Search results for 'Human reproductive technology Law and legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susan L. Crockin (2010). Legal Conceptions: The Evolving Law and Policy of Assisted Reproductive Technologies. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Embryo litigation -- Access to ART treatment : insurance and discrimination -- General professional liability litigation -- Paternity and donor insemination -- Maternity and egg donation -- Traditional and gestational surrogacy arrangements -- Posthumous reproduction : access and parentage -- Same-sex parentage and ART -- Genetics (PGD) and ART -- ART-related embryonic stem cell legal developments -- ART-related adoption litigation -- ART-related fetal litigation and abortion-related litigation.
     
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  2.  17
    D. Brian Scarnecchia (2010). Bioethics, Law, and Human Life Issues: A Catholic Perspective on Marriage, Family, Contraception, Abortion, Reproductive Technology, and Death and Dying. Scarecrow Press.
    Introduction -- Rational anthropology and the difference between persons and animals -- Human freedom and conscience -- The three moral determinants and doubts of conscience -- The principle of double effect and consequentialism -- Cooperation and scandal -- Virtues--natural and supernatural -- Sin and grace -- Revelation -- Reproductive technologies -- Homosexuality and same-sex marriage -- Contraception -- Abortion -- Marriage and family -- End of life issues -- Appendix A : Summary of Evangelium Vitae -- Appendix B (...)
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  3. William E. May (2013). Bioethics, Law, and Human Life Issues: A Catholic Perspective on Marriage, Family, Contraception, Abortion, Reproductive Technology, Death and Dying by D. Brian Scarnecchia. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13 (2):377-380.
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  4.  19
    Marie Thérèse Meulders-Klein, Ruth Deech & P. Vlaardingerbroek (eds.) (2002). Biomedicine, the Family, and Human Rights. Kluwer Law International.
    This volume examines the impact of advances in genetics and assisted reproduction technologies on family law, human rights and the rights of the child, ...
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  5. Thérèse Murphy (ed.) (2009). New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
    The first IVF baby was born in the 1970s. Less than 20 years later, we had cloning and GM food, and information and communication technologies had transformed everyday life. In 2000, the human genome was sequenced. More recently, there has been much discussion of the economic and social benefits of nanotechnology, and synthetic biology has also been generating controversy. This important volume is a timely contribution to increasing calls for regulation - or better regulation - of these and other (...)
     
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  6. Rosamund Scott (2007). Choosing Between Possible Lives: Law and Ethics of Prenatal and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Hart.
  7. John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.) (2006). Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Pub..
  8. Romeo Casabona, Carlos María & Juliane Fernandes Queiroz (eds.) (2005). Biotecnologia E Suas Implicações Ético-Jurídicas. Del Rey.
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  9. Albin Eser, Hans-Georg Koch & Carola Seith (eds.) (2007). Internationale Perspektiven Zu Status Und Schutz des Extrakorporalen Embryos: Rechtliche Regelungen Und Stand der Debatte Im Ausland = International Perspectives on the Status and Protection of the Extracorporeal Embryo. Nomos.
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  10. Brigitte Feuillet-Liger (ed.) (2008). Procréation Médicalement Assistée Et Anonymat, Panorama International. Bruylant.
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  11. Minou Bernadette Friele (2008). Rechtsethik der Embryonenforschung: Rechtsharmonisierung in Moralisch Umstrittenen Bereichen. Mentis.
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  12. Eijirō Kuzuu (2004). Inochi No Hō to Rinri. Hōritsu Bunkasha.
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  13. Gérard Teboul (ed.) (2004). Procréation Et Droits de L'Enfant: Actes des Rencontres Internationales Organisées les 16, 17 Et 18 Septembre 2003 à Marseille Par l'Observatoire International du Droit de la Bioéthique Et de la Médecine [Sic]. [REVIEW] Nemesis.
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  14. Ana Cláudia Brandão de Barros Correia Ferraz (2009). Reprodução Humana Assistida E Suas Consequências Nas Relações de Família: A Filiação E a Origem Genética Sob a Perspectiva da Repersonalização. Juruá Editora.
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  15.  75
    Mohd Shuhaimi Bin Ishak & Sayed Sikandar Shah Haneef (2014). Reproductive Technology: A Critical Analysis of Theological Responses in Christianity and Islam. Zygon 49 (2):396-413.
    Reproductive medical technology has revolutionized the natural order of human procreation. Accordingly, some have celebrated its advent as a new and liberating determinant of kinship at the global level and advocate it as a right to reproductive health while others have frowned upon it as a vehicle for “guiltless exchange of sexual fluid” and commodification of human gametes. Religious voices from both Christianity and Islam range from unthinking adoption to restrictive use. While utilizing this (...) to enable the married couple to have children through the use of their own sexual material is welcome, the use of third party, surrogacy, and reproductive cloning are not in keeping with the sacrosanct principles of kinship, procreation through licit sexual intercourse, and social cohesiveness for building a cohesive family as uphold by both Christianity and Islam. To examine such larger issues emanating from these new ways of human procreation, beyond the question of legality, is a point which legal scholars in both Christianity and Islam, when issuing religious decrees, have not anticipated sufficiently. The article proposes to be an attempt to that end through a qualitative critical content analysis of selected literature written on the subject. (shrink)
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  16. T. Patrick Hill (2002). Reproductive Technologies Confront Traditional Ethics: The Capacity of Richard A. Mccormick's Reformulated Natural Law Ethic to Meet the Challenge. Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    Given modern technology's penetration of human behavior, it is reasonable to consider what this might mean ethically in the case of emerging technologies being used in association with human reproduction. The nature and reach of these technologies are unprecedented and can legitimately be said to pose serious challenges to traditional ethical assessments of the human good. ;In addressing these challenges, Richard A. McCormick, a moral theologian and bio-ethicist, has deployed a reformulated natural law ethic that derives (...)
     
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  17.  15
    D. Elsner (2006). Just Another Reproductive Technology? The Ethics of Human Reproductive Cloning as an Experimental Medical Procedure. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):596-600.
    Human reproductive cloning has not yet resulted in any live births. There has been widespread condemnation of the practice in both the scientific world and the public sphere, and many countries explicitly outlaw the practice. Concerns about the procedure range from uncertainties about its physical safety to questions about the psychological well-being of clones. Yet, key aspects such as the philosophical implications of harm to future entities and a comparison with established reproductive technologies such as in vitro (...)
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  18. Patrick Guinan, Francis Cardinal George, Jean Bethke Elshtain, John M. Haas, Steven Bozza, Daniel P. Toma, Patrick Lee, William E. May, Richard M. Doerflinger & Gerard V. Bradley (2003). Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology. Upa.
    The March 2002 symposium Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology brought together philosophers, theologians, scientists, lawyers, and scholars from across the United States. The essays of this book are the contributions of the symposium's participants.
     
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  19. Nicholas C. Lund-Molfese & Michael L. Kelly (eds.) (2003). Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology. Upa.
    The March 2002 symposium Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology brought together philosophers, theologians, scientists, lawyers, and scholars from across the United States. The essays of this book are the contributions of the symposium's participants.
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  20. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Clarendon Press.
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving health care provision and legal protection for women around the world. This is an authoritative and much-needed introduction to and defence of the concept of reproductive health, which though internationally endorsed, is still contested. The authors are leading authorities on reproductive medicine, women's health, human rights, medical law, and bioethics. They integrate their disciplines to provide an accessible but comprehensive picture. They analyse 15 (...)
     
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  21. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving health care provision and legal protection for women around the world. Here now is an authoritative and much-needed introduction to and defence of the concept that, though internationally endorsed, is still contested by conservative agencies. The authors are leading authorities on reproductive medicine, women's health, human rights, medical law, and bioethics: they integrate their disciplines to provide an accessible but comprehensive picture. They analyse cases (...)
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  22. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving health care provision and legal protection for women around the world. Here now is an authoritative and much-needed introduction to and defence of the concept that, though internationally endorsed, is still contested by conservative agencies. The authors are leading authorities on reproductive medicine, women's health, human rights, medical law, and bioethics: they integrate their disciplines to provide an accessible but comprehensive picture. They analyse cases (...)
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  23. Mireille Hildebrandt & Antoinette Rouvroy (eds.) (2011). Law, Human Agency, and Autonomic Computing: The Philosophy of Law Meets the Philosophy of Technology. Routledge.
     
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  24. M. Hildebrandt & Antoinette Rouvroy (eds.) (2011). The Philosophy of Law Meets the Philosophy of Technology: Autonomic Computing and Transformations of Human Agency. Routledge.
     
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  25. Judit Sándor & Violeta Beširević (eds.) (2009). Perfect Copy?: Law and Ethics of Reproductive Medicine. Cenger for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine.
     
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  26.  23
    Carlo Casonato (ed.) (2007). Life, Technology, and Law: Second Forum for Transnational and Comparative Legal Dialogue, Levico Terme, Italy, June 9-10, 2006: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Cedam.
  27. Judit Sándor & Violeta Beširević (eds.) (2009). Perfect Copy?: Law and Ethics of Reproductive Medicine. Center for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine.
     
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  28. Zelman Cowen (1985). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.
     
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  29.  27
    Lee M. Silver (1990). New Reproductive Technologies in the Treatment of Human Infertility and Genetic Disease. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).
    In this paper I will discuss three areas in which advances in human reproductive technology could occur, their uses and abuses, and their effects on society. First is the potential to drastically increase the success rate and availability of in vitro fertilization and embryo freezing. Second is the ability to perform biopsies on embryos prior to the onset of pregnancy. Finally, I will consider the adding or altering of genes in embryos, commonly referred to as genetic engineering.As (...)
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  30.  16
    L. Bernier (2004). Reproductive and Therapeutic Cloning, Germline Therapy, and Purchase of Gametes and Embryos: Comments on Canadian Legislation Governing Reproduction Technologies. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):527-532.
    In Canada, the Assisted Human Reproduction Act received royal assent on 29 March 2004. The approach proposed by the federal government responds to Canadians’ strong desire for an enforceable legislative framework in the field of reproduction technologies through criminal law. As a result of the widening gap between the rapid pace of technological change and governing legislation, a distinct need was perceived to create a regulatory framework to guide decisions regarding reproductive technologies.In this article the three main (...)
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  31. Naomi R. Cahn (2012). The New Kinship: Constructing Donor-Conceived Families. New York University Press.
    Peopling the donor world -- The meaning of family in a changing world -- Creating families -- Creating communities across families -- The laws of the donor world: parents and children -- Law, adoption, and family secrets: disclosure and incest -- Reasons to regulate -- Regulating for connection -- Regulating for health and safety: setting limits in the gamete world -- Why not to regulate -- Conclusion: challenging and creating kinship.
     
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  32.  9
    Lucinda Vandervort (2006). Reproductive Choice: Screening Policy and Access to the Means of Reproduction. Human Rights Quarterly 28 (2):438-464.
    The practice of screening potential users of reproductive services is of profound social and political significance. Access screening is inconsistent with the principles of equality and self-determination, and violates individual and group human rights. Communities that strive to function in accord with those principles should not permit access screening, even screening that purports to be a benign exercise of professional discretion. Because reproductive choice is controversial, regulation by law may be required in most jurisdictions to provide effective (...)
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  33.  5
    Angela Ballantyne, Belinda Bennett, Véronique Bergeron & Diana Buccafurni (2008). Richard E. Ashcroft is Professor of Bioethics in the School of Law at Queen Mary, at the University of London. He has Published Widely on Ethical Issues in Medical Research and in Public Health. His Current Research is on Bioethics and Human Rights and Equality and Difference in Reproductive Rights. [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2).
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  34. Junxin Kang (2009). Sheng Ming Xing Fa Yuan Li. Yuan Zhao Chu Ban You Xian Gong Si.
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  35. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects (...)
     
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  36.  9
    Doris J. Baker & Mary A. Paterson (1994). Distributive Justice and the Regulation of Fertility Centers: An Analysis of the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (3):383.
    The right to conceive and bear children has been protected both in law and in policy. Human society has from its earliest time valued children and defended procreation as a basic right.Modern health technology offers the possibility of conception to the estimated 2.5 million infertile couples who may wish to have children. For these persons, infertility treatment offers the hope of having children, an activity deemed basic and essential in human society.In general, the state has been reluctant (...)
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  37.  11
    Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2009). Assisted Reproductive Technology in Spain: Considering Women's Interests. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (3):228.
    It might come as a surprise to many that Spain, a country with a strong Catholic tradition that officially banned contraceptive technologies until 1978, has some of the most liberal regulations in assisted reproduction in the world. Law No. 35/1988 was one of the first and most detailed acts of legislation undertaken on the subject of assisted-conception procedures. Indeed, not only did the law permit research on nonviable embryos, it made assisted reproductive technologies available to any woman, whether (...)
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  38. Robert G. Lee & Derek Morgan (2001). Human Fertilisation and Embryology: Regulating the Reproductive Revolution. Blackstone Press.
    Based on the "Guide to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990", this volume reviews the regulation of assisted conception including complex moral issues such as abortion, embryo research and cloning.
     
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  39.  20
    Jennifer Parks (2009). Rethinking Radical Politics in the Context of Assisted Reproductive Technology. Bioethics 23 (1):20-27.
    Radical feminists have argued for both the radical potential of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and its oppressive and damaging effects for women. This paper will address the question of what constitutes a radical feminist position on ART; I will argue that the very debate over whether ART liberates or oppresses women is misguided, and that instead the issue should be understood dialectically. Reproductive technologies are neither inherently liberating nor entirely oppressive: we can only understand the potential and (...)
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  40.  11
    Anna Smajdor (2014). How Useful is the Concept of the ‘Harm Threshold’ in Reproductive Ethics and Law? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):321-336.
    In his book Reasons and Persons, Derek Parfit suggests that people are not harmed by being conceived with a disease or disability if they could not have existed without suffering that particular condition. He nevertheless contends that entities can be harmed if the suffering they experience is sufficiently severe. By implication, there is a threshold which divides harmful from non-harmful conceptions. The assumption that such a threshold exists has come to play a part in UK policy making. I argue that (...)
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  41.  16
    Roger Brownsword, W. R. Cornish & Margaret Llewelyn (eds.) (1998). Law and Human Genetics: Regulating a Revolution. Hart Pub..
    This special issue of the Modern Law Review addresses a range of key issues - conceptual, ethical, political and practical - arising from the regulatory ...
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  42.  12
    David W. Meyers (2006). The Human Body and the Law: A Medico-Legal Study. Aldine Transaction.
    Thus, Meyers provides a valuable account, not only of current medical attitudes, but also of relevant case and statute law as it stands at present.
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  43.  11
    Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
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  44.  7
    Julie McCandless & Sally Sheldon (2010). “No Father Required”? The Welfare Assessment in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008. Feminist Legal Studies 18 (3):201-225.
    Of all the changes to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 that were introduced in 2008 by legislation of the same name, foremost to excite media attention and popular controversy was the amendment of the so-called welfare clause. This clause forms part of the licensing conditions which must be met by any clinic before offering those treatment services covered by the legislation. The 2008 Act deleted the statutory requirement that clinicians consider the need for a father (...)
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  45.  16
    David W. Meyers (1990). The Human Body and the Law. Stanford University Press.
    Mother and Fetus: Rights in Conflict A. INTRODUCTION After fertilization of the female egg (ovum) with male sperm the resulting zygote may implant ...
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  46. García San José & I. Daniel (2010). International Bio Law: An International Overview of Developments in Human Embryo Research and Experimentation. Ediciones Laborum.
     
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  47.  4
    Jacqueline A. Laing (2008). Inter-Species Embryos and Human Clones: Issues of Free Movement and Gestation. European Journal of Health Law 15: 421-431.
    The United Kingdom's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill, introduced into Parliament on the 8th of November 2007 contains a number of controversial proposals inter alia expressly permitting the creation of inter-species embryos for research and destruction and increasing the scope for human cloning also for destructive research. It is supposed that there ought not to be a blanket ban on the creation of human clones, hybrids, cybrids and chimeras because these embryos are valuable for research purposes. The (...)
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  48. Hans Morten Haugen (2012). Technology and Human Rights, Friends or Foes?: Highlighting Innovations Applying to Natural Resources and Medicine. Rol.
     
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  49.  24
    Serap Sahinoglu & Nuket Buken (2010). Gender, Infertility, Motherhood, and Assisted Reproductive Technology in Turkey. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (2):218-232.
    In Turkey, as in many other countries, infertility is generally regarded as a negative phenomenon in a woman’s life and is associated with a lot of stigma by society. In other words, female infertility and having a baby using Assisted Reproductive Technologies have to be taken into consideration with respect to gender, motherhood, social factors, religion and law. Yet if a woman chooses to use ART she has to deal with the consequences of her decision, such as being ostracized (...)
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  50.  30
    Janet Malek (2006). Identity, Harm, and the Ethics of Reproductive Technology. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (1):83 – 95.
    The controversial question of whether a future child can be harmed by the use of reproductive technology turns on the way that the future child's identity is understood. As a result, analysis of the ethical and legal obligations to the children of reproductive technology that are based upon the possibility of such harm depends upon the conception of identity that is used. This paper reviews the contributions of two recent books, David DeGrazia's Human Identity and (...)
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