Search results for 'Human gene libraries' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner (ed.) (2009). Human Genetic Biobanks in Asia: Politics of Trust and Scientific Advancement. Routledge.score: 72.0
    This volume investigates human genetic biobanking and its regulation in various Asian countries and areas, including Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, ...
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  2. Veikko Launis (2002). Human Gene Therapy and the Slippery Slope Argument. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (2):169-179.score: 62.0
    The article investigates the validity of two different versions of the slippery slope argument construed in relation to human gene therapy: the empirical and the conceptual argument. The empirical version holds that our accepting somatic cell therapy will eventually cause our accepting eugenic medical goals. The conceptual version holds that we are logically committed to accepting such goals once we have accepted somatic cell therapy. It is argued that neither the empirical nor the conceptual version of the argument (...)
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  3. Annabelle Lever, Ethics and the Patenting of Human Genes.score: 62.0
    Human gene patents are patents on human genes that have been removed from human bodies and scientifically isolated and manipulated in a laboratory. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (the USPTO) has issued thousands of patents on such genes, and patents have also been granted by the European Patent Office, (the EPO). Legal and moral justification, however, are not identical, and it is possible for a legal decision to be immoral although consistent with legal precedent and (...)
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  4. Nils Holtug (1993). Human Gene Therapy: Down the Slippery Slope? Bioethics 7 (5):402-419.score: 56.0
    The strength of a slippery slope argument is a matter of some dispute. Some see it as a reasonable argument pointing out what probably or inevitably follows from adopting some practice, others see it as essentially a fallacious argument. However, there seems to be a tendency emerging to say that in many cases, the argument is not actually fallacious, although it may be unsubstantiated. I shall not try to settle this general discussion, but merely seek to assess the strength of (...)
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  5. T. McGleenan (1995). Human Gene Therapy and Slippery Slope Arguments. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (6):350-355.score: 56.0
    Any suggestion of altering the genetic makeup of human beings through gene therapy is quite likely to provoke a response involving some reference to a 'slippery slope'. In this article the author examines the topography of two different types of slippery slope argument, the logical slippery slope and the rhetorical slippery slope argument. The logical form of the argument suggests that if we permit somatic cell gene therapy then we are committed to accepting germ line gene (...)
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  6. W. French Anderson (1989). Human Gene Therapy: Why Draw a Line? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (6):681-693.score: 54.0
    Despite widespread agreement that it would be ethical to use somatic cell gene therapy to correct serious diseases, there is still uneasiness on the part of the public about this procedure. The basis for this concern lies less with the procedure's clinical risks than with fear that genetic engineering could lead to changes in human nature. Legitimate concerns about the potential for misuse of gene transfer technology justify drawing a moral line that includes corrective germline therapy but (...)
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  7. John C. Fletcher (1985). Ethical Issues in and Beyond Prospective Clinical Trials of Human Gene Therapy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (3):293-310.score: 54.0
    As the potential for the first human trials of somatic cell gene therapy nears, two ethical issues are examined: (1) problems of moral choice for members of institutional review boards who consider the first protocols, for parents, and for the clinical researchers, and the special protections that may be required for the infants and children to be involved, and (2) ethical objections to somatic cell therapy made by those concerned about a putative inevitable progression of genetic knowledge from (...)
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  8. David B. Resnik (1997). The Morality of Human Gene Patents. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (1):43-61.score: 48.7
    : This paper discusses the morality of patenting human genes and genetic technologies. After examining arguments on different sides of the issue, the paper concludes that there are, at present, no compelling reasons to prohibit the extension of current patent laws to the realm of human genetics. However, since advances in genetics are likely to have profound social implications, the most prudent course of action demands a continual reexamination of genetics laws and policies in light of ongoing developments (...)
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  9. David Resnik (1994). Debunking the Slippery Slope Argument Against Human Germ-Line Gene Therapy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (1):23-40.score: 48.0
    This paper attempts to debunk the slippery-slope argument against human germ-line gene therapy by showing that the downside of the slope – genetic enhancement – need not be as unethical or unjust as some people have supposed. It argues that if genetic enhancement is governed by proper regulations and is accompanied by adequate education, then it need not violate recognized principles of morality or social justice. Keywords: germ-line therapy, slippery slope argument, future generations, social justice CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us (...)
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  10. W. French Anderson (1985). Human Gene Therapy: Scientific and Ethical Considerations. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (3):275-292.score: 48.0
    types of application of genetic engineering for the insertion of genes into humans. The scientific requirements and the ethical issues associated with each type are discussed. Somatic cell gene therapy is technically the simplest and ethically the least controversial. The first clinical trials will probably be undertaken within the next year. Germ line gene therapy will require major advances in our present knowledge and it raises ethical issues that are now being debated. In order to provide guidelines for (...)
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  11. Maurizio Salvi (2001). Shaping Individuality: Human Inheritable Germ Line Gene Modification. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (6):527-542.score: 48.0
    In this paper I deal with ethical factors surrounding germline gene therapy. Such implications include intergenerational responsibility, human dignity, moral status of embryos and so on. I will explore the relevance of the above mentioned issues to discuss the ethical implication of human germline gene therapy (HGLT). We will see that most of arguments claimed by bioethicists do not provide valid reason to oppose HGLT. I will propose an alternative view, based on personal identity issues, to (...)
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  12. Rogeer Hoedemaekers (2001). Human Gene Patents: Core Issues in a Multi-Layered Debate. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):211-221.score: 47.0
    After ten years of debate Directive 98/44/EG on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions was adopted in 1998. This directive takes decisions on some controversial bioethical and legal issues and offers the European biotech industries more space to develop their inventions, but leaves a number of philosophical and moral issues unresolved. This paper distinguishes between different layers in the debate and maps its modes of argumentation. Major philosophical, ethical and conceptual issues are located. It is argued that further analysis of (...)
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  13. Robin O. Andreasen & Milo J. Aukerman (2002). The Human Genome Project: A Reply to Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):673-678.score: 45.0
    In this paper we discuss the scientific value of the human genome project. To what extent is the data obtained by sequencing the entire human genome useful in the gene dicovery process? Responding to Alex Rosenberg' skepticism about the value of such data, we maintain that brute sequence data is much more useful than he suggests.
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  14. Isaac Rabino (2003). Gene Therapy: Ethical Issues. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (1):31-58.score: 45.0
    To discern the ethical issues involved incurrent gene therapy research, to explore theproblems inherent in possible future genetherapies, and to encourage debate within thescientific community about ethical questionsrelevant to both, we surveyed American Societyof Human Genetics scientists who engage inhuman genetics research. This study of theopinions of U.S. scientific experts about theethical issues discussed in the literature ongene therapy contributes systematic data on theattitudes of those working in the field as wellas elaborative comments. Our survey finds thatrespondents are (...)
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  15. Frank Kressing, Matthis Krischel & Heiner Fangerau (2014). The 'Global Phylogeny' and its Historical Legacy: A Critical Review of a Unified Theory of Human Biological and Linguistic Co-Evolution. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):15-27.score: 45.0
    In a critical review of late twentieth-century gene-culture co-evolutionary models labelled as ‘global phylogeny’, the authors present evidence for the long legacy of co-evolutionary theories in European-based thinking, highlighting that (1) ideas of social and cultural evolution preceded the idea of biological evolution, (2) linguistics played a dominant role in the formation of a unified theory of human co-evolution, and (3) that co-evolutionary thinking was only possible due to perpetuated and renewed transdisciplinary reticulations between scholars of different disciplines—especially (...)
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  16. Marianne Sommer (2008). History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473 - 528.score: 45.0
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize (...)
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  17. Yushi Jiang, Soo H. Chew & Richard P. Ebstein (2013). The Role of D4 Receptor Gene Exon III Polymorphisms in Shaping Human Altruism and Prosocial Behavior. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 45.0
  18. J. Manuel Torres (1997). On the Limits of Enhancement in Human Gene Transfer: Drawing the Line. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (1):43-53.score: 45.0
    Enhancement-line human genetic engineering has recurrently been targeted for bioethical discussion and is usually (if not always) illustrated by examples alluding to a genetic technology that is far beyond our current possibilities. By discussing an ambitious project related to solid tumor cancers – multidrug resistance (MDR) – the present paper places the question on a more realistic plane and draws bioethical conclusions to serve as guidelines in the field. The paper also establishes the inadequacy of the prevalent concept of (...)
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  19. Sara Goering (2000). Gene Therapies and the Pursuit of a Better Human. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (03):330-341.score: 42.0
    As a philosopher interested in biomedical ethics, I find recent advances in genetic technologies both fascinating and frightening. Future technologies for genetic therapies and elimination of clearly deleterious genes offer us the ability to get rid of the cause of much human suffering, seemingly at its physiological root. But memories of past eugenics programs gone horribly awry (whether we speak of Hitler's program, California sterilization laws and practices of the 1920s, or even contemporary practices, such as attempts to work (...)
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  20. Nils Holtug (1997). Altering Humans—The Case For and Against Human Gene Therapy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):157-174.score: 42.0
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  21. Ulrich Dettweiler & Perikles Simon (2001). Points to Consider for Ethics Committees in Human Gene Therapy Trials. Bioethics 15 (5-6):491-500.score: 42.0
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  22. Nancy S. Jecker & Andrea E. Glassberg (1997). The Ethics of Human Gene Therapy, by LeRoy Walters and Julie Gage Palmer. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. 209 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (04):494-.score: 42.0
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  23. Kathleen Cranley Glass (1999). LeRoy Walters and Julie Gage Palmer, the Ethics of Human Gene Therapy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (5):489-490.score: 42.0
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  24. Manuel A. F. V. Gonçalves (2005). A Concise Peer Into the Background, Initial Thoughts and Practices of Human Gene Therapy. Bioessays 27 (5):506-517.score: 42.0
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  25. R. P. Hamilton (1997). The Ethics of Human Gene Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):386-387.score: 42.0
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  26. Johann S. Ach, Susanne Ackerman, F. Terrence, Allan Adelman & Howard See Adelman (2003). Agich, George J., and Bethan J. Spielman. Ethics Expert Testimony: Against the Skeptics 22, 381. Agich, George J., and Royce P. Jones. The Logical Status of Brain Death Criteria 10, 387. Allison, David, and Mark D. Roberts. On Constructing the Disorder of Hysteria 19, 239. Anderson, W. French. Human Gene Therapy: Scientific and Ethical Considerations 10, 275. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 360:5310.score: 42.0
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  27. Ray Moseley, Lee Crandall & Marvin Dewar (1991). Ethical Implications of a Complete Human Gene Map for Insurance. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 10 (4):69-82.score: 42.0
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  28. Juan Manuel Torres (1997). On the Limits of Enhancement in Human Gene Transfer: Drawing the Line. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (1):43-53.score: 42.0
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  29. Leroy Walters (1990). Ethical Issues in Human Gene Therapy. Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (4):267-74.score: 42.0
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  30. LeRoy Walters (2000). The Oversight of Human Gene Transfer Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (2):171-174.score: 42.0
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  31. W. F. Anderson (forthcoming). Human Gene Therapy: Scientific Considerations'. Beauchamp, T. And Walters, L.: Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, Belmont, California: Wadsworth.score: 42.0
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  32. Mary Carrington Coutts (1994). Human Gene Therapy. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 4 (1):63-83.score: 42.0
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  33. Marvin Dewar (1991). Ethical Implications of a Complete Human Gene Map for Insurance. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 10 (4):69-82.score: 42.0
  34. Julian T. Forton & Dominic P. Kwiatkowski (2006). Searching for the Regulators of Human Gene Expression. Bioessays 28 (10):968-972.score: 42.0
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  35. Diego Gracia (2001). Ethics, Genetics, and Human Gene Therapy. In. In H. Ten Have & Bert Gordijn (eds.), Bioethics in a European Perspective. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 309--338.score: 42.0
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  36. Monkol Lek, Kate Gr Quinlan & Kathryn N. North (2010). The Evolution of Skeletal Muscle Performance: Gene Duplication and Divergence of Human Sarcomeric Α‐Actinins. Bioessays 32 (1):17-25.score: 42.0
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  37. Wentian Li (2012). Menzerath's Law at the Gene‐Exon Level in the Human Genome. Complexity 17 (4):49-53.score: 42.0
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  38. Juan Manuel Torres (1994). The Importance of Microevolutionary Tenets in the Debate on Germ-Line Human Gene Theraphy. Ludus Vitalis 2 (3):137-150.score: 42.0
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  39. Daniel J. Kevles (2009). Eugenics, the Genome, and Human Rights. Medicine Studies 1 (2):85-93.score: 39.7
    This article assesses the potential impact of current genomics research on human rights against the backdrop of the eugenics movement in the English-speaking world during first third of the twentieth century, The echo of eugenic interventions in societies far beyond Nazi Germany reverberates in the ethical debates triggered by the potential inherent in recent molecular biological developments. Mandatory eugenic restrictions of reproductive freedom seem less likely in countries committed to civil liberties than under authoritarian governments. More likely, consumer choice (...)
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  40. Hugh V. McLachlan (2005). Unique Persons and the Replicable Gene-Sets of Their Reproducible Bodies: A Defence of Human Cloning. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 11 (2).score: 39.0
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  41. Toni Samek (2007). Librarianship and Human Rights: A Twenty-First Century Guide. Chandos.score: 39.0
    Forward - Prefacio - Acknowledgments - Preface - About the author - Part One: the rhetoric - An urgent context for twenty-first century librarianship - Human rights, contestations and moral responsibilities of library and information workers - Part Two: the reality - Practical strategies for social action - Prevalent manifestations of social action applied to library and information work - Specific forms of social action used in library and information work for social change - Closing thought.
     
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  42. Eike-Henner W. Kluge (2003). Patenting Human Genes: When Economic Interests Trump Logic and Ethics. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 11 (2):119-130.score: 38.7
    To date, over 5,000 applications have been filed with United States Patent Office for patents on human genes. More than 1,500 of these applications have been granted. Other jurisdictions are experiencing a similar rush to mine and protect genomic gold. This paper argues that although many jurisdictions allow the patenting of human genes, this is ethically indefensible and amounts to an unjustified appropriation of a general human heritage. Economic and legal arguments in favour of patenting are considered (...)
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  43. Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman (2000). Niche Construction, Biological Evolution, and Cultural Change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):131-146.score: 36.0
    We propose a conceptual model that maps the causal pathways relating biological evolution to cultural change. It builds on conventional evolutionary theory by placing emphasis on the capacity of organisms to modify sources of natural selection in their environment (niche construction) and by broadening the evolutionary dynamic to incorporate ontogenetic and cultural processes. In this model, phenotypes have a much more active role in evolution than generally conceived. This sheds light on hominid evolution, on the evolution of culture, and on (...)
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  44. Walter Glannon (2001). Genes and Future People: Philosophical Issues in Human Genetics. Westview Press.score: 36.0
    Advances in genetic technology in general and medical genetics in particular will enable us to intervene in the process of human biological development which extends from zygotes and embryos to people. This will allow us to control to a great extent the identities and the length and quality of the lives of people who already exist, as well as those we bring into existence in the near and distant future. Genes and Future People explores two general philosophical questions, one (...)
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  45. Adam D. Moore (2000). Owning Genetic Information and Gene Enhancement Techniques: Why Privacy and Property Rights May Undermine Social Control of the Human Genome. Bioethics 14 (2):97–119.score: 36.0
  46. Guido Van Steendam, András Dinnyés, Jacques Mallet, Rolando Meloni, Carlos Romeo Casabona, Jorge Guerra González, Josef Kuře, Eörs Szathmáry, Jan Vorstenbosch, Péter Molnár, David Edbrooke, Judit Sándor, Ferenc Oberfrank, Ron Cole-Turner, István Hargittai, Beate Littig, Miltos Ladikas, Emilio Mordini, Hans E. Roosendaal, Maurizio Salvi, Balázs Gulyás & Diana Malpede (2006). Summary: The Budapest Meeting 2005 Intensified Networking on Ethics of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):415-420.score: 36.0
    This paper reports on the meeting of the Sounding Board of the EU Reprogenetics Project that was held in Budapest, Hungary, 6–9 November 2005. The Reprogenetics Project runs from 2004 until 2007 and has a brief to study the ethical aspects of human reproductive cloning and germline gene therapy. Discussions during The Budapest Meeting are reported in depth in this paper as well as the initiatives to involve the participating groups and others in ongoing collaborations with the goal (...)
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  47. Maurice A. M. de Wachter (1993). Ethical Aspects of Human Germ-Line Gene Therapy. Bioethics 7 (2-3):166-177.score: 36.0
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  48. Erik Parens (2000). David B. Resnik, Holly B. Steinkraus, and Pamela J. Langer, Human Germline Gene Therapy: Scientific, Moral and Political Issues. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (4):399-403.score: 36.0
  49. David B. Resnik (2011). Review of Gene Transfer and the Ethics of First-in-Human Research. [REVIEW] Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 5 (1).score: 36.0
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  50. R. Chadwick (2009). Gender And The Human Genome. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):10.score: 36.0
    _Gender issues arise in relation to the human genome across a number of dimensions: the level of attention given to the nuclear genome as opposed to the mitochondrial; the level of basic scientific research; decision-making in the clinic related to both reproductive decision-making on the one hand, and diagnostic and predictive testing on the other; and wider societal implications. Feminist bioethics offers a useful perspective for addressing these issues._.
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