -- Psychological egoism and evolutionary biology -- Evolution and free will : darwinian non-naturalism defended -- Recent developments in philosophy of evolution.
     
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  22. Cameron Shelley (1999). Preadaptation and the Explanation of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):65-82.score: 279.0
    The concept of preadaptation, though useful, continues to trouble evolutionary scientists. Usually, it is treated as if it were really adaptation, prompting such diverse theorists as Gould and Vrba, and Dennett to suggest its removal from evolutionary theory altogether. In this paper, I argue that the as-if sense is ill-founded, and that the sense of preadaptation as a process may be defended as unequivocal and generally useful in evolutionary explanations, even in such problem areas as human evolution.
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  23. Jochen Fahrenberg Marcus Cheetham (2007). Assumptions About Human Nature and the Impact of Philosophical Concepts on Professional Issues: A Questionnaire-Based Study with 800 Students From Psychology, Philosophy, and Science. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 183-201.score: 270.0
    Philosophical anthropology is concerned with assumptions about human nature, differential psychology with the empirical investigation of such belief systems. A questionnaire composed of 64 questions concerning brain and consciousness, free will, evolution, meaning of life, belief in God, and theodicy problem was used to gather data from 563 students of psychology at seven universities and from 233 students enrolled in philosophy or the natural sciences. Essential concepts were monism–dualism–complementarity, atheism–agnosticism–deism–theism, attitude toward transcendence–immanence, and self-ratings of religiosity and (...)
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  24. Jan Feys (1973). The Philosophy of Evolution in Sri Aurobindo and Teilhard De Chardin. Calcutta,Firma K. L. Mukhopadhyay.score: 264.0
     
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  25. Ervin Laszlo & David Loye (eds.) (1998). The Evolutionary Outrider: The Impact of the Human Agent on Evolution: Essays Honoring Ervin Laszlo. Praeger.score: 264.0
  26. Helen de Cruz & Johan de Smedt (2007). The Role of Intuitive Ontologies in Scientific Understanding – the Case of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):351-368.score: 261.0
    Psychological evidence suggests that laypeople understand the world around them in terms of intuitive ontologies which describe broad categories of objects in the world, such as ‘person’, ‘artefact’ and ‘animal’. However, because intuitive ontologies are the result of natural selection, they only need to be adaptive; this does not guarantee that the knowledge they provide is a genuine reflection of causal mechanisms in the world. As a result, science has parted ways with intuitive ontologies. Nevertheless, since the brain is evolved (...)
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  27. Stephen Davies (2012). The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution. Oup Oxford.score: 261.0
    Stephen Davies presents a fascinating exploration of the idea that art, and our aesthetic sensibilities more generally, should be understood as an element in human evolution. He asks: Do animals have aesthetics? Do our aesthetic preferences have prehistoric roots? Is art universal? What is the biological role of aesthetic and artistic behaviour?
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  28. Janet Radcliffe Richards (2000). Human Nature After Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 255.0
    Human Nature After Darwin is an original investigation of the implications of Darwinism for our understanding of ourselves and our situation. It casts new light on current Darwinian controversies, and in doing so provides an introduction to philosophical reasoning and a range of philosophical problems. Janet Radcliffe Richards claims that many current battles about Darwinism, in particular about evolutionary psychology and religion, are based on mistaken assumptions about the implications of the rival views. Her analysis of these implications provides (...)
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  29. Don Ross (2012). What Can Economics Contribute to the Study of Human Evolution? Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):287-297.score: 255.0
    The revised edition of Paul Seabright’s The Company of Strangers is critically reviewed. Seabright aims to help non-economists participating in the cross-disciplinary study of the evolution of human sociality appreciate the potential value that can be added by economists. Though the book includes nicely constructed and vivid essays on a range of economic topics, in its main ambition it largely falls short. The most serious problem is endorsement of the so-called strong reciprocity hypothesis that has been promoted by (...)
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  30. Russell Powell (2012). The Future of Human Evolution. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (1):145-175.score: 255.0
    There is a tendency in both scientific and humanistic disciplines to think of biological evolution in humans as significantly impeded if not completely overwhelmed by the robust cultural and technological capabilities of the species. The aim of this article is to make sense of and evaluate this claim. In Section 2 , I flesh out the argument that humans are ‘insulated’ from ordinary evolutionary mechanisms in terms of our contemporary biological understandings of phenotypic plasticity, niche construction, and cultural transmission. (...)
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  31. Erich Jantsch (1980). The Self-Organizing Universe: Scientific and Human Implications of the Emerging Paradigm of Evolution. Pergamon Press.score: 252.0
     
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  32. Steve Jones (2012). Is Human Evolution Over? In Martin H. Brinkworth & Friedel Weinert (eds.), Evolution 2.0: Implications of Darwinism in Philosophy and the Social and Natural Sciences. Springer.score: 246.0
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  33. Justine Kingsbury (2011). (R)Evolutionary Aesthetics: Denis Dutton's The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure and Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):141-150.score: 237.0
    Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct succeeds admirably in showing that it is possible to think about art from a biological point of view, and this is a significant achievement, given that resistance to the idea that cultural phenomena have biological underpinnings remains widespread in many academic disciplines. However, his account of the origins of our artistic impulses and the far-reaching conclusions he draws from that account are not persuasive. This article points out a number of problems: in particular, problems with (...)
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  34. Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.score: 228.0
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance the quality (...)
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  35. J. Radcliffe Richards (2000). Human Nature After Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 228.0
    The lucid presentation makes the book an ideal introduction to both philosophy and Darwinism, as well as a substantive contribution to topics of intense current ...
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  36. Henry Edward Middleton (1982). Human Evolution: A Scientific Sociological Analysis. Merlin Books.score: 228.0
     
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  37. Colin Wilson (1968). Human Evolution & a New Psychology. Big Sur Recordings..score: 228.0
     
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  38. Peter Carruthers (2002). Human Creativity: Its Cognitive Basis, its Evolution, and its Connections with Childhood Pretence. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (2):225-249.score: 225.0
    This paper defends two initial claims. First, it argues that essentially the same cognitive resources are shared by adult creative thinking and problem-solving, on the one hand, and by childhood pretend play, on the other—namely, capacities to generate and to reason with suppositions (or imagined possibilities). Second, it argues that the evolutionary function of childhood pretence is to practice and enhance adult forms of creativity. The paper goes on to show how these proposals can provide a smooth and evolutionarily-plausible explanation (...)
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  39. Brian McLoone (2012). Collaboration and Human Social Evolution: Review of Michael Tomasello's Why We Cooperate (MIT Press, 2009). [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):137-147.score: 225.0
    Michael Tomasello’s new book Why We Cooperate explores the ontogeny and evolution of human altruism and human cooperation, paying particular attention to how such behaviors allow humans to create social institutions.
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  40. G. R. Pitman (2011). The Evolution of Human Warfare. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (3):352-379.score: 225.0
    Here we propose a new theory for the origins and evolution of human warfare as a complex social phenomenon involving several behavioral traits, including aggression, risk taking, male bonding, ingroup altruism, outgroup xenophobia, dominance and subordination, and territoriality, all of which are encoded in the human genome. Among the family of great apes only chimpanzees and humans engage in war; consequently, warfare emerged in their immediate common ancestor that lived in patrilocal groups who fought one another for (...)
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  41. Neven Sesardic (2003). Evolution of Human Jealousy a Just-so Story or a Just-so Criticism? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (4):427-443.score: 225.0
    To operationalize the methodological assessment of evolutionary psychology, three requirements are proposed that, if satisfied, would show that a hypothesis is not a just-so story: (1) theoretical entrenchment (i.e., that the hypothesis under consideration is a consequence of a more fundamental theory that is empirically well-confirmed across a very wide range of phenomena), (2) predictive success (i.e., that the hypothesis generates concrete predictions that make it testable and eventually to a certain extent corroborated), and (3) failure of rival explanations (i.e., (...)
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  42. David P. Barash (2008). Natural Selections: Selfish Altruists, Honest Liars, and Other Realities of Evolution. Bellevue Literary Press.score: 225.0
  43. Rudolf Harmsen (2010). Love and War: Human Nature in Crisis. Robert D. Reed Publishers.score: 225.0
     
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  44. Leonid Perlovsky (2013). A Challenge to Human Evolution—Cognitive Dissonance. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 224.0
    A challenge to human evolution—cognitive dissonance.
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  45. Timothy Clack (2009). Ancestral Roots: Modern Living and Human Evolution. Macmillan.score: 224.0
    Human evolution explains how we have found ourselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Issues of modern living; depression, obesity, and environmental destruction, can be understood in relation to our evolutionary past. This book shows how an awareness of this past and its relation to the present can help limit their impact on the future.
     
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  46. Allan Gibbard (1982). Human Evolution and the Sense of Justice. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 7 (1):31-46.score: 219.0
  47. Catherine Driscoll (2012). Evolution and the Loss of Hierarchies: Dubreuil's “Human Evolution and the Origin of Hierarchies: The State of Nature”. Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):125-135.score: 219.0
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  48. Stephen Shennan (2008). Not by Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution, by Peter J. Richerson and Robert Boyd. Biology and Philosophy 23 (2):293-299.score: 219.0
  49. Mark J. Pallen (2009). The Rough Guide to Evolution. Rough Guides.score: 219.0
    Presents an introduction to evolutionary theory and describes the impact of the works and ideas of Charles Darwin have had on science and society.
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  50. Richard G. Delisle (2000). The Biology/Culture Link in Human Evolution, 1750–1950: The Problem of Integration in Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 31 (4):531-556.score: 219.0
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