Search results for 'Human rights Cross-cultural studies' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael C. Davis (ed.) (1995). Human Rights and Chinese Values: Legal, Philosophical, and Political Perspectives. Oxford University Press.score: 1119.0
    In March 1993, in preparation for the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, representatives from the states of Asia gathered in Bangkok to formulate their position on this emotive issue. The result of their discussions was the Bangkok declaration. They accepted the concept of universal standards in human rights, but declared that these standards could not overridet he unique Asian regional and cultural differences, the requirements of economic development, nor the privileges of sovereignty. : The (...)
     
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  2. Richard Wilson (ed.) (1997). Human Rights, Culture and Context: Anthropological Perspectives. Pluto Press.score: 1053.0
  3. Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association (2009). Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights (1999). In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 864.0
     
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  4. Stephen C. Angle (2002). Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry. Cambridge University Press.score: 768.8
    This book is about the origins and development of Chinese ideas of human rights, and about what we in the contemporary world should make of different cultures having different moral ideas. It differs from competing books in two ways. First, its historical account is much fuller, since it shows how Chinese discussions of rights grew out of pre-existing Confucian philosophical concerns. Second, it is also a work of philosophy: it explains what it means to have moral concepts (...)
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  5. A. S. Franklin, B. K. Tranter & R. D. White (2001). Explaining Support for Animal Rights: A Comparison of Two Recent Approaches to Humans, Nonhuman Animals, and Postmodernity. Society and Animals 9 (2):127-144.score: 657.0
    Questions on "animal rights" in a cross-national survey conducted in 1993 provide an opportunity to compare the applicability to this issue of two theories of the socio-political changes summed up in "postmodernity": Inglehart's (1997) thesis of "postmaterialist values" and Franklin's (1999) synthesis of theories of late modernity. Although Inglehart seems not to have addressed human-nonhuman animal relations, it is reasonable to apply his theory of changing values under conditions of "existential security" to "animal rights." Inglehart's postmaterialism thesis (...)
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  6. Abudullahi Ahmed An-Na'im (2009). Toward a Cross-Cultural Approach to Defining International Standards of Human Rights. In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 643.2
     
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  7. Patricia A. Marshall (2005). Human Rights,Cultural Pluralism, and International Health Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):529-557.score: 592.0
    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on health research (...)
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  8. R. P. Peerenboom (2005). Human Rights, China, and Cross-Cultural Inquiry: Philosophy, History, and Power Politics. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):283-320.score: 590.4
  9. R. P. Peerenboom (2005). Cross-Cultural Dialogue on Human Rights and the Limits of Conversation: A Reply to Stephen Angle. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):324-327.score: 590.4
  10. Randall P. Peerenboom (2005). Cross-Cultural Dialogue on Human Rights and the Limits of Conversation: A Reply to Stephen Angle. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):324 - 327.score: 590.4
  11. Randall P. Peerenboom (2005). Human Rights, China, and Cross-Cultural Inquiry: Philosophy, History, and Power Politics. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):283 - 320.score: 590.4
  12. Alistair M. Macleod (2008). Universal Human Rights and Cultural Diversity. Social Philosophy Today 24:13-26.score: 542.4
    I argue that a reasonably comprehensive doctrine of human rights can be reconciled with at least a good deal of diversity in cultural belief and practice. The reconciliation cannot be achieved by trying to show that there is in fact a cross-cultural consensus about the existence of human rights, partly because no valid inference to the normative status of human rights can be drawn from the existence of such a consensus. However, by highlighting (...)
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  13. Paresh Kathrani (2012). Quality Circles and Human Rights: Tackling the Universalism and Cultural Relativism Divide. [REVIEW] AI and Society 27 (3):369-375.score: 507.6
    The implementation of international human rights law has traditionally been undermined by the dichotomy between universalism and cultural relativism. Some groups regard human rights as more reflective of other culture’s and are unwilling to subscribe to them. One response to this is to enable groups to take co-ownership of human rights. Quality Circles based on institutions and technology, and the collaboration they encourage, provide one such means for doing so. What is required is for (...)
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  14. Katharine MacDonald (2007). Cross-Cultural Comparison of Learning in Human Hunting. Human Nature 18 (4):386-402.score: 494.0
    This paper is a cross-cultural examination of the development of hunting skills and the implications for the debate on the role of learning in the evolution of human life history patterns. While life history theory has proven to be a powerful tool for understanding the evolution of the human life course, other schools, such as cultural transmission and social learning theory, also provide theoretical insights. These disparate theories are reviewed, and alternative and exclusive predictions are identified. This (...)
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  15. Ruth Macklin (1999). Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 477.0
    This book provides an analysis of the debate surrounding cultural diversity, and attempts to reconcile the seemingly opposing views of "ethical imperialism," the belief that each individual is entitled to fundamental human rights, and cultural relativism, the belief that ethics must be relative to particular cultures and societies. The author examines the role of cultural tradition, often used as a defense against critical ethical judgments. Key issues in health and medicine are explored in the context of cultural diversity: (...)
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  16. Sumner B. Twiss (2004). History, Human Rights, and Globalization. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):39-70.score: 460.8
    An illustrative comparison of human rights in 1948 and the contemporary period, attempting to gauge the impact of globalization on changes in the content of human rights (e.g., collective rights, women's rights, right to a healthy environment), major abusers and guarantors of human rights (e.g., state actors, transnational corporations, social movements), and alternative justifications of human rights (e.g., pragmatic agreement, moral intuitionism, overlapping consensus, cross-cultural dialogue).
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  17. Edmund F. Byrne (2014). Towards Enforceable Bans on Illicit Businesses: From Moral Relativism to Human Rights. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):119-130.score: 460.8
    Many scholars and activists favor banning illicit businesses, especially given that such businesses constitute a large part of the global economy. But these businesses are commonly operated as if they are subject only to the ethical norms their management chooses to recognize, and as a result they sometimes harm innocent people. This can happen in part because there are no effective legal constraints on illicit businesses, and in part because it seems theoretically impossible to dispose definitively of arguments that support (...)
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  18. Caroline Walsh (2010). Compliance and Non-Compliance with International Human Rights Standards: Overplaying the Cultural. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (1):45-64.score: 457.2
    This paper interrogates a ‘positive’ view of culture’s (potential) role in widening compliance with international human rights standards, which (1) concentrates on the ‘cultural’ bases of conflict over rights and, in consequence, (2) focuses primarily on cultural interpretation as a means of achieving greater respect for rights norms. The thrust of the paper is that the relationship between culture and human rights norms is much more complex than this positive perspective implies and, this being (...)
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  19. Felicity Goodyear-Smith, Brenda Lobb, Graham Davies, Israel Nachson & Sheila Seelau (2002). International Variation in Ethics Committee Requirements: Comparisons Across Five Westernised Nations. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 3 (1):1-8.score: 447.6
    Background Ethics committees typically apply the common principles of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice to research proposals but with variable weighting and interpretation. This paper reports a comparison of ethical requirements in an international cross-cultural study and discusses their implications. Discussion The study was run concurrently in New Zealand, UK, Israel, Canada and USA and involved testing hypotheses about believability of testimonies regarding alleged child sexual abuse. Ethics committee requirements to conduct this study ranged from nil in Israel to (...)
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  20. Michael Brannigan (2000). Cultural Diversity and the Case Against Ethical Relativism. Health Care Analysis 8 (3):321-327.score: 441.6
    The movement to respect culturaldiversity, known as multiculturalism, poses a dauntingchallenge to healthcare ethics. Can we construct adefensible passage from the fact of culturaldifferences to any claims regarding morality? Or doesmulticulturalism lead to ethical relativism? Macklinargues that, in view of a leading distinction betweenuniversalism in ethics and moral absolutism, the onlyreasonable passage avoids both absolutism andrelativism. She presents a strong case againstethical relativism and its pernicious consequences forcross-cultural issues in healthcare. She alsoprovides sound criteria for the assessment of aculture's moral (...)
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  21. Daniel W. Sellen & Diana B. Smay (2001). Relationship Between Subsistence and Age at Weaning in “Preindustrial” Societies. Human Nature 12 (1):47-87.score: 441.6
    Cross-cultural studies have revealed broad quantitative associations between subsistence practice and demographic parameters for preindustrial populations. One explanation is that variationin the availability of suitable weaning foods influenced the frequency and duration of breastfeeding and thus the length of interbirth intervals and the probability of child survival (the “weaning food availability” hypothesis). We examine the available data on weaning age variation in preindustrial populations and report results of a cross-cultural test of the predictions that weaning occurred earlier (...)
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  22. Irenäus Eibl-Eibesfeldt (1979). Human Ethology: Concepts and Implications for the Sciences of Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):1-26.score: 434.4
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  23. Caroline L. Payne (2009). Bringing Home the Bacon or Not? Globalization and Government Respect for Economic and Social Rights. Human Rights Review 10 (3):413-429.score: 427.2
    The impact of globalization on human rights has generated substantial debate. On the one hand, those making liberal, free-market arguments assert that globalization has a positive impact on developing countries through the increased generation of wealth (e.g., Garrett 1998; Richards et al. in International Studies Quarterly 45:219–239, 2001; Rodrik in Challenge 41:81–94, 1997). On the other hand, the critical perspective claims that globalization negatively impacts respect for human rights because trading arrangements, while open, are detrimentally (...)
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  24. Carola Sandbacka (1987). Understanding Other Cultures: Studies in the Philosophical Problems of Cross-Cultural Interpretation. Distributed by Akateeminen Kirjakauppa.score: 426.6
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  25. Xiaorong Li (2005). Ethics, Human Rights, and Culture: Beyond Relativism and Universalism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 419.4
    Is it possible, given culturally incongruent perspectives, to validate any common standards of behavior? Is it possible to implement human rights in societies without incorporating the idea into their fabric of culture? Is it possible for cultural communities to survive in the contemporary world without rights protection? This book addresses questions like these in the light of an inventive and original understanding of culture.
     
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  26. Thomas Pollet (2013). Much Ado About P. What Does a P-Value Mean When Testing Hypotheses with Aggregated Cross-Cultural Data in the Field of Evolution and Human Behavior? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 417.6
    Much ado about p. What does a p-value mean when testing hypotheses with aggregated cross-cultural data in the field of evolution and human behavior?
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  27. Siobhan Brownlie (2002). La Traduction de la Terminologie Philosophique. Meta 47 (3):296-310.score: 410.4
    After examining certain general characteristics of philosophical terminology which are important for the translation of the terms, the author studies the translation of philosophical lexis in a corpus of texts, highlighting the difference in treatment of technical terms and general lexis. A more detailed study of the corpus reveals complexities beyond that binary dichotomy. The author then aims to produce explanations for the translational practice which have been adduced. This necessitates exploring the social context in which the translated terms (...)
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  28. Elizabeth Cashdan & Matthew Steele (2013). Pathogen Prevalence, Group Bias, and Collectivism in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. Human Nature 24 (1):59-75.score: 388.8
    It has been argued that people in areas with high pathogen loads will be more likely to avoid outsiders, to be biased in favor of in-groups, and to hold collectivist and conformist values. Cross-national studies have supported these predictions. In this paper we provide new pathogen codes for the 186 cultures of the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample and use them, together with existing pathogen and ethnographic data, to try to replicate these cross-national findings. In support of the theory, we (...)
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  29. Pragna Patel (2008). Faith in the State? Asian Women's Struggles for Human Rights in the U.K. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):9-36.score: 388.8
    The discourse of multiculturalism provides a useful means of understanding the complexities, tensions, and dilemmas that Asian and other minority women in the U.K. grapple with in their quest for human rights. However, the adoption of multiculturalist approaches has also silenced women’s voices, obscuring, for example, the role of the family in gendered violence and abuse. Focusing on the work of Southall Black Sisters, and locating this work within current debates on the intersection of government policy, cultural diversity, (...)
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  30. Virgil Ciomos (2010). The Deterritorialization of Human Rights. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):17-27.score: 388.0
    The jurisdiction of Human Rights finds itself in a paradoxical situation for, on the one hand, these rights are affirmed as universal and, on the other, they emerged from within the boundaries of certain determinate states. That is why Western modernity is marked by a tension between the primary, determined territory proper to the emergence of human right and their universal, world calling. With regard to this tension the present study focuses on several key issues in (...)
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  31. Anna Wierzbicka (2005). Empirical Universals of Language as a Basis for the Study of Other Human Universals and as a Tool for Exploring Cross‐Cultural Differences. Ethos 33 (2):256-291.score: 386.0
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  32. Richard T. Peterson (2004). Human Rights and Cultural Conflict. Human Rights Review 5 (3):22-32.score: 383.4
    In speaking of a right in relation to identity formation, I have avoided many important questions, including questions about how properly to understand identity formation itself. Evoking such a right does draw from existing trends, but it remains speculative. Nonetheless, it captures one valuable insight in criticisms of human rights as a Western imposition, namely the insight that an important kind of oppression figures in the imposition of identities. By affirming a human right in relation to identity (...)
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  33. Gili S. Drori (ed.) (2003). Science in the Modern World Polity: Institutionalization and Globalization. Stanford University Press.score: 381.0
    This book presents empirical studies of the rise, expansion, and influence of scientific discourse and organization throughout the world, over the past century. Using quantitative cross-national data, it shows the impact of this scientized world polity on national societies. It examines how this world scientific system and national reflections of it have influenced a wide variety of institutional spheres—the economy, political systems, human rights, environmentalism, and organizational reforms. The authors argue that the triumph of science across social (...)
     
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  34. Claudio Corradetti (2013). What Does Cultural Difference Require of Human Rights. In Cindy Holder & David Reidy (eds.), Human Rights. The Hard Questions, Cambridge University Press.score: 378.0
    Th e contemporary right to freedom of thought together with all its further declinations into freedom of speech, religion, conscience and expression, had one of its earliest historical recognitions at the end of the Wars of Religion with the Edict of Nantes (1598). In several respects one can saythat the right to freedom of thought is virtually “co-original” with the endof the Wars of Religion. Following this thought further, one might think that human rights defi ne the boundaries (...)
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  35. Kristina Orfali & Elisa Gordon (2004). Autonomy Gone Awry: A Cross-Cultural Study of Parents' Experiences in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):329-365.score: 376.4
    This paper examines parents experiences of medical decision-making and coping with having a critically ill baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) from a cross-cultural perspective (France vs. U.S.A.). Though parents experiences in the NICU were very similar despite cultural and institutional differences, each system addresses their needs in a different way. Interviews with parents show that French parents expressed overall higher satisfaction with the care of their babies and were better able to cope with the loss of (...)
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  36. Stefano Semplici (forthcoming). Balancing the Principles: Why the Universality of Human Rights is Not the Trojan Horse of Moral Imperialism. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-9.score: 372.6
    The new dilemmas and responsibilities which arise in bioethics both because of the unprecedented pace of scientific development and of growing moral pluralism are more and more difficult to grapple with. At the ‘global’ level, the call for the universal nature at least of some fundamental moral values and principles is often being contended as a testament of arrogance, if not directly as a new kind of subtler imperialism. The human rights framework itself, which provided the basis for (...)
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  37. Claudia Messina & Liliana Jacott (2013). An Exploratory Study of Human Rights Knowledge: A Sample of Kindergarten and Elementary School Pre-Service Teachers in Spain. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (3):213-230.score: 367.2
    This study aims to explore the level of information and knowledge 150 Spanish kindergarten and elementary school teachers in pre-service training have about human rights. We compared two groups of students: students with no specific training and students with specific training (the students with specific training study with the new training teaching programme that includes a compulsory subject related to citizenship education). The contents are organized around three thematic areas. Human rights are included in the first (...)
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  38. Joyce Apsel (2011). Educating a New Generation: The Model of the “Genocide and Human Rights University Program”. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (4):465-486.score: 367.2
    This paper examines the design and teaching of "Genocide and Human Rights," an innovative, higher education course introduced in 2002 to provide training for a new generation of scholars and teachers. The course was developed and funded by a small non-profit organization, the Zoryan Institute, in Toronto, Canada. One purpose of the course is to teach about the Armenian genocide within a comparative genocide and human rights framework. Another goal is to fill a gap in the (...)
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  39. Yaohua Chen (2010). Ren Quan Bu Shi Bo Lai Pin: Kua Wen Hua Zhe Xue de Ren Quan Tan Jiu = Human Rights and Culture an Intercultural Philosophical Study on Human Rights. Wu Nan Tu Shu Chu Ban Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.score: 362.4
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  40. Justine Nolan & Luke Taylor (2009). Corporate Responsibility for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: Rights in Search of a Remedy? Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):433 - 451.score: 361.8
    It is no longer a revelation that companies have some responsibility to uphold human rights. However, delineating the boundaries of the relationship between business and human rights is more vexed. What is it that we are asking corporations to assume responsibility for and how far does that responsibility extend? This article focuses on the extent to which economic, social and cultural rights fall within a corporation's sphere of responsibility. It then analyses how corporations may be (...)
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  41. Fred R. Dallmayr (2002). "Asian Values" and Global Human Rights. Philosophy East and West 52 (2):173-189.score: 357.6
    Are human rights universal, and, if so, in what sense? Starting with the opposition between "foundational" universalism (as articulated in modern natural law and rationalist liberalism) and "antifoundational" skepsis or relativism (from Jeremy Bentham to Richard Rorty) and steering a path beyond this dichotomy, an inquiry is made into the "rightness" of rights-claims, a question that calls for situated, prudential judgment. With specific reference to "Asian values," Henry Rosemont's emphasis is followed on the need to differentiate between (...)
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  42. Fred Reinhard Dallmayr (2002). "Asian Values" and Global Human Rights. Philosophy East and West 52 (2):173 - 189.score: 357.6
    Are human rights universal, and, if so, in what sense? Starting with the opposition between "foundational" universalism (as articulated in modern natural law and rationalist liberalism) and "antifoundational" skepsis or relativism (from Jeremy Bentham to Richard Rorty) and steering a path beyond this dichotomy, an inquiry is made into the "rightness" of rights-claims, a question that calls for situated, prudential judgment. With specific reference to "Asian values," Henry Rosemont's emphasis is followed on the need to differentiate between (...)
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  43. Reilly J. (2009). Cross-Cultural Studies of Williams Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 357.6
  44. Laurence Fiddick, Denise Dellarosa Cummins, Maria Janicki, Sean Lee & Nicole Erlich (2013). A Cross-Cultural Study of Noblesse Oblige in Economic Decision-Making. Human Nature 24 (3):318-335.score: 357.2
    A cornerstone of economic theory is that rational agents are self-interested, yet a decade of research in experimental economics has shown that economic decisions are frequently driven by concerns for fairness, equity, and reciprocity. One aspect of other-regarding behavior that has garnered attention is noblesse oblige, a social norm that obligates those of higher status to be generous in their dealings with those of lower status. The results of a cross-cultural study are reported in which marked noblesse oblige was (...)
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  45. Paul Healy (2006). Human Rights and Intercultural Relations: A Hermeneutico-Dialogical Approach. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (4):513-541.score: 355.2
    By drawing on hermeneutico-dialogical principles, the approach developed here seeks to advance the global implementation of a viable human rights regime in a manner commensurate with the preservation of culture-specific differences. To this end, the present article undertakes to elucidate the conditions under which the ongoing intercultural debate about rights might yield a more productive outcome through fostering the implementation of the international human rights regime in a manner that can do justice to core intra-cultural (...)
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  46. Oliver H. Osborne (1980). Cross-Cultural Social Science Research and Questions of Scientific Medical Imperialism. Bioethics Quarterly 2 (3):159-163.score: 355.2
    Concern for the rights and safety of individuals has caused clinical researchers to develop informed consent protocols for research involving human subjects. The applicapability of these regulations to social science research is often tenuous, since such research usually focuses on populations rather than individuals, and potential damage is apt to be political rather than personal. In cross-cultural social research, the protocols developed by Western clinical researchers may be not only ludicrously inapplicable, but intrusive and disruptive within the (...)
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  47. Fuad Al‐Daraweesh & Dale T. Snauwaert (2013). Toward a Hermeneutical Theory of International Human Rights Education. Educational Theory 63 (4):389-412.score: 355.2
    The purpose of this essay is to articulate and defend the epistemological foundations of international human rights education from the perspective of a hermeneutical interpretive methodology. Fuad Al-Daraweesh and Dale Snauwaert argue here that this methodology potentially alleviates the challenges that face the cross-cultural implementation of human rights education. While acknowledging the necessity of global human rights awareness, the authors maintain that local cultural conceptualization is imperative to the negotiated, local embrace of (...) rights. A critical, interpretive pedagogy emerges from grounding human rights education in a hermeneutic methodology. Thus, Al-Daraweesh and Snauwaert advocate taking a hermeneutical approach in order to enlarge the scope and meaning of international human rights education. (shrink)
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  48. Antonio Sánchez-Bayón (2013). History, Historiology and Historiography of U.S. Cross-Cultural Studies. Cinta de Moebio 48:147-157.score: 345.6
    This article explains the History (past reality), the Historiology (the theories and methods to study the past), and the Historiography (the academic literature) about Cross-Cultural Studies in the U.S.A., from traditional and native subjects (i.e. American Studies), until the current version. It pays attention to religion, as a relevant factor in the evolution of U.S. culture and its model of social relations. En este artículo se explica la Historia (la realidad pasada), la Historiología (las teorías y métodos (...)
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  49. Susan Moller Okin (1998). Feminism, Women's Human Rights, and Cultural Differences. Hypatia 13 (2):32 - 52.score: 343.8
    The recent global movement for women's human rights has achieved considerable re-thinking of human rights as previously understood. Since many of women's rights violations occur in the private sphere of family life, and are justified by appeals to cultural or religious norms, both families and cultures (including their religious aspects) have come under critical scrutiny.
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  50. William Sweet (1998). Human Rights and Cultural Diversity. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (1):117-132.score: 343.8
    In this paper, I discuss some challenges to the discourse of universal human rights made by those who insist that the existence of pluralism and cultural diversity count against it. I focus on arguments made in a recent article by Vinay Lal but also address several other criticisms of universal human rights-arguments hinted at, but not elaborated, by Lal. I maintain that these challenges frequently fail to distinguish the discourse of human rights from its (...)
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