Search results for 'Human geography Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. R. J. Johnston (1986). Philosophy and Human Geography: An Introduction to Contemporary Approaches. E. Arnold.score: 615.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Paul J. Cloke & R. J. Johnston (eds.) (2005). Spaces of Geographical Thought: Deconstructing Human Geography's Binaries. Sage Publications.score: 477.0
    Spaces of Geographical Thought examines key ideas – like space and place - which inform the geographic imagination. The text: discusses the core conceptual vocabulary of human geography: agency: structure; state: society; culture: economy; space: place; black: white; man: woman; nature: culture; local: global; and time: space; explains the significance of these binaries in the constitution of geographic thought; and shows how many of these binaries have been interrogated and re-imagined in more recent geographical thinking. A consideration of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Benno Werlen (1993). Society Action and Space: An Alternative Human Geography. Routledge.score: 471.0
    What is space? And why are questions of space important to social theory? Society, Action and Space is the first English translation of a book which has been widely recognized in Europe as a major contribution to the interface between geography and social theory. Benno Werlen focuses on the issues which are at the heart of the most important debates in human and social geography today. One of the most significant recent developments in social analysis has been (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. J. Pickles (1985). Phenomenology, Science, and Geography: Spatiality and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 441.0
    A work of outstanding originality and importance, which will become a cornerstone in the philosophy of geography, this book asks: What is human science? Is a truly human science of geography possible? What notions of spatiality adequately describe human spatial experience and behaviour? It sets out to answer these questions through a discussion of the nature of science in the human sciences, and, specifically, of the role of phenomenology in such inquiry. It criticises (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. R. J. Johnston (1991). A Question of Place: Exploring the Practice of Human Geography. Blackwell.score: 390.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Audrey Lynn Kobayashi & Suzanne Mackenzie (eds.) (1989). Remaking Human Geography. Unwin Hyman.score: 390.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.) (1989). Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 390.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. D. J. Walmsley (1984/1986). Human Geography: Behavioural Approaches. Wiley.score: 390.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert Inkpen (2005). Science, Philosophy and Physical Geography. Routledge.score: 351.0
    This accessible and engaging text explores the relationship between philosophy, science and physical geography. It addresses an imbalance that exists in opinion, teaching and to a lesser extent research, between a philosophically enriched human geography and a perceived philosophically ignorant physical geography. Science, Philosophy and Physical Geography , challenges the myth that there is a single self-evident scientific method, that can and is applied in a straightforward manner by physical geographers. It demonstrates the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Derek Gregory (1978/1979). Ideology, Science, and Human Geography. St. Martin's Press.score: 294.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Eliot Hurst & E. Michael (1981). Human and Inhuman Geography: An Autocritique--A Journey Through the Corridors of Positivism and the Collective Discovery of an Altogether Different Harmony. Geography Dept., University of New England.score: 264.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Iain Hay (1998). Making Moral Imaginations. Research Ethics, Pedagogy, and Professional Human Geography. Philosophy and Geography 1 (1):55 – 75.score: 246.0
    This paper exhorts geographers to become more active in debate about ethical research practice. It also suggests that ethical theory, practical problems, and lessons learned from postmodern thought make the prospects of establishing prescriptive codes of ethics unlikely. Instead, flexible prompts for moral contemplation might be used to encourage careful thought on matters of ethics. Because the practical feasibility of moral prompts rests on the existence of moral imaginations, it is vital to consider ways in which those imaginations might be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. David Sibley (1995). Geographies of Exclusion: Society and Difference in the West. Burns & Oates.score: 237.0
    Geographies of Exclusion identifies forms of social and spatial exclusion and subsequently examines the fate of knowledge of space and society which has been produced by members of excluded groups. Evaluating writing on urban society by women and black writers, David Sibley asks why such work is neglected by the academic establishment, suggesting that both the practices which result in the exclusion of minorities and those which result in the exclusion of knowledge have important implications for theory and method in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Francesca Bordogna (2008). William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.score: 234.0
    At Columbia University in 1906, William James gave a highly confrontational speech to the American Philosophical Association (APA). He ignored the technical philosophical questions the audience had gathered to discuss and instead addressed the topic of human energy. Tramping on the rules of academic decorum, James invoked the work of amateurs, read testimonials on the benefits of yoga and alcohol, and concluded by urging his listeners to take up this psychological and physiological problem. What was the goal of this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Roger Brunet (2011). Sustainable Geography. Wiley.score: 228.0
    Sustainable Geography recalls the system and laws of geographical space production, tackles the hardcore of geography and presents models and organizations through a regional analysis and the dynamics of territorial structures and methods. The book also describes the general idea of discontinuities, trenches, the anti-dialectical and redivision-uniformity in the globalization and addresses the Transnational Urban Systems and Urban Network in Europe.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Richard Brook Cathcart (1979). The Developing Artificial Geography of the Solar System. Vance Bibliographies.score: 225.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Paul Claval (1983). Models of Man in Geography. Dept. Of Geography, Syracuse University.score: 225.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David Ley (1980). Geography Without Man: A Humanistic Critique. School of Geography, University of Oxford.score: 225.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Seamus Grimes & Jaime Nubiola (1997). Reconsidering the Exclusion of Metaphysics in Human Geography. Acta Philosophica 6 (2):265-276.score: 224.0
    From the time of Descartes a strong tendency emerged to exclude the consideration of metaphysical questions as a necessary step towards developing truly scientific disciplines. Within human geography, positivism had a significant influence in moulding the discipline as "spatial science", resulting in a reductionist vision of humanity. Since the 1970s, in reaction to the limitations of this narrow vision and also to the deterministic perspective of marxism, humanistic approaches became important, but have failed to adequately deal with the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Paul J. Cloke (ed.) (2004). Practising Human Geography. Sage.score: 224.0
    Practising Human Geography is critical introduction to disciplinary debates about the practise of human geography, that is informed by an inquiry into how geographers actually do research. In examining those methods and practices that are integral to doing geography, the text presents a theoretically-informed reflection on the construction and interpretation of geographical data - including factual and ‘fictional’ sources; the use of core research methodologies; and the interpretative role of the researcher. Framed by an historical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Iain Hay (ed.) (2000). Qualitative Research Methods in Human Geography. Oxford University Press.score: 224.0
    This volume provides concise and accessible guidance on how to conduct qualitative research in human geography. It gives particular emphasis to examples drawn from social/cultural geography, perhaps the most vibrant area of inquiry in human geography over the past decade.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Phil Hubbard, Rob Kitchin & Gill Valentine (eds.) (2004). Key Thinkers on Space and Place. Sage.score: 222.0
    `It is a safe bet that Key Thinkers will emerge as something of a 'hit' within the undergraduate community and will rise to prominance as a 'must buy' -Environment and Planning `Key Thinkers on Space and Place is an engagingly written, well-researched and very accessible book. It will surely prove an invaluable tool for students, whom I would strongly encourage to purchase this edited collection as one of the best guides to recent geographical thought' -Claudio Minca, University of Newcastle `Key (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. R. J. Johnston (1989). Philosophy, Ideology and Geography. In Derek Gregory & Rex Walford (eds.), Horizons in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble Books. 48--66.score: 222.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Thomas Cushman (ed.) (2011). Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge.score: 219.0
  25. Arild Holt-Jensen (1999). Geography, History and Concepts: A Student's Guide. Sage Publications.score: 216.0
    Totally revised and updated, written especially for students, the third edition of Geography – History and Concepts is the definitive undergraduate introduction to the history, philosophy and methodology of Human Geography. Accessible and comprehensive, the work comprises five sections: - What is Geography?: a historical overview of the discipline and an explanation of its organization - The Foundations of Geography: examines Geography from Antiquity to the early modern period; the discussion includes detailed explanations (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. P. W. Daniels (ed.) (2001). Human Geography: Issues for the 21st Century. Prentice Hall.score: 202.0
    Machine generated contents note: SECTION 1 THE WORLD BEFORE GLOBALIZATION: CHANGING -- SCALES OF EXPERIENCE Edited by Denis Shaw -- Chapter 1 Pre-capitalist worlds Denis Shaw -- Chapter 2 The rise and spread of capitalism Terry Slater -- Chapter 3 The making of the twentieth-century world Denis Shaw -- SECTION 2 SOCIETY, SETTLEMENT AND CULTURE Edited by Denis Shaw -- Chapter 4 Cities Allan Cochrane -- Chapter 5 Rural alternatives Ian Bowler -- Chapter 6 Geography, culture and global change (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. John Eyles & David Marshall Smith (eds.) (1988). Qualitative Methods in Human Geography. Barnes & Noble.score: 196.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. M. G. Bradford (1977). Human Geography: Theories and Their Applications. Oxford University Press.score: 196.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Michael Chisholm (1975). Human Geography: Evolution or Revolution? Penguin.score: 196.0
  30. Michael Chisholm (1971). Research in Human Geography. London,Heinemann Educational.score: 196.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Keith Hoggart (2002). Researching Human Geography. Co-Published in the U.S.A. By Oxford University Press.score: 196.0
    This new text offers something different from the many "methods books" available. It presents the vast array of research methodologies available to those undertaking research on the topic, illustrating the principles, strengths, and weaknesses of all approaches. The book also demonstrates how individual philosophical approaches to research impose different preferences for research methodologies.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. David Mercer (1977). Conflict and Consensus in Human Geography. Dept. Of Geography, Monash University.score: 196.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Adam Etinson (2010). To Be or Not to Be: Charles Beitz on the Philosophy of Human Rights. Res Publica 16 (4):441-448.score: 192.0
    This is a review article of Charles Beitz's 2009 book on the philosophy of human rights, The Idea of Human Rights. The article provides a charitable overview of the book's main arguments, but also raises some doubts about the depth of the distinction between Beitz's 'practical' approach to humans rights and its 'naturalistic' counterparts.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 192.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Robert Mugerauer (1995). Interpreting Environments: Tradition, Deconstruction, Hermeneutics. University of Texas Press.score: 189.0
    Mugerauer seeks to make deconstruction and hermeneutics accessible to people in the environmental disciplines, including architecture, planning, urban studies, environmental studies, and cultural geography. Mugerauer demonstrates each methodology through a case study. The first study uses the traditional approach to recover the meaning of Jung's and Wittgenstein's houses by analyzing their historical, intentional contexts. The second case study utilizes deconstruction to explore Egyptian, French neoclassical, and postmodern attempts to use pyramids to constitute a sense of lasting presence. And the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Emma Sutton (2010). Book Review: Francesca Bordogna, William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science and the Geography of Knowledge. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2008. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):121-124.score: 189.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Thierry Paquot, Michel Lussault & Christiane Younès (eds.) (2007). Habiter, le Propre de L'Humain: Villes, Territoires Et Philosophie. La Découverte.score: 189.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.score: 182.0
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 182.0
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Georges Benko & Ulf Strohmayer (eds.) (1997). Space and Social Theory: Interpreting Modernity and Postmodernity. Blackwell Publishers.score: 180.0
    In this book, the world's leading spacial theorists provide new accounts of the central questions and issues in social-spacial theory with critical perspectives ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Dietrich Fliedner (2006). Processes Constitute Our Complex Reality: A Theoretical Investigation. Selbxtverlag der Fachrichtung Geographie der Universität des Saarlandes.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Dietrich Fliedner (1981). Society in Space and Time: An Attempt to Provide a Theoretical Foundation From an Historical Geographic Point of View. Selbstverlag des Geographischen Instituts Der Universität des Saarlandes.score: 180.0
  43. Martin Hampl (2000). Reality, Society and Geographical/Environmental Organization: Searching for an Integrated Order. Dept. Of Social Geography and Regional Development, Charles University of Prague, Faculty of Science.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. S. James & David Ley (eds.) (1993). Place/Culture/Representation. Routledge.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. David Morris (2006). The Open Figure of Experience and Mind: Review Essay of John Russon's Human Experience: Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life. Dialogue 45:315-326.score: 180.0
    This review of John Russon's Human Experience: Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life focuses on Russon's position that experience is open (having a developmental, situated and dynamic, rather than fixed, structure) and figured (having a structure inseparable from forms of bodily function), and that mind is something learned in the process of working out experience as figured and open. These themes are drawn together in relation to recent scientific discussions (e.g., of bodily dynamics, mirror neurons, robotic (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David Seamon & Robert Mugerauer (eds.) (1985/2000). Dwelling, Place, and Environment: Towards a Phenomenology of Person and World. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Silvio Tendler, Mílton Santos, Beth Goulart, Fernanda Montenegro, Matheus Nachtergaele, Milton Gonçalves, Osmar Prado, Zélia Duncan & Caique Botkay (eds.) (2006). O Mundo Global Visto Do Lado de Cá. Caliban Produções.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Benno Werlen (1995). Sozialgeographie Alltäglicher Regionalisierungen. F. Steiner.score: 180.0
    Bd. 1. Zur Ontologie von Gesellschaft und Raum -- Bd. 2. Globalisierung, Region und Regionalisierung -- Bd. 3. Ausgangspunkte und Befunde empirischer Forschung.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Alexandre Zabalza (2007). La Terre Et le Droit: Du Droit Civil à la Philosophie du Droit. Bière.score: 177.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. David Ludwig (2012). Language and Human Nature. Kurt Goldstein's Neurolinguistic Foundation of a Holistic Philosophy. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 48 (1):40-54.score: 176.0
1 — 50 / 1000