Search results for 'Human evolution Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 161.0
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
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  2. Florian von Schilcher (1984). Philosophy, Evolution, and Human Nature. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 139.0
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  3. Grzegorz Bugajak & Jacek Tomczyk (2009). Human Origins: Continuous Evolution Versus Punctual Creation. In Pranab Das (ed.), Global Perspectives on Science and Spirituality. Templeton Press. 143–164.score: 117.0
    One of the particular problems in the debate between science and theology regarding human origins seems to be an apparent controversy between the continuous character of evolutionary processes leading to the origin of Homo sapiens and the punctual understanding of the act of creation of man seen as taking place in a moment in time. The paper elaborates scientific arguments for continuity or discontinuity of evolution, and what follows, for the existence or nonexistence of a clear borderline between (...)
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  4. Michael Ruse (2012). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 116.0
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements; 1. Evolutionary biology; 2. Human evolution; 3. Real science, good science?; 4. Progress; 5. Knowledge; 6. Morality; 7. Sex, orientation, and race; 8. From eugenics to medicine; Bibliography.
     
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  5. Anthony O'Hear (1997). Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation. Oxford University Press.score: 106.0
    In this controversial new book O'Hear takes a stand against the fashion for explaining human behavior in terms of evolution. He contends that while the theory of evolution is successful in explaining the development of the natural world in general, it is of limited value when applied to the human world. Because of our reflectiveness and our rationality we take on goals and ideals which cannot be justified in terms of survival-promotion or reproductive advantage. O'Hear examines (...)
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  6. P. Rajagopalachari (1994). Role of the Master in Human Evolution: Proceedings of the Sahaj Marg Seminars, Held at Vorauf-Munich, Paris and Marseilles From June 28 to July 13, 1986. [REVIEW] Shri Ram Chandra Mission.score: 102.0
     
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  7. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther & Fabrizzio Guerrero McManus (forthcoming). Review of Michael Ruse, The Philosophy of Human Evolution. 2012. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 978052113372. $26.99 Paperback. [REVIEW] Evolution.score: 90.0
  8. Catherine Driscoll (2013). Essay Review:The Philosophy of Human EvolutionMichael Ruse , The Philosophy of Human Evolution . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (2012), 282 Pp., $99.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 80 (1):160-164.score: 90.0
  9. R. G. Delisle (2012). Human Evolution: An Agenda for History, Philosophy, and Social Studies. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 34 (1-2):3.score: 90.0
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  10. Catherine Driscoll (2013). Essay Review: The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Philosophy of Science 80 (1):160-164.score: 90.0
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  11. Russell Powell (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Human Evolution: Contemporary Debates in Historical Context. Metascience:1-7.score: 87.0
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  12. Christopher J. Wills (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Bioscience 62 (9):843-844.score: 87.0
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  13. Timothy Clack (2009). Ancestral Roots: Modern Living and Human Evolution. Macmillan.score: 84.0
    Human evolution explains how we have found ourselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Issues of modern living; depression, obesity, and environmental destruction, can be understood in relation to our evolutionary past. This book shows how an awareness of this past and its relation to the present can help limit their impact on the future.
     
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  14. M. Scott Ruse (2005). Technology and the Evolution of the Human: From Bergson to the Philosophy of Technology. Essays in Philosophy 6 (1):27.score: 84.0
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  15. Leonid Perlovsky (2013). A Challenge to Human Evolution—Cognitive Dissonance. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 84.0
    A challenge to human evolution—cognitive dissonance.
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  16. Stephen Davies (2012). The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution. Oup Oxford.score: 81.0
    Stephen Davies presents a fascinating exploration of the idea that art, and our aesthetic sensibilities more generally, should be understood as an element in human evolution. He asks: Do animals have aesthetics? Do our aesthetic preferences have prehistoric roots? Is art universal? What is the biological role of aesthetic and artistic behaviour?
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  17. Anthony O'hear (1985). Philosophy, Evolution and Human Nature. Philosophical Books 26 (1):45-47.score: 81.0
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  18. M. Potts (1996). The Evolution of Human Sexual Intercourse. A Revisited Philosophy: Sex Without Reproduction. Global Bioethics 9 (1-4):229-240.score: 81.0
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  19. Janet Radcliffe Richards (2000). Human Nature After Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 79.0
    Human Nature After Darwin is an original investigation of the implications of Darwinism for our understanding of ourselves and our situation. It casts new light on current Darwinian controversies, and in doing so provides an introduction to philosophical reasoning and a range of philosophical problems. Janet Radcliffe Richards claims that many current battles about Darwinism, in particular about evolutionary psychology and religion, are based on mistaken assumptions about the implications of the rival views. Her analysis of these implications provides (...)
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  20. Terrence Twomey (2014). How Domesticating Fire Facilitated the Evolution of Human Cooperation. Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):89-99.score: 79.0
    Controlled fire use by early humans could have facilitated the evolution of human cooperation. Individuals with regular access to the benefits of domestic fire would have been at an advantage over those with limited or no access. However, a campfire would have been relatively costly for an individual to maintain and open to free riders. By cooperating, individuals could have reduced maintenance costs, minimized free riding and lessened the risk of being without fire. Cooperators were more likely to (...)
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  21. P. Slurink, Culture and the Evolution of the Human Mating System.score: 78.0
    Contrary to chimpanzees and bonobos, humans display long-term exclusive relationships between males and females. Probably all human cultures have some kind of marriage system, apparently designed to protect these exclusive relationships and the resulting offspring in a potentially sexual competitive environment. Different hypotheses about the origin of human pair-bonds are compared and it is shown how they may refer to different phases of human evolution.
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  22. Russell Powell, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2012). Evolution, Genetic Engineering, and Human Enhancement. Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):439-458.score: 77.0
    There are many ways that biological theory can inform ethical discussions of genetic engineering and biomedical enhancement. In this essay, we highlight some of these potential contributions, and along the way provide a synthetic overview of the papers that comprise this special issue. We begin by comparing and contrasting genetic engineering with programs of selective breeding that led to the domestication of plants and animals, and we consider how genetic engineering differs from other contemporary biotechnologies such as embryo selection. We (...)
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  23. Alisa Clarke (2012). The Potential of the Human Rights-Based Approach for the Evolution of the United Nations as a System. Human Rights Review 13 (2):225-248.score: 75.0
    The United Nations (UN), facing increasingly intense challenges in the fulfillment of its mission, also harbors the potential for enhanced effectiveness, relevance, and legitimacy in the form of the human rights-based approach. The human rights-based approach (HRBA) is one model for translating the organization’s values into a more adaptive, inclusive, dynamic, and responsive system of processes and outcomes. In the arena of politics, its meeting with a meaningful degree of receptiveness could signal a growing acceptance of the validity (...)
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  24. Adam Etinson (2010). To Be or Not to Be: Charles Beitz on the Philosophy of Human Rights. Res Publica 16 (4):441-448.score: 72.0
    This is a review article of Charles Beitz's 2009 book on the philosophy of human rights, The Idea of Human Rights. The article provides a charitable overview of the book's main arguments, but also raises some doubts about the depth of the distinction between Beitz's 'practical' approach to humans rights and its 'naturalistic' counterparts.
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  25. Christine James (2008). Evolution and Conservative Christianity: How Philosophy of Science Pedagogy Can Begin the Conversation. Spontaneous Generations 2 (1):185-212.score: 72.0
    I teach Philosophy of Science at a four-year state university located in the southeastern United States with a strong college of education. This means that the Philosophy of Science class I teach attracts large numbers of students who will later become science teachers in Georgia junior high and high schools—the same schools that recently began including evolution "warning" stickers in science textbooks. I am also a faculty member in a department combining Religious Studies and Philosophy. This (...)
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  26. David L. Hull (2001). Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    One way to understand science is as a selection process. David Hull, one of the dominant figures in contemporary philosophy of science, sets out in this volume a general analysis of this selection process that applies equally to biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, operant learning, and social and conceptual change in science. Hull aims to distinguish between those characteristics that are contingent features of selection and those that are essential. Science and Selection brings (...)
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  27. Denise Dellarosa Cummins (1996). Dominance Hierarchies and the Evolution of Human Reasoning. Minds and Machines 6 (4):463-480.score: 72.0
    Research from ethology and evolutionary biology indicates the following about the evolution of reasoning capacity. First, solving problems of social competition and cooperation have direct impact on survival rates and reproductive success. Second, the social structure that evolved from this pressure is the dominance hierarchy. Third, primates that live in large groups with complex dominance hierarchies also show greater neocortical development, and concomitantly greater cognitive capacity. These facts suggest that the necessity of reasoning effectively about dominance hierarchies left an (...)
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  28. Gregory Moore (2002). Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    Nietzsche, Biology and Metaphor explores the German philosopher's response to the intellectual debates sparked by the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species. By examining the abundance of biological metaphors in Nietzsche's writings, Gregory Moore questions his recent reputation as an eminently subversive and (post) modern thinker, and shows how deeply Nietzsche was immersed in late nineteenth-century debates on evolution, degeneration and race. The first part of the book provides a detailed study and new interpretation of Nietzsche's much disputed (...)
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  29. Vladimir G. Red'ko (2000). Evolution of Cognition: Towards the Theory of Origin of Human Logic. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 5 (3):323-338.score: 72.0
    The main problem discussed in this paper is: Why and how did animal cognition abilities arise? It is argued that investigations of the evolution of animal cognition abilities are very important from an epistemological point of view. A new direction for interdisciplinary researches – the creation and development of the theory of human logic origin – is proposed. The approaches to the origination of such a theory (mathematical models of ``intelligent invention'' of biological evolution, the cybernetic schemes (...)
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  30. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 72.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
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  31. Frank Kressing, Matthis Krischel & Heiner Fangerau (forthcoming). The 'Global Phylogeny' and its Historical Legacy: A Critical Review of a Unified Theory of Human Biological and Linguistic Co-Evolution. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies:1-13.score: 72.0
    In a critical review of late twentieth-century gene-culture co-evolutionary models labelled as ‘global phylogeny’, the authors present evidence for the long legacy of co-evolutionary theories in European-based thinking, highlighting that (1) ideas of social and cultural evolution preceded the idea of biological evolution, (2) linguistics played a dominant role in the formation of a unified theory of human co-evolution, and (3) that co-evolutionary thinking was only possible due to perpetuated and renewed transdisciplinary reticulations between scholars of (...)
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  32. Anton Killin (forthcoming). Musicality in Human Evolution, Archaeology and Ethnography. Biology and Philosophy:1-13.score: 72.0
    This essay reviews Iain Morley’s The Prehistory of Music, an up-to-date and authoritative overview of recent research on evolution and cognition of musicality from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. Given the diversity of the project explored, integration of evidence from multiple fields is particularly pressing, required for any novel evolutionary account to be persuasive, and for the project’s continued progress. Moreover, Morley convincingly demonstrates that there is much more to understanding musicality than is supposed by some theorists. I outline Morley’s review (...)
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  33. John Lemos (2008). Commonsense Darwinism: Evolution, Morality, and the Human Condition. Open Court.score: 72.0
    Introduction -- Defending a socio-biological account of morality -- Non-objectivist evolutionary ethics -- Recent objectivist approaches to evolutionary ethics -- Sketch of an Aristotelian evolutionary ethics -- Evolutionary biology and the moral status of animals -- Faith, reason, and evolutionary epistemology -- Psychological egoism and evolutionary biology -- Evolution and free will : darwinian non-naturalism defended -- Recent developments in philosophy of evolution.
     
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  34. Brian McLoone & Rory Smead (forthcoming). The Ontogeny and Evolution of Human Collaboration. Biology and Philosophy:1-18.score: 72.0
    How is the human tendency and ability to collaborate acquired and how did it evolve? This paper explores the ontogeny and evolution of human collaboration using a combination of theoretical and empirical resources. We present a game theoretic model of the evolution of learning in the Stag Hunt game, which predicts the evolution of a built-in cooperative bias. We then survey recent empirical results on the ontogeny of collaboration in humans, which suggest the ability to (...)
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  35. Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.score: 70.0
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance the quality (...)
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  36. J. Radcliffe Richards (2000). Human Nature After Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 70.0
    The lucid presentation makes the book an ideal introduction to both philosophy and Darwinism, as well as a substantive contribution to topics of intense current ...
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  37. David Christian (2008). Big History. Teaching Co..score: 70.0
    Part 1. Lecture 1. What is big history? ; Lecture 2. Moving across multiple scales ; Lecture 3. Simplicity and complexity ; Lecture 4. Evidence and the nature of science ; Lecture 5. Threshold 1, Origins of Big Bang cosmology ; Lecture 6. How did everything begin? ; Lecture 7. Threshold 2, The first stars and galaxies ; Lecture 8. Threshold 3, Making chemical elements ; Lecture 9. Threshold 4, The earth and the solar system ; Lecture 10. The early (...)
     
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  38. David P. Barash (2008). Natural Selections: Selfish Altruists, Honest Liars, and Other Realities of Evolution. Bellevue Literary Press.score: 69.0
  39. Denis Dutton (2009). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution. Bloomsbury Press.score: 69.0
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
     
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  40. Rudolf Harmsen (2010). Love and War: Human Nature in Crisis. Robert D. Reed Publishers.score: 69.0
     
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  41. Mark J. Pallen (2009). The Rough Guide to Evolution. Rough Guides.score: 67.0
    Presents an introduction to evolutionary theory and describes the impact of the works and ideas of Charles Darwin have had on science and society.
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  42. Robin Allott (2001). The Great Mosaic Eye: Language and Evolution. Book Guild.score: 67.0
  43. Branka Hrvoj-Mihic, Thibault Bienvenu, Lisa Stefanacci, Alysson R. Muotri & Katerina Semendeferi (2013). Evolution, Development, and Plasticity of the Human Brain: From Molecules to Bones. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 67.0
  44. Randolph M. Nesse (1996). Evolution and Healing: The New Science of Darwinian Medicine. Phoenix.score: 67.0
    The first ever description of how evolutionary principles can be applied to questions of health and sickness.
     
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  45. Jochen Fahrenberg Marcus Cheetham (2007). Assumptions About Human Nature and the Impact of Philosophical Concepts on Professional Issues: A Questionnaire-Based Study with 800 Students From Psychology, Philosophy, and Science. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 183-201.score: 66.0
    Philosophical anthropology is concerned with assumptions about human nature, differential psychology with the empirical investigation of such belief systems. A questionnaire composed of 64 questions concerning brain and consciousness, free will, evolution, meaning of life, belief in God, and theodicy problem was used to gather data from 563 students of psychology at seven universities and from 233 students enrolled in philosophy or the natural sciences. Essential concepts were monism–dualism–complementarity, atheism–agnosticism–deism–theism, attitude toward transcendence–immanence, and self-ratings of religiosity and (...)
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  46. Antonello La Vergata (2009). Debates on Human Evolution Between the 19th and the 20th Centuries. Rivista di Filosofia 2 (2):237-262.score: 66.0
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  47. Pouwel Slurink (1993). Ecological Dominance and the Final Sprint in Hominid Evolution. Human Evolution.score: 65.0
    In contrast to many other models of human evolution the "balance of power" theory of Alexander has a clear answer to the question why a runaway selection process for unique social and moral capacities occurred in our ancestry only and not in other species: "ecological dominance" is hypothesized to have diminished the effects of "extrinsic" forces of natural selection such that within-species, intergroup competition increased (Alexander, 1989). Alexander seems to be wrong, however, in his claim that already the (...)
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  48. Cameron Shelley (1999). Preadaptation and the Explanation of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):65-82.score: 65.0
    The concept of preadaptation, though useful, continues to trouble evolutionary scientists. Usually, it is treated as if it were really adaptation, prompting such diverse theorists as Gould and Vrba, and Dennett to suggest its removal from evolutionary theory altogether. In this paper, I argue that the as-if sense is ill-founded, and that the sense of preadaptation as a process may be defended as unequivocal and generally useful in evolutionary explanations, even in such problem areas as human evolution.
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  49. António Zilhão (ed.) (2005). Evolution, Rationality, and Cognition: A Cognitive Science for the Twenty-First Century. Routledge.score: 64.0
    Evolutionary thinking has expanded in the last decades, spreading from its traditional stronghold - the explanation of speciation and adaptation in Biology - to new domains including the human sciences. The essays in this collection attest to the illuminating power of evolutionary thinking when applied to the understanding of the human mind. The contributors to Cognition, Evolution and Rationality use an evolutionary standpoint to approach the nature of the human mind, including both cognitive and behavioral functions. (...)
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  50. David Ludwig (2012). Language and Human Nature. Kurt Goldstein's Neurolinguistic Foundation of a Holistic Philosophy. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 48 (1):40-54.score: 64.0
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