Search results for 'Human evolution Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 483.0
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Florian von Schilcher (1984). Philosophy, Evolution, and Human Nature. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 417.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Grzegorz Bugajak & Jacek Tomczyk (2009). Human Origins: Continuous Evolution Versus Punctual Creation. In Pranab Das (ed.), Global Perspectives on Science and Spirituality. Templeton Press. 143–164.score: 351.0
    One of the particular problems in the debate between science and theology regarding human origins seems to be an apparent controversy between the continuous character of evolutionary processes leading to the origin of Homo sapiens and the punctual understanding of the act of creation of man seen as taking place in a moment in time. The paper elaborates scientific arguments for continuity or discontinuity of evolution, and what follows, for the existence or nonexistence of a clear borderline between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Russell Powell (2014). The Philosophy of Human Evolution: Contemporary Debates in Historical Context. Metascience 23 (2):285-291.score: 348.0
    What does human evolutionary theory reveal about the origins of human nature and the constraints it imposes on human cognition, behavior, and society? “The whole field of human evolution is pregnant with philosophical questions of great interest”, Michael Ruse concludes in the final passage of The Philosophy of Human Evolution. This engaging and eminently readable romp through the philosophical landscape of human evolution fills a significant niche in the existing literature. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Michael Ruse (2012). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 348.0
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements; 1. Evolutionary biology; 2. Human evolution; 3. Real science, good science?; 4. Progress; 5. Knowledge; 6. Morality; 7. Sex, orientation, and race; 8. From eugenics to medicine; Bibliography.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Anthony O'Hear (1997). Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation. Oxford University Press.score: 318.0
    In this controversial new book O'Hear takes a stand against the fashion for explaining human behavior in terms of evolution. He contends that while the theory of evolution is successful in explaining the development of the natural world in general, it is of limited value when applied to the human world. Because of our reflectiveness and our rationality we take on goals and ideals which cannot be justified in terms of survival-promotion or reproductive advantage. O'Hear examines (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. P. Rajagopalachari (1994). Role of the Master in Human Evolution: Proceedings of the Sahaj Marg Seminars, Held at Vorauf-Munich, Paris and Marseilles From June 28 to July 13, 1986. [REVIEW] Shri Ram Chandra Mission.score: 306.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther & Fabrizzio Guerrero McManus (forthcoming). Review of Michael Ruse, The Philosophy of Human Evolution. 2012. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 978052113372. $26.99 Paperback. [REVIEW] Evolution.score: 270.0
  9. Catherine Driscoll (2013). Essay Review:The Philosophy of Human EvolutionMichael Ruse , The Philosophy of Human Evolution . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (2012), 282 Pp., $99.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 80 (1):160-164.score: 270.0
  10. R. G. Delisle (2012). Human Evolution: An Agenda for History, Philosophy, and Social Studies. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 34 (1-2):3.score: 270.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Catherine Driscoll (2013). Essay Review: The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Philosophy of Science 80 (1):160-164.score: 270.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Christopher J. Wills (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Bioscience 62 (9):843-844.score: 261.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. M. Scott Ruse (2005). Technology and the Evolution of the Human: From Bergson to the Philosophy of Technology. Essays in Philosophy 6 (1):27.score: 252.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Stephen Davies (2012). The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution. Oup Oxford.score: 243.0
    Stephen Davies presents a fascinating exploration of the idea that art, and our aesthetic sensibilities more generally, should be understood as an element in human evolution. He asks: Do animals have aesthetics? Do our aesthetic preferences have prehistoric roots? Is art universal? What is the biological role of aesthetic and artistic behaviour?
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Anthony O'hear (1985). Philosophy, Evolution and Human Nature. Philosophical Books 26 (1):45-47.score: 243.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. M. Potts (1996). The Evolution of Human Sexual Intercourse. A Revisited Philosophy: Sex Without Reproduction. Global Bioethics 9 (1-4):229-240.score: 243.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Janet Radcliffe Richards (2000). Human Nature After Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 237.0
    Human Nature After Darwin is an original investigation of the implications of Darwinism for our understanding of ourselves and our situation. It casts new light on current Darwinian controversies, and in doing so provides an introduction to philosophical reasoning and a range of philosophical problems. Janet Radcliffe Richards claims that many current battles about Darwinism, in particular about evolutionary psychology and religion, are based on mistaken assumptions about the implications of the rival views. Her analysis of these implications provides (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Terrence Twomey (2014). How Domesticating Fire Facilitated the Evolution of Human Cooperation. Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):89-99.score: 237.0
    Controlled fire use by early humans could have facilitated the evolution of human cooperation. Individuals with regular access to the benefits of domestic fire would have been at an advantage over those with limited or no access. However, a campfire would have been relatively costly for an individual to maintain and open to free riders. By cooperating, individuals could have reduced maintenance costs, minimized free riding and lessened the risk of being without fire. Cooperators were more likely to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Russell Powell, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2012). Evolution, Genetic Engineering, and Human Enhancement. Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):439-458.score: 231.0
    There are many ways that biological theory can inform ethical discussions of genetic engineering and biomedical enhancement. In this essay, we highlight some of these potential contributions, and along the way provide a synthetic overview of the papers that comprise this special issue. We begin by comparing and contrasting genetic engineering with programs of selective breeding that led to the domestication of plants and animals, and we consider how genetic engineering differs from other contemporary biotechnologies such as embryo selection. We (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Gregory Moore (2002). Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor. Cambridge University Press.score: 216.0
    Nietzsche, Biology and Metaphor explores the German philosopher's response to the intellectual debates sparked by the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species. By examining the abundance of biological metaphors in Nietzsche's writings, Gregory Moore questions his recent reputation as an eminently subversive and (post) modern thinker, and shows how deeply Nietzsche was immersed in late nineteenth-century debates on evolution, degeneration and race. The first part of the book provides a detailed study and new interpretation of Nietzsche's much disputed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Brian McLoone & Rory Smead (2014). The Ontogeny and Evolution of Human Collaboration. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):559-576.score: 216.0
    How is the human tendency and ability to collaborate acquired and how did it evolve? This paper explores the ontogeny and evolution of human collaboration using a combination of theoretical and empirical resources. We present a game theoretic model of the evolution of learning in the Stag Hunt game, which predicts the evolution of a built-in cooperative bias. We then survey recent empirical results on the ontogeny of collaboration in humans, which suggest the ability to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Anton Killin (2014). Musicality in Human Evolution, Archaeology and Ethnography. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):597-609.score: 216.0
    This essay reviews Iain Morley’s The Prehistory of Music, an up-to-date and authoritative overview of recent research on evolution and cognition of musicality from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. Given the diversity of the project explored, integration of evidence from multiple fields is particularly pressing, required for any novel evolutionary account to be persuasive, and for the project’s continued progress. Moreover, Morley convincingly demonstrates that there is much more to understanding musicality than is supposed by some theorists. I outline Morley’s review (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. John Lemos (2008). Commonsense Darwinism: Evolution, Morality, and the Human Condition. Open Court.score: 216.0
    Introduction -- Defending a socio-biological account of morality -- Non-objectivist evolutionary ethics -- Recent objectivist approaches to evolutionary ethics -- Sketch of an Aristotelian evolutionary ethics -- Evolutionary biology and the moral status of animals -- Faith, reason, and evolutionary epistemology -- Psychological egoism and evolutionary biology -- Evolution and free will : darwinian non-naturalism defended -- Recent developments in philosophy of evolution.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.score: 210.0
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance the quality (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. J. Radcliffe Richards (2000). Human Nature After Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 210.0
    The lucid presentation makes the book an ideal introduction to both philosophy and Darwinism, as well as a substantive contribution to topics of intense current ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. David Christian (2008). Big History. Teaching Co..score: 210.0
    Part 1. Lecture 1. What is big history? ; Lecture 2. Moving across multiple scales ; Lecture 3. Simplicity and complexity ; Lecture 4. Evidence and the nature of science ; Lecture 5. Threshold 1, Origins of Big Bang cosmology ; Lecture 6. How did everything begin? ; Lecture 7. Threshold 2, The first stars and galaxies ; Lecture 8. Threshold 3, Making chemical elements ; Lecture 9. Threshold 4, The earth and the solar system ; Lecture 10. The early (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David P. Barash (2008). Natural Selections: Selfish Altruists, Honest Liars, and Other Realities of Evolution. Bellevue Literary Press.score: 207.0
  28. Denis Dutton (2009). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution. Bloomsbury Press.score: 207.0
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Rudolf Harmsen (2010). Love and War: Human Nature in Crisis. Robert D. Reed Publishers.score: 207.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Mark J. Pallen (2009). The Rough Guide to Evolution. Rough Guides.score: 201.0
    Presents an introduction to evolutionary theory and describes the impact of the works and ideas of Charles Darwin have had on science and society.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Robin Allott (2001). The Great Mosaic Eye: Language and Evolution. Book Guild.score: 201.0
  32. Randolph M. Nesse (1996). Evolution and Healing: The New Science of Darwinian Medicine. Phoenix.score: 201.0
    The first ever description of how evolutionary principles can be applied to questions of health and sickness.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jochen Fahrenberg Marcus Cheetham (2007). Assumptions About Human Nature and the Impact of Philosophical Concepts on Professional Issues: A Questionnaire-Based Study with 800 Students From Psychology, Philosophy, and Science. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 183-201.score: 198.0
    Philosophical anthropology is concerned with assumptions about human nature, differential psychology with the empirical investigation of such belief systems. A questionnaire composed of 64 questions concerning brain and consciousness, free will, evolution, meaning of life, belief in God, and theodicy problem was used to gather data from 563 students of psychology at seven universities and from 233 students enrolled in philosophy or the natural sciences. Essential concepts were monism–dualism–complementarity, atheism–agnosticism–deism–theism, attitude toward transcendence–immanence, and self-ratings of religiosity and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Cameron Shelley (1999). Preadaptation and the Explanation of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):65-82.score: 195.0
    The concept of preadaptation, though useful, continues to trouble evolutionary scientists. Usually, it is treated as if it were really adaptation, prompting such diverse theorists as Gould and Vrba, and Dennett to suggest its removal from evolutionary theory altogether. In this paper, I argue that the as-if sense is ill-founded, and that the sense of preadaptation as a process may be defended as unequivocal and generally useful in evolutionary explanations, even in such problem areas as human evolution.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. António Zilhão (ed.) (2005). Evolution, Rationality, and Cognition: A Cognitive Science for the Twenty-First Century. Routledge.score: 192.0
    Evolutionary thinking has expanded in the last decades, spreading from its traditional stronghold - the explanation of speciation and adaptation in Biology - to new domains including the human sciences. The essays in this collection attest to the illuminating power of evolutionary thinking when applied to the understanding of the human mind. The contributors to Cognition, Evolution and Rationality use an evolutionary standpoint to approach the nature of the human mind, including both cognitive and behavioral functions. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jan Feys (1973). The Philosophy of Evolution in Sri Aurobindo and Teilhard De Chardin. Calcutta,Firma K. L. Mukhopadhyay.score: 192.0
  37. Ervin Laszlo & David Loye (eds.) (1998). The Evolutionary Outrider: The Impact of the Human Agent on Evolution: Essays Honoring Ervin Laszlo. Praeger.score: 192.0
  38. Robert Bainbridge (1971). Evolution, Education, and the Destiny of Man.score: 189.0
  39. Mario von Cranach (1976). Methods Of Inference From Animal To Human Behaviour. The Hague: Mouton.score: 189.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Tim Ingold (2000). The Perception of the Environment: Essays on Livelihood, Dwelling & Skill. Routledge.score: 183.0
    In this work Tim Ingold provides a persuasive new approach to the theory behind our perception of the world around us. The core of the argument is that where we refer to cultural variation we should be instead be talking about variation in skill. Neither genetically innate or culturally acquired, skills are incorporated into the human organism through practice and training in an environment.They are as much biological as cultural.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jacek Tomczyk & Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). On Evolution and Creation: Problem Solved? The Polish Example. Zygon 44 (4):859-878.score: 182.0
    We present the results of research carried out as a part of the project “Current Controversies about Human Origins: Between Anthropology and the Bible”, which focused on the supposed conflict between natural sciences and some branches of the humanities, notably philosophy and theology, with regard to human origins. One way to tackle the issue was to distribute a questionnaire among students and teachers of the relevant disciplines. Teachers of religion and the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, and physics) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Raymond Tallis (2010). Michelangelo's Finger: An Exploration of Everyday Transcendence. Yale University Press.score: 180.0
    How to point : a primer for Martians -- What it takes to be a pointer -- Do animals get the point? -- People who don't point -- Pinning language to the world -- Pointing and power -- Assisted pointing and pointing by proxy -- The transcendent animal : pointing and the beyond.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. V. H. Ironside (1995). The Willers of the Will. Book Guild.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Erich Jantsch (1980). The Self-Organizing Universe: Scientific and Human Implications of the Emerging Paradigm of Evolution. Pergamon Press.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Raffaele Prodomo (2007). La Natura Umana: Evoluzionismo E Storicismo. Marco.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Alexander Frank Skutch (1985). Life Ascending. University of Texas Press.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Helen de Cruz & Johan de Smedt (2007). The Role of Intuitive Ontologies in Scientific Understanding – the Case of Human Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):351-368.score: 177.0
    Psychological evidence suggests that laypeople understand the world around them in terms of intuitive ontologies which describe broad categories of objects in the world, such as ‘person’, ‘artefact’ and ‘animal’. However, because intuitive ontologies are the result of natural selection, they only need to be adaptive; this does not guarantee that the knowledge they provide is a genuine reflection of causal mechanisms in the world. As a result, science has parted ways with intuitive ontologies. Nevertheless, since the brain is evolved (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (1995). Making Sense of Humanity and Other Philosophical Papers, 1982-1993. Cambridge University Press.score: 174.0
    This new volume of philosophical papers by Bernard Williams is divided into three sections: the first Action, Freedom, Responsibility, the second Philosophy, Evolution and the Human Sciences; in which appears the essay which gives the collection its title; and the third Ethics, which contains essays closely related to his 1983 book Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. Like the two earlier volumes of Williams's papers published by Cambridge University Press, Problems of the Self and Moral Luck, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. James H. Fetzer (1984). Macarthur Lecture No.score: 174.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Cecil Hugh Latimer-Needham (1973). Man's Dilemma. Volturna Press.score: 174.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000