Search results for 'Human reproduction Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Beatrice Ioan & Vasile Astarastoae (2013). Ethical and Legal Aspects in Medically Assisted Human Reproduction in Romania. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 14 (2):4 - 13.score: 127.5
    Up to the present, there have not been any specific norms regarding medically assisted human reproduction in Romanian legislation. Due to this situation the general legislation regarding medical assistance (law no. 95/2006, regarding the Reform in Health Care System), the Penal and Civil law and the provisions of the Code of Deontology of the Romanian College of Physicians are applied to the field of medically assisted human reproduction. By analysing the ethical and legal conflicts regarding medically (...)
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  2. Gill Kirkup (ed.) (2000). The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University.score: 108.5
    The Gendered Cyborg brings together material from a variety of disciplines that analyze the relationship between gender and technoscience, and the way that this relationship is represented through ideas, language and visual imagery. The book opens with key feminist articles from the history and philosophy of science. They look at the ways that modern scientific thinking has constructed oppositional dualities such as objectivity/subjectivity, human/machine, nature/science, and male/female, and how these have constrained who can engage in science/technology and how they (...)
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  3. D. A. Ampofo (1994). The Health Issues of Human Reprodution [Sic] of Our Time: Philosophical Perspectives of Health and Social Problems of Procreation. Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences.score: 107.0
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  4. Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.score: 97.5
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  5. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 96.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects (...)
     
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  6. Lauren H. Seiler (2007). What Are We? The Social Construction of the Human Biological Self. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):243–277.score: 93.0
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  7. M. Simms (1995). Changing Human Reproduction: Social Science Perspectives. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):59-59.score: 87.8
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  8. Stephen Gill & Isabella Bakker (2006). New Constitutionalism and the Social Reproduction of Caring Institutions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (1):35-57.score: 87.0
    This essay analyzes neo-liberal economic agreements and legal and political frameworks or what has been called the “new constitutionalism,” a governance framework that empowers market forces to reshape economic and social development worldwide. The article highlights some consequences of new constitutionalism for caring institutions specifically, and for what feminists call social reproduction more generally: the biological reproduction of the species; the reproduction of labor power; and the reproduction of social institutions and processes associated (...)
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  9. Felix Martin (2011). Human Development and the Pursuit of the Common Good: Social Psychology or Aristotelian Virtue Ethics? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):89-98.score: 87.0
    The encyclical proclaims the centrality of human development, which includes acting with gratuitousness and solidarity in pursuing the common good. This paper considers first whether such relationships of gratuitousness and solidarity can be analysed through the prism of traditional theories of social psychology, which are highly influential in current management research, and concludes that certain aspects of those theories may offer useful tools for analysis at the practical level. This is contrasted with the analysis of such relationships (...)
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  10. L. Regan (1996). Ethical Aspects of Human Reproduction. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):368-368.score: 85.5
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  11. A. Cambron & Charles Susanne (1998). Regulation of Artificial Human Reproduction and European Social Regulations. Global Bioethics 97 (10):139-148.score: 85.5
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  12. Alan S. Parkes (1973). The Social Impact of Human Reproduction. Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (2).score: 85.5
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  13. Robert Snowden (1992). Beyond the Family: The Social Organisation of Human Reproduction. By A. F. Robertson. Pp. 231. (Polity Press, Oxford, 1991.) Price: £35.00 (Hardback), £10.95 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (2):282-283.score: 85.5
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  14. Kathryn Ehrich, Clare Williams & Bobbie Farsides (2010). Consenting Futures: Professional Views on Social, Clinical and Ethical Aspects of Information Feedback to Embryo Donors in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Clinical Ethics 5 (2):77-85.score: 84.0
    This paper reports from an ongoing multidisciplinary, ethnographic study that is exploring the views, values and practices (the ethical frameworks) drawn on by professional staff in assisted conception units and stem cell laboratories in relation to embryo donation for research purposes, particularly human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, in the UK. We focus here on the connection between possible incidental findings and the circumstances in which embryos are donated for hESC research, and report some of the uncertainties and dilemmas (...)
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  15. Christian Munthe (2003). The Use of Human Biobanks. Ethical, Social, Economical, and Legal Aspects: Edited by M G Hansson. Uppsala University, 2001, Free, Pp 93. ISBN 91-506-1472-X. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):123-a-123.score: 81.0
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  16. Mayra Gómez (2003). Human Rights in Cuba, El Salvador, and Nicaragua: A Sociological Perspective on Human Rights Abuse. Routledge.score: 79.5
    This book presents a historical perspective on patterns of human rights abuse in Cuba, El Salvador and Nicaragua and incorporates international relations in to the traditional theories of state repression found within the social sciences.
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  17. Nick Crossley (2001). The Social Body: Habit, Identity and Desire. Sage.score: 78.0
    This book explores both the embodied nature of social life and the social nature of human bodily life. It provides an accessible review of the contemporary social science debates on the body, and develops a coherent new perspective. Nick Crossley critically reviews the literature on mind and body, and also on the body and society. He draws on theoretical insights from the work of Gilbert Ryle, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, George Herbert Mead and Pierre Bourdieu, and shows how (...)
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  18. Evelyne Kiptot & Steven Franzel (2013). Voluntarism as an Investment in Human, Social and Financial Capital: Evidence From a Farmer-to-Farmer Extension Program in Kenya. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):1-13.score: 78.0
    A decline in public sector extension services in developing countries has led to an increasing emphasis on alternative extension approaches that are participatory, demand-driven, client-oriented, and farmer centered. One such approach is the volunteer farmer-trainer (VFT) approach, a form of farmer-to-farmer extension where VFTs host demonstration plots and share information on improved agricultural practices within their community. VFTs are trained by extension staff and they in turn train other farmers. A study was conducted to understand the rationale behind the decisions (...)
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  19. Toni Samek (2007). Librarianship and Human Rights: A Twenty-First Century Guide. Chandos.score: 78.0
    Forward - Prefacio - Acknowledgments - Preface - About the author - Part One: the rhetoric - An urgent context for twenty-first century librarianship - Human rights, contestations and moral responsibilities of library and information workers - Part Two: the reality - Practical strategies for social action - Prevalent manifestations of social action applied to library and information work - Specific forms of social action used in library and information work for social change - Closing (...)
     
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  20. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 77.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  21. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 77.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  22. Bertram F. Malle (2005). Folk Theory of Mind: Conceptual Foundations of Human Social Cognition. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 225-255.score: 75.0
    The human ability to represent, conceptualize, and reason about mind and behavior is one of the greatest achievements of human evolution and is made possible by a “folk theory of mind” — a sophisticated conceptual framework that relates different mental states to each other and connects them to behavior. This chapter examines the nature and elements of this framework and its central functions for social cognition. As a conceptual framework, the folk theory of mind operates prior to (...)
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  23. Wesley Cragg (2000). Human Rights and Business Ethics: Fashioning a New Social Contract. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):205 - 214.score: 75.0
    This paper argues that widely accepted understanding of the respective responsibilities of business and government in the post war industrialized world can be traced back to a tacit social contract that emerged following the second world war. The effect of this contract was to assign responsibility for generating wealth to business and responsibility for ensuring the equitable sharing of wealth to governments. Without question, this arrangement has resulted in substantial improvements in the quality of life in the industrialized world (...)
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  24. Lloyd Sandelands (2009). The Business of Business is the Human Person: Lessons From the Catholic Social Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):93 - 101.score: 75.0
    I describe an ethic for business administration based on the social tradition of the Catholic Church. I find that much current thinking about business falters for its conceit of truth. Abstractions such as the shareholder-value model contain truth - namely, that business is an economic enterprise to manage for the wealth of its owners. But, as in all abstractions, this truth comes at the expense of falsehood -namely, that persons are assets to deploy on behalf of owners. This last (...)
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  25. Kimberley Brownlee (2013). A Human Right Against Social Deprivation. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):199-222.score: 75.0
    Human rights debates neglect social rights. This paper defends one fundamentally important, but largely unacknowledged social human right. The right is both a condition for and a constitutive part of a minimally decent human life. Indeed, protection of this right is necessary to secure many less controversial human rights. The right in question is the human right against social deprivation. In this context, ‘social deprivation’ refers not to poverty, but to genuine, (...)
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  26. Ernst Fehr, Urs Fischbacher & Simon Gächter (2002). Strong Reciprocity, Human Cooperation, and the Enforcement of Social Norms. Human Nature 13 (1):1-25.score: 75.0
    This paper provides strong evidence challenging the self-interest assumption that dominates the behavioral sciences and much evolutionary thinking. The evidence indicates that many people have a tendency to voluntarily cooperate, if treated fairly, and to punish noncooperators. We call this behavioral propensity “strong reciprocity” and show empirically that it can lead to almost universal cooperation in circumstances in which purely self-interested behavior would cause a complete breakdown of cooperation. In addition, we show that people are willing to punish those who (...)
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  27. Graham Riches (1999). Advancing the Human Right to Food in Canada: Social Policy and the Politics of Hunger, Welfare, and Food Security. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):203-211.score: 75.0
    This article argues that hunger in Canada, while being an outcome of unemployment, low incomes, and inadequate welfare, springs also from the failure to recognize and implement the human right to food. Food security has, however, largely been ignored by progressive social policy analysis. Barriers standing in the way of achieving food security include the increasing commodification of welfare and the corporatization of food, the depoliticization of hunger by governments and the voluntary sector, and, most particularly, the neglect (...)
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  28. Desh Raj Sirswal (2012). Casteism, Social Security and Violation of Human Rights. In Manoj Kumar (ed.), Human Rights for All.score: 75.0
    The consciousness of social security comes to a man when he feels that he is getting his basic rights. Human Rights are related to those rights which are related to man’s life, freedom, equality and self-esteem, are established by Indian constitution or universal declaration of human rights and implemented by Indian judiciary system. In other words, “Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, (...)
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  29. Pascal Vrtička, David Sander & Patrik Vuilleumier (2012). Lateralized Interactive Social Content and Valence Processing Within the Human Amygdala. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:358-358.score: 75.0
    In the past, the amygdala has generally been conceptualized as a fear-processing module. Recently, however, it has been proposed to respond to all stimuli that are relevant with respect to the current needs, goals and values of an individual. This raises the question of whether the human amygdala may differentiate between separate kinds of relevance. A distinction between emotional (vs neutral) and social (vs nonsocial) relevance is supported by previous studies showing that the human amygdala preferentially responds (...)
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  30. P. Vrtička & P. Vuilleumier (2011). Neuroscience of Human Social Interactions and Adult Attachment Style. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:212-212.score: 75.0
    Since its first description four decades ago, attachment theory has become one of the principal developmental psychological frameworks for describing the role of individual differences in the establishment and maintenance of social bonds between people. Yet, still little is known about the neurobiological underpinnings of attachment orientations and their well-established impact on a range of social and affective behaviors. In the present review, we summarize data from recent studies using cognitive and imaging approaches to characterize attachment styles and (...)
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  31. D. B. Resnik (1998). The Commodification of Human Reproductive Materials. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):388-393.score: 74.0
    This essay develops a framework for thinking about the moral basis for the commodification of human reproductive materials. It argues that selling and buying gametes and genes is morally acceptable although there should not be a market for zygotes, embryos, or genomes. Also a market in gametes and genes should be regulated in order to address concerns about the adverse social consequences of commodification.
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  32. Stephen M. Fiore, Travis J. Wiltshire, Emilio J. C. Lobato, Florian G. Jentsch, Wesley H. Huang & Benjamin Axelrod (2013). Towards Understanding Social Cues and Signals in Human-Robot Interaction: Effects of Robot Gaze and Proxemic Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 4:859.score: 72.5
    As robots are increasingly deployed in settings requiring social interaction, research is needed to examine the social signals perceived by humans when robots display certain social cues. In this paper, we report a study designed to examine how humans interpret social cues exhibited by robots. We first provide a brief overview of perspectives from social cognition in humans and how these processes are applicable to human-robot interaction (HRI). We then discuss the need to examine (...)
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  33. Taru Vuontisjärvi (2006). Corporate Social Reporting in the European Context and Human Resource Disclosures: An Analysis of Finnish Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (4):331 - 354.score: 72.0
    This paper explores by means of content analysis the extent to which the Finnish biggest companies have adapted socially responsible reporting practices. The research focuses on Human Resource (HR) reporting and covers corporate annual reports. The criteria has been set on the basis of the analysis of the documents published at the European level in the context of corporate social responsibility (CSR), paying special attention to the European Council appeal on CSR in March 2000. As CSR is a (...)
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  34. David Bakhurst (1995). Social Being and the Human Essence: An Unresolved Issue in Soviet Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 47 (1-2):3-60.score: 72.0
    This is a transcription of a debate on the concept of a person conducted in Moscow in 1983. David Bakhurst argues that Evald Ilyenkov's social constructivist conception of personhood, founded on Marx's thesis that the human essence is the ensemble of social relations, is either false or trivially true. F. T. Mikhailov, V. S. Bibler, V. A. Lektorsky and V. V. Davydov critically assess Bakhurst's arguments, elucidate and contextualize Ilyenkov's views, and defend, in contrasting ways, the claim (...)
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  35. Fernando J. Fuentes-García, Julia M. Núñez-Tabales & Ricardo Veroz-Herradón (2008). Applicability of Corporate Social Responsibility to Human Resources Management: Perspective From Spain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):27 - 44.score: 72.0
    This article analyses the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility in relation to Human Resources (HR) management. Five potential tools are defined and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Finally, the implementation of the most advanced and powerful tool in this area is studied: the SA8000 standard.
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  36. Jean-Pierre Béland, Johane Patenaude, Georges Legault, Patrick Boissy & Monelle Parent (2011). The Social and Ethical Acceptability of NBICs for Purposes of Human Enhancement: Why Does the Debate Remain Mired in Impasse? [REVIEW] Nanoethics 5 (3):295-307.score: 72.0
    The emergence and development of convergent technologies for the purpose of improving human performance, including nanotechnology, biotechnology, information sciences, and cognitive science (NBICs), open up new horizons in the debates and moral arguments that must be engaged by philosophers who hope to take seriously the question of the ethical and social acceptability of these technologies. This article advances an analysis of the factors that contribute to confusion and discord on the topic, in order to help in understanding why (...)
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  37. Wilson Muoha Maina (2011). The Common Good and/or the Human Rights: Analysis of Some Papal Social Encyclicals and Their Contemporary Relevance. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (29):3-25.score: 72.0
    It is notable how some papal social encyclicals have interchangeably used the terms 'common good' and 'human rights.' This article analyzes the papal common good teaching and its contemporary shift to include human rights. I also explore the differential nuances between the common good and the human rights. Human rights as advocated by civil societies are understood as arising from a conception of the nature of the human person. The common good has been expressed (...)
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  38. Sandra Moog, Rob Stone & Ted Benton (eds.) (2009). Nature, Social Relations and Human Needs: Essays in Honour of Ted Benton. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 72.0
    Bringing together some of the most eminent thinkers in the field, this book celebrates the seminal contribution of Ted Benton to such pressing themes as: realism, naturalism and the philosophy of the social sciences, the continuing relevance of Marxism, philosophical anthropology and human needs, and ecology, society and natural limits.
     
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  39. Felix Rauner, Lauge Rasmussen & J. Martin Corbett (1988). The Social Shaping of Technology and Work: Human Centred CIM Systems. [REVIEW] AI and Society 2 (1):47-61.score: 72.0
    This paper decribes the theoretical and methodological issues involved in the social shaping of technology and work, with particular reference to human centred computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems. Conventional approaches to the understanding and shaping of the relationship between technology, work and human development are criticised, and an alternative, human centred approach is outlined. The methods and processes whereby the design of human centred CIM systems may be shaped and evaluated are then described and appraised.
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  40. Naomi R. Cahn (2012). The New Kinship: Constructing Donor-Conceived Families. New York University Press.score: 71.0
    Peopling the donor world -- The meaning of family in a changing world -- Creating families -- Creating communities across families -- The laws of the donor world: parents and children -- Law, adoption, and family secrets: disclosure and incest -- Reasons to regulate -- Regulating for connection -- Regulating for health and safety: setting limits in the gamete world -- Why not to regulate -- Conclusion: challenging and creating kinship.
     
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  41. Vittorio Cotesta (2012). Global Society and Human Rights. Brill.score: 70.5
    Knowledge transmission and universality of man in global society -- The other and the paradoxes of universalism -- Religion, human rights, and political conflicts -- Europe : common values and a common identity -- The public sphere and political space -- America and Europe : Carl Schmitt and Alexis de Tocqueville -- Identity and human rights : a glance at Europe from afar -- Human rights, universalism, and cosmopolitanism.
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  42. Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 70.5
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
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  43. Michael Ruse (2012). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 70.5
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements; 1. Evolutionary biology; 2. Human evolution; 3. Real science, good science?; 4. Progress; 5. Knowledge; 6. Morality; 7. Sex, orientation, and race; 8. From eugenics to medicine; Bibliography.
     
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  44. Roger Pierson & Raymond Stephanson (2010). Imagining Reproduction in Science and History. Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):1-9.score: 70.0
    Reproduction is at the core of many aspects of human existence. It is intrinsic in our biology and in the broad social constructs in which we all reside. The introduction to this special issue is designed to reflect on some of the differences between the humanities/arts and the sciences on the subject of Reproduction now and in the past. The intellectual/cultural distance between humanists and reproductive biologists is vast, yet communication between the Two Cultures has (...)
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  45. Jean V. McHale (2003). Nursing and Human Rights. Butterworth Heinemann.score: 69.0
    " This book focuses on the relationship between human rights and nursing in these changing times.
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  46. Georges Benko & Ulf Strohmayer (eds.) (1997). Space and Social Theory: Interpreting Modernity and Postmodernity. Blackwell Publishers.score: 69.0
    In this book, the world's leading spacial theorists provide new accounts of the central questions and issues in social-spacial theory with critical perspectives ...
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  47. John Barry (2007). Environment and Social Theory. Routledge.score: 69.0
    Environment and Social Theory provides a concise introduction to the relationship between the environment and social theory, both historically and within contemporary social theory.
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  48. Petya Puncheva-Michelotti, Marco Michelotti & Peter Gahan (2010). The Relationship Between Individuals' Recognition of Human Rights and Responses to Socially Responsible Companies: Evidence From Russia and Bulgaria. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):583 - 605.score: 69.0
    An emerging body of literature has highlighted a gap in our understanding of the extent to which the salience attached to human rights is likely to influence the extent to which an individual takes account of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in decision making. The primary aim of this study is to begin to address this gap by understanding how individuals attribute different emphasis on specific aspects of human rights when making decisions to purchase, work, invest or (...)
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  49. Yanna Vogiazou (2007). Design for Emergence: Collaborative Social Play with Online and Location-Based Media. Ios Press.score: 69.0
    In light of the fact that social dynamics and unexpected uses of technology can inspire innovation, this book proposes a research model of design for emergence, ...
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  50. Nigel Rapport (2012). Anyone, the Cosmopolitan Subject of Anthropology. Berghahn Books.score: 69.0
    This book argues for the importance of cosmopolitanism as a theory of human being, as a methodology for social science, and as a moral and political program.
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