Search results for 'Human reproduction Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Beatrice Ioan & Vasile Astarastoae (2008). Ethical and Legal Aspects in Medically Assisted Human Reproduction in Romania. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 14 (2):4-13.
    Up to the present, there have not been any specific norms regarding medically assisted human reproduction in Romanian legislation. Due to this situation the general legislation regarding medical assistance, the Penal and Civil law and the provisions of the Code of Deontology of the Romanian College of Physicians are applied to the field of medically assisted human reproduction. By analysing the ethical and legal conflicts regarding medically assisted human reproduction in Romania, some characteristics cannot (...)
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  2.  11
    M. Simms (1995). Changing Human Reproduction: Social Science Perspectives. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):59-59.
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  3.  28
    Lauren H. Seiler (2007). What Are We? The Social Construction of the Human Biological Self. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):243–277.
    This essay explores how the human biological self is socially constructed, and rejects various truisms that define our character. Rather than being stand-alone entities, the human biological self forms what biologists call “superorganisms” and what I call “poly-super-organisms.” Thus, along with prokaryotes , viruses, and other entities, we are combined in an inseparable menagerie of species that is spread across multiple bodies. Biologists claim that only males and females are organisms. As described here, however, human sperm and (...)
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  4.  2
    Robert Snowden (1992). Beyond the Family: The Social Organisation of Human Reproduction. By A. F. Robertson. Pp. 231. (Polity Press, Oxford, 1991.) Price: £35.00 (Hardback), £10.95 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (2):282-283.
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  5.  1
    A. Cambron & Charles Susanne (1998). Regulation of Artificial Human Reproduction and European Social Regulations. Global Bioethics 97 (10):139-148.
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  6.  1
    L. Regan (1996). Ethical Aspects of Human Reproduction. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):368-368.
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  7. Alan S. Parkes (1973). The Social Impact of Human Reproduction. Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (2):195.
  8. Wargacki (2002). Wolność Naturą I Prawem Człowieka, Indywidualny I Społeczny Wymiar Wolności [Freedom - A Human's Nature andOne's Right. The Individual and Social Aspects of Freedom]. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 7:260-262.
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  9.  27
    Gill Kirkup (ed.) (2000). The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University.
    The Gendered Cyborg brings together material from a variety of disciplines that analyze the relationship between gender and technoscience, and the way that this relationship is represented through ideas, language and visual imagery. The book opens with key feminist articles from the history and philosophy of science. They look at the ways that modern scientific thinking has constructed oppositional dualities such as objectivity/subjectivity, human/machine, nature/science, and male/female, and how these have constrained who can engage in science/technology and how they (...)
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  10.  31
    Kathryn Ehrich, Clare Williams & Bobbie Farsides (2010). Consenting Futures: Professional Views on Social, Clinical and Ethical Aspects of Information Feedback to Embryo Donors in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Clinical Ethics 5 (2):77-85.
    This paper reports from an ongoing multidisciplinary, ethnographic study that is exploring the views, values and practices (the ethical frameworks) drawn on by professional staff in assisted conception units and stem cell laboratories in relation to embryo donation for research purposes, particularly human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, in the UK. We focus here on the connection between possible incidental findings and the circumstances in which embryos are donated for hESC research, and report some of the uncertainties and dilemmas (...)
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  11.  2
    Tamara Petrovic-Trifunovic (2016). Between the Critical and the Engaged: On the Importance of Studying Symbolic Aspects of the Reproduction of Social Order. Filozofija I Društvo 27 (2):407-418.
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  12.  6
    Christian Munthe (2003). The Use of Human Biobanks. Ethical, Social, Economical, and Legal Aspects: Edited by M G Hansson. Uppsala University, 2001, Free, Pp 93. ISBN 91-506-1472-X. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):123-a-123.
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  13.  14
    Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  14. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects (...)
     
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  15. D. A. Ampofo (1994). The Health Issues of Human Reprodution [Sic] of Our Time: Philosophical Perspectives of Health and Social Problems of Procreation. Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences.
     
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  16.  25
    Felix Martin (2011). Human Development and the Pursuit of the Common Good: Social Psychology or Aristotelian Virtue Ethics? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):89-98.
    The encyclical proclaims the centrality of human development, which includes acting with gratuitousness and solidarity in pursuing the common good. This paper considers first whether such relationships of gratuitousness and solidarity can be analysed through the prism of traditional theories of social psychology, which are highly influential in current management research, and concludes that certain aspects of those theories may offer useful tools for analysis at the practical level. This is contrasted with the analysis of such relationships (...)
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  17.  47
    Stephen Gill & Isabella Bakker (2006). New Constitutionalism and the Social Reproduction of Caring Institutions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (1):35-57.
    This essay analyzes neo-liberal economic agreements and legal and political frameworks or what has been called the “new constitutionalism,” a governance framework that empowers market forces to reshape economic and social development worldwide. The article highlights some consequences of new constitutionalism for caring institutions specifically, and for what feminists call social reproduction more generally: the biological reproduction of the species; the reproduction of labor power; and the reproduction of social institutions and processes associated (...)
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  18.  13
    Peter Corning (2015). The Science of Human Nature and the Social Contract. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 11 (1):15-40.
    800x600 One of the most important political challenges of our time - indeed of all times - is social justice. It was first addressed as a philosophical issue in Plato's great dialogue, the _Republic_, and it has been a continuing theme in the "tradition of discourse" ever since. As I will argue, Plato's analysis and conclusions represent a sound foundation and a starting point for advancing a new social justice paradigm that is undergirded by the emerging, multi-disciplinary science (...)
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  19.  6
    Li Che-Hou (1974). The Objective and the Social Aspects of Beauty: Comments on the Aesthetics of Chu Kuang-Ch'ien and Ts'ai I. Contemporary Chinese Thought 6 (2):54-68.
    After reading the essays of Mr. Ts'ai and Mr. Chu, I have a few immature opinions. Generally speaking, I feel that in dealing with the errors of their opponents, both Ts'ai I in his criticism of Huang Yüeh-mien and Chu Kuang-ch'ien in his criticism of Ts'ai I are quite accurate and convincing. However, in presenting their own arguments of what is right, both of them are on shaky ground and in error. That is because in one way or another, consciously (...)
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  20.  17
    Simon V. Glynn (2014). Alfred Schutz, the Epistemology and Methodology of the Human and Social Sciences, and the Subjective Foundations of Objectivity. Schutzian Research 6:61-74.
    Long debated has been whether or not the “objectivistic” epistemologies, quantitative methods and causal explanations, developed by the natural sciences for the study of physical objects, their actions and interactions, might also be applied to the study of human subjects, their experiences, actions and social interactions. Pointing out that such supposedly objective approaches would be singularly inappropriate to the study of the significance or meanings, qualitative values and freedom of choice, widely regarded as essential aspects of (...) subjects, their experiences, actions, and social interactions, and drawing attention, a la Alfred Schutz, to the two meanings of the term “subjective” it is first argued that many of the claims of the natural sciences themselves are “empirically” unverifiable, in the Positivistic sense of that term. Moreover, and most crucially, it is further argued that the “objectivity” of an experience cannot be empirically established on the basis of its supposed correspondence to some “objective” world—for, as precisely appearance or experience transcending, the existence of such a world, much less its nature, is clearly empirically unverifiable—and must therefore rest upon inter-subjective coherence, which in turn must, as Schutz has pointed out, depend precisely upon the very subjective experiences which those who would council such an “objective” approach, had ipso facto, sought to avoid as unverifiable. Thus, paradoxically, the criterion of objective verification cannot itself be objectively verified, but rests upon appeals to “subjective” experiences. (shrink)
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  21. Gheorghe-Ilie Farte (2012). Some Libertarian Ideas About Human Social Life. Argumentum. Journal of the Seminar of Discursive Logic, Argumentation Theory and Rhetoric 10 (2):07-19.
    The central thesis of my article is that people live a life worthy of a human being only as self-ruling members of some autarchic (or self-governing) communities. On the one hand, nobody is born as a self-ruling individual, and on the other hand, everybody can become such a person by observing progressively the non-aggression principle and, ipso facto, by behaving as a moral being. A self-ruling person has no interest in controlling her neighbors, but in mastering his own impulses, (...)
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  22.  3
    Roger Pierson & Raymond Stephanson (2010). Imagining Reproduction in Science and History. Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):1-9.
    Reproduction is at the core of many aspects of human existence. It is intrinsic in our biology and in the broad social constructs in which we all reside. The introduction to this special issue is designed to reflect on some of the differences between the humanities/arts and the sciences on the subject of Reproduction now and in the past. The intellectual/cultural distance between humanists and reproductive biologists is vast, yet communication between the Two Cultures has (...)
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  23.  6
    J. M. Ziman (1981). Puzzles, Problems, and Enigmas: Occasional Pieces on the Human Aspects of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    A discussion of the human side of science, originally published in 1981.
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  24.  11
    Silvia Staub-Bernasconi (2011). Human Rights and Social Work: Philosophical and Ethical Reflections on a Possible Dialogue Between East Asia and the West. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):331-347.
    The ?West? is inclined to blame Asian countries, especially China, for its disrespect of human rights without looking at it's own record of human rights violations! This makes a fair dialogue very difficult till improbable. Social work on the international level can't avoid this dialogue if it wants to live up to its internationally consensual documents which all refer to human rights. The thesis of this article is, that it will only succeed, if it clarifies some (...)
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  25.  13
    Marvin Stauch (1992). Natural Science, Social Science, and Democratic Practice: Some Political Implications of the Distinction Between the Natural and the Human Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 22 (3):337-356.
    This article examines some of the contributions to the contemporary debate over the question of whether there is an important distinction to be made between the natural and the human sciences. In particular, the article looks at the arguments that Charles Taylor has put forward for the recognition of a radical discontinuity between these forms of science and then examines Richard Rorty's objections to Taylor's distinction and argues that Rorty misunderstands the reasons for this distinction and thereby misses the (...)
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  26.  26
    Ragnar Rommetveit (1987). Meaning, Context, and Control:Convergent Trends and Controversial Issues in Current Social-Scientific Research on Human Cognition and Communication. Inquiry 30 (1 & 2):77 – 99.
    A survey of a wide range of social?scientific disciplines reveals a definite convergence of theoretical interest in human cognition and communication as situated, concerned, and embedded in social commitment. Recent contributions within situation semantics and cognitive science explicitly reject some of the constraints inherent in their shared philosophical heritage and prepare novel ground for dialogues between fields as far apart as formal semantics and ?dialogical? text theory. Issues such as purely cognitive versus motivational aspects of (...) situatedness, and the relationship between models of individual information processing, on the one hand, and hermeneutic?dialectic assumptions about social and collective features of meaning and mind, on the other, are thus made topics of cross?disciplinary discussions. These are some of the many problems in need of further clarification if we want to explore the possibility of bridging and/or transcending the gulf between analytic?rationalist and hermeneutic?dialectic contributions to our insight into human cognition and communication. (shrink)
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  27.  8
    Patrizia Calefato (2009). Language in Social Reproduction. Sign Systems Studies 37 (1-2):43-80.
    This paper focuses on the semiotic foundations of sociolinguistics. Starting from the definition of “sociolinguistics” given by the philosopher Adam Schaff, the paper examines in particular the notion of “critical sociolinguistics” as theorized by the Italian semiotician Ferruccio Rossi-Landi. The basis of the social dimension of language are to be found in what Rossi-Landi calls “social reproduction” which regards both verbal and non-verbal signs. Saussure’s notionof langue can be considered in this way, with reference not only to (...)
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  28.  5
    Vasil Gluchman (2008). Human Dignity and its Non-Utilitarian Consequentialist Aspects. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:127-133.
    According to author, value of human dignity has its place in his ethics of social consequences which is a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism. This is so because it is compatible with the value of positive consequences that creates one of the crucial criteria in ethics of social consequences. There exist two aspects of human dignity in this ethical theory. The first is related to the value of life that is worthy of esteem and respect, which (...)
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  29.  7
    Kostas Kampourakis & William McComas (2010). Charles Darwin and Evolution: Illustrating Human Aspects of Science. [REVIEW] Science and Education 19 (6-8):637-654.
    Recently, the nature of science (NOS) has become recognized as an important element within the K-12 science curriculum. Despite differences in the ultimate lists of recommended aspects, a consensus is emerging on what specific NOS elements should be the focus of science instruction and inform textbook writers and curriculum developers. In this article, we suggest a contextualized, explicit approach addressing one core NOS aspect: the human aspects of science that include the domains of creativity, social influences (...)
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  30. Anabela Sarmento (ed.) (2011). Sociological and Philosophical Aspects of Human Interaction with Technology: Advancing Concepts. Information Science Reference.
     
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  31.  49
    Nick Crossley (2001). The Social Body: Habit, Identity and Desire. Sage.
    This book explores both the embodied nature of social life and the social nature of human bodily life. It provides an accessible review of the contemporary social science debates on the body, and develops a coherent new perspective. Nick Crossley critically reviews the literature on mind and body, and also on the body and society. He draws on theoretical insights from the work of Gilbert Ryle, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, George Herbert Mead and Pierre Bourdieu, and shows how (...)
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  32.  39
    Mayra Gómez (2003). Human Rights in Cuba, El Salvador, and Nicaragua: A Sociological Perspective on Human Rights Abuse. Routledge.
    This book presents a historical perspective on patterns of human rights abuse in Cuba, El Salvador and Nicaragua and incorporates international relations in to the traditional theories of state repression found within the social sciences.
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  33. Robert T. Bower (1978). Ethics in Social Research: Protecting the Interests of Human Subjects. Praeger Publishers.
     
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  34. Toni Samek (2007). Librarianship and Human Rights: A Twenty-First Century Guide. Chandos.
    Forward - Prefacio - Acknowledgments - Preface - About the author - Part One: the rhetoric - An urgent context for twenty-first century librarianship - Human rights, contestations and moral responsibilities of library and information workers - Part Two: the reality - Practical strategies for social action - Prevalent manifestations of social action applied to library and information work - Specific forms of social action used in library and information work for social change - Closing (...)
     
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  35. Rosalyn Diprose (1994). The Bodies of Women: Ethics, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    In The Bodies of Women , Rosalyn Diprose argues that traditional approaches to ethics both perpetuate and remain blind to the mechanisms of the subordination of women. She shows that injustice against women begins in the ways that social discourses and practices place women's embodied existence as improper and secondary to men. She intervenes into debates about sexual difference, ethics, philosophies of the body and theories of self in order to develop a new ethics which places sexual difference at (...)
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  36.  10
    Giuseppe Lugano (2010). Do Only Computers Scale? On the Cognitive and Social Aspects of Scalability. Encyclopaideia 14 (28):89-110.
    La scalabilità è una proprietà desiderabile di sistemi informatici associata a metriche di performance. Più precisamente, un sistema è definito scalabile quando riesce a gestire, senza calo di prestazioni, un numero crescente di elementi, processi, quantità di lavoro e/o quando può essere espanso a piacimento. Progettare un sistema scalabile garantisce un’ottimizzazione dei costi e delle prestazioni, e della produttività di un’azienda. Questi scopi sono stati perseguiti, dagli anni Ottanta, attraverso numerosi studi sulla scalabilità, che sono stati sviluppati in un ambito (...)
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  37.  5
    Scott Gelfand & John R. Shook (2006). Ectogenesis: Artificial Womb Technology and the Future of Human Reproduction. Rodopi.
    This book raises many moral, legal, social, and political, questions related to possible development, in the near future, of an artificial womb for human use. Is ectogenesis ever morally permissible? If so, under what circumstances? Will ectogenesis enhance or diminish women's reproductive rights and/or their economic opportunities? These are some of the difficult and crucial questions this anthology addresses and attempts to answer.
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  38.  19
    Michael Ruse (2012). The Philosophy of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.
    1. Evolutionary biology -- 2. Human evolution -- 3. Real science? Good science? -- 4. Progress -- 5. Knowledge -- 6. Morality -- 7. Sex, orientation, and race -- 8. From eugenics to medicine.
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  39.  8
    Margaret Alston (2004). Who is Down on the Farm? Social Aspects of Australian Agriculture in the 21st Century. Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):37-46.
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  40.  9
    Vittorio Cotesta (2012). Global Society and Human Rights. Brill.
    Knowledge transmission and universality of man in global society -- The other and the paradoxes of universalism -- Religion, human rights, and political conflicts -- Europe : common values and a common identity -- The public sphere and political space -- America and Europe : Carl Schmitt and Alexis de Tocqueville -- Identity and human rights : a glance at Europe from afar -- Human rights, universalism, and cosmopolitanism.
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  41. Michael Ruse (2012). Human Evolution: A Philosophical Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements; 1. Evolutionary biology; 2. Human evolution; 3. Real science, good science?; 4. Progress; 5. Knowledge; 6. Morality; 7. Sex, orientation, and race; 8. From eugenics to medicine; Bibliography.
     
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  42.  20
    John Barry (2007). Environment and Social Theory. Routledge.
    Environment and Social Theory provides a concise introduction to the relationship between the environment and social theory, both historically and within contemporary social theory.
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  43. John K. Roth (ed.) (2005). Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Genocide is evil or nothing could be. It raises a host of questions about humanity, rights, justice, and reality, which are key areas of concern for philosophy. Strangely, however, philosophers have tended to ignore genocide. Even more problematic, philosophy and philosophers bear more responsibility for genocide than they have usually admitted. In Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide, an international group of twenty-five contemporary philosophers work to correct those deficiencies by showing how philosophy can and should repsond to (...)
     
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  44.  58
    Georges Benko & Ulf Strohmayer (eds.) (1997). Space and Social Theory: Interpreting Modernity and Postmodernity. Blackwell Publishers.
    In this book, the world's leading spacial theorists provide new accounts of the central questions and issues in social-spacial theory with critical perspectives ...
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  45.  28
    Jean V. McHale (2003). Nursing and Human Rights. Butterworth Heinemann.
    " This book focuses on the relationship between human rights and nursing in these changing times.
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  46.  8
    Yanna Vogiazou (2007). Design for Emergence: Collaborative Social Play with Online and Location-Based Media. Ios Press.
    In light of the fact that social dynamics and unexpected uses of technology can inspire innovation, this book proposes a research model of design for emergence, ...
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  47. Sarah Banks (2004). Ethics, Accountability, and the Social Professions. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book explores the far-reaching ethical implications of recent changes in the organization and practice of the social professions, including social work, community and youth work. Drawing on moral philosophy, professional ethics and new empirical research, the author explores such questions as: * Can any occupation justifiably claim a special set of ethics? * What is the impact of the new 'ethics of distrust' on the autonomy discretion and creativity of practitioners? * How does inter-professional working challenge conceptions (...)
     
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  48. Rodney Taylor (2010). Human Biotechnology as Social Challenge: An Interdisciplinary Introduction to Bioethics. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 14 (1):40.
     
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  49.  1
    G. Badura-Lotter (2001). Ethical, Biological and Legal Aspects in the Use of Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Germany. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 7 (2):38.
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  50.  8
    Pheng Cheah (2006). Inhuman Conditions: On Cosmopolitanism and Human Rights. Harvard University Press.
    To such sanguine expectations, Pheng Cheah responds deftly with a sobering account of how the "inhuman" imperatives of capitalism and technology are ...
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