Search results for 'Human rights Cross-cultural studies' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association (2009). Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights (1999). In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  2. Michael C. Davis (ed.) (1995). Human Rights and Chinese Values: Legal, Philosophical, and Political Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    In March 1993, in preparation for the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, representatives from the states of Asia gathered in Bangkok to formulate their position on this emotive issue. The result of their discussions was the Bangkok declaration. They accepted the concept of universal standards in human rights, but declared that these standards could not overridet he unique Asian regional and cultural differences, the requirements of economic development, nor the privileges of sovereignty. : The (...)
     
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  3. Stephen C. Angle (2002). Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry. Cambridge University Press.
    What should we make of claims by members of other groups to have moralities different from our own? Human Rights in Chinese Thought gives an extended answer to this question in the first study of its kind. It integrates a full account of the development of Chinese rights discourse - reaching back to important, though neglected, origins of that discourse in 17th and 18th century Confucianism - with philosophical consideration of how various communities should respond to contemporary (...)
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  4. Stephen C. Angle (2009). Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry. Cambridge University Press.
    What should we make of claims by members of other groups to have moralities different from our own? Human Rights in Chinese Thought gives an extended answer to this question in the first study of its kind. It integrates a full account of the development of Chinese rights discourse - reaching back to important, though neglected, origins of that discourse in 17th and 18th century Confucianism - with philosophical consideration of how various communities should respond to contemporary (...)
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  5.  48
    Stephen C. Angle (2002). Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about the origins and development of Chinese ideas of human rights, and about what we in the contemporary world should make of different cultures having different moral ideas. It differs from competing books in two ways. First, its historical account is much fuller, since it shows how Chinese discussions of rights grew out of pre-existing Confucian philosophical concerns. Second, it is also a work of philosophy: it explains what it means to have moral concepts (...)
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  6. Richard Wilson (ed.) (1997). Human Rights, Culture and Context: Anthropological Perspectives. Pluto Press.
  7. Jerald D. Gort, Henry Jansen, Hendrick M. Vroom & Irene J. Bloom (1999). Human Rights in Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (1):149-177.
    In reviewing five edited collections and one monograph from the 1990s, the article summarizes the present status of the "human rights revolution" that was signaled by the adoption in 1948 of the "Universal Declaration of Human Rights". It goes on to elaborate and evaluate some of the attempts contained in these books to deal with theoretical and practical controversies surrounding the subject of human rights, particularly the discussion of what to make of "cultural relativism" (...)
     
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  8. Abudullahi Ahmed An-Na'im (2009). Toward a Cross-Cultural Approach to Defining International Standards of Human Rights. In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  9. Randall P. Peerenboom (2005). Human Rights, China, and Cross-Cultural Inquiry: Philosophy, History, and Power Politics. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):283 - 320.
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  10. Randall P. Peerenboom (2005). Cross-Cultural Dialogue on Human Rights and the Limits of Conversation: A Reply to Stephen Angle. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):324 - 327.
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  11. R. P. Peerenboom (2005). Human Rights, China, and Cross-Cultural Inquiry: Philosophy, History, and Power Politics. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):283-320.
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  12. R. P. Peerenboom (2005). Cross-Cultural Dialogue on Human Rights and the Limits of Conversation: A Reply to Stephen Angle. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):324-327.
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  13. Heiner Bielefeldt (1997). Towards A Cosmopolitan Framework Of Freedom: The Contribution Of Kantian Universalism To Cross-cultural Debates On Human Rights. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 5.
    Die Frage, ob und wie der universale Geltungsanspruch der Menschenrechte sich mit dem Pluralismus der Religionen und Kulturen vermitteln läßt, ist ein zentrales Thema innerhalb der gegenwärtigen Menschenrechtsdebatte. Die Kantische Philosophie kann einen Beitrag zu dieser Debatte leisten, indem sie dazu verhilft, einige vielfach beschworene Dichotomien kritisch auszuräumen, durch die die interkulturelle Verständigung über Menschenrechte nicht selten schon im Ansatz blockiert wird. Nach Kant zielt eine kosmopolitische rechtliche Rahmenordnung nicht auf globale Uniformierung, sondern auf die politisch-rechtliche Gestaltung der faktisch erreichten (...)
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  14.  26
    Alistair M. Macleod (2008). Universal Human Rights and Cultural Diversity. Social Philosophy Today 24:13-26.
    I argue that a reasonably comprehensive doctrine of human rights can be reconciled with at least a good deal of diversity in cultural belief and practice. The reconciliation cannot be achieved by trying to show that there is in fact a cross-cultural consensus about the existence of human rights, partly because no valid inference to the normative status of human rights can be drawn from the existence of such a consensus. However, by highlighting (...)
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  15.  61
    Patricia A. Marshall (2005). Human Rights,Cultural Pluralism, and International Health Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):529-557.
    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on health research (...)
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  16.  71
    Paresh Kathrani (2012). Quality Circles and Human Rights: Tackling the Universalism and Cultural Relativism Divide. [REVIEW] AI and Society 27 (3):369-375.
    The implementation of international human rights law has traditionally been undermined by the dichotomy between universalism and cultural relativism. Some groups regard human rights as more reflective of other culture’s and are unwilling to subscribe to them. One response to this is to enable groups to take co-ownership of human rights. Quality Circles based on institutions and technology, and the collaboration they encourage, provide one such means for doing so. What is required is for (...)
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  17.  14
    Caroline Walsh (2010). Compliance and Non-Compliance with International Human Rights Standards: Overplaying the Cultural. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (1):45-64.
    This paper interrogates a ‘positive’ view of culture’s (potential) role in widening compliance with international human rights standards, which (1) concentrates on the ‘cultural’ bases of conflict over rights and, in consequence, (2) focuses primarily on cultural interpretation as a means of achieving greater respect for rights norms. The thrust of the paper is that the relationship between culture and human rights norms is much more complex than this positive perspective implies and, this being (...)
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  18. Marco Gemignani & Ezequiel Peña (2007). Postmodern Conceptualizations of Culture in Social Constructionism and Cultural Studies. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 27 (2-1):276-300.
    The theorization of culture in psychology continues to gain momentum in spite of little agreement concerning the most suitable theoretical frameworks for examining cultural phenomena. We explore two contemporary approaches to culture--social constructionism and cultural studies--and examine their relevance for psychology. In juxtapositioning them we map their continuities and discontinuities in terms of ontological and epistemological stances on language, representation, knowledge, identity, history, ideology, social action and emancipation. We propose a bridge between the two, and discuss ways in which (...)
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  19.  40
    A. S. Franklin, B. K. Tranter & R. D. White (2001). Explaining Support for Animal Rights: A Comparison of Two Recent Approaches to Humans, Nonhuman Animals, and Postmodernity. Society and Animals 9 (2):127-144.
    Questions on "animal rights" in a cross-national survey conducted in 1993 provide an opportunity to compare the applicability to this issue of two theories of the socio-political changes summed up in "postmodernity": Inglehart's (1997) thesis of "postmaterialist values" and Franklin's (1999) synthesis of theories of late modernity. Although Inglehart seems not to have addressed human-nonhuman animal relations, it is reasonable to apply his theory of changing values under conditions of "existential security" to "animal rights." Inglehart's postmaterialism thesis (...)
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  20. Carola Sandbacka (1987). Understanding Other Cultures: Studies in the Philosophical Problems of Cross-Cultural Interpretation. Distributed by Akateeminen Kirjakauppa.
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  21.  5
    Katharine MacDonald (2007). Cross-Cultural Comparison of Learning in Human Hunting. Human Nature 18 (4):386-402.
    This paper is a cross-cultural examination of the development of hunting skills and the implications for the debate on the role of learning in the evolution of human life history patterns. While life history theory has proven to be a powerful tool for understanding the evolution of the human life course, other schools, such as cultural transmission and social learning theory, also provide theoretical insights. These disparate theories are reviewed, and alternative and exclusive predictions are identified. This (...)
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  22.  4
    Eric William Metcalfe, David Miller & John Gardner (2000). Are Cultural Rights Human Rights? A Cosmopolitan Conception of Cultural Rights.
    The liberal conception of the state is marked by an insistence upon the equal civil and political rights of each inhabitant. Recently, though, a number of writers have argued that this emphasis on uniform rights ignores the fact that the populations of most states are culturally diverse, and that their inhabitants have significant interests qua members of particular cultures. They argue that liberals should recognize special, group-based cultural rights as a necessary part of a theory of justice (...)
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  23.  63
    Sumner B. Twiss (2004). History, Human Rights, and Globalization. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):39-70.
    An illustrative comparison of human rights in 1948 and the contemporary period, attempting to gauge the impact of globalization on changes in the content of human rights (e.g., collective rights, women's rights, right to a healthy environment), major abusers and guarantors of human rights (e.g., state actors, transnational corporations, social movements), and alternative justifications of human rights (e.g., pragmatic agreement, moral intuitionism, overlapping consensus, cross-cultural dialogue).
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  24.  32
    Rachel E. Watson‐Jones, Justin T. A. Busch & Cristine H. Legare (2015). Interdisciplinary and Cross‐Cultural Perspectives on Explanatory Coexistence. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):611-623.
    Natural and supernatural explanations are used to interpret the same events in a number of predictable and universal ways. Yet little is known about how variation in diverse cultural ecologies influences how people integrate natural and supernatural explanations. Here, we examine explanatory coexistence in three existentially arousing domains of human thought: illness, death, and human origins using qualitative data from interviews conducted in Tanna, Vanuatu. Vanuatu, a Melanesian archipelago, provides a cultural context ideal for examining variation in explanatory (...)
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  25.  11
    Edmund F. Byrne (2014). Towards Enforceable Bans on Illicit Businesses: From Moral Relativism to Human Rights. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):119-130.
    Many scholars and activists favor banning illicit businesses, especially given that such businesses constitute a large part of the global economy. But these businesses are commonly operated as if they are subject only to the ethical norms their management chooses to recognize, and as a result they sometimes harm innocent people. This can happen in part because there are no effective legal constraints on illicit businesses, and in part because it seems theoretically impossible to dispose definitively of arguments that support (...)
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  26.  1
    Richard T. Peterson (2004). Human Rights and Cultural Conflict. Human Rights Review 5 (3):22-32.
    In speaking of a right in relation to identity formation, I have avoided many important questions, including questions about how properly to understand identity formation itself. Evoking such a right does draw from existing trends, but it remains speculative. Nonetheless, it captures one valuable insight in criticisms of human rights as a Western imposition, namely the insight that an important kind of oppression figures in the imposition of identities. By affirming a human right in relation to identity (...)
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  27. Claudio Corradetti (2013). What Does Cultural Difference Require of Human Rights. In Cindy Holder & David Reidy (eds.), Human Rights. The Hard Questions, Cambridge University Press.
    Th e contemporary right to freedom of thought together with all its further declinations into freedom of speech, religion, conscience and expression, had one of its earliest historical recognitions at the end of the Wars of Religion with the Edict of Nantes (1598). In several respects one can saythat the right to freedom of thought is virtually “co-original” with the endof the Wars of Religion. Following this thought further, one might think that human rights defi ne the boundaries (...)
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  28. Elizabeth Cashdan & Matthew Steele (2013). Pathogen Prevalence, Group Bias, and Collectivism in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. Human Nature 24 (1):59-75.
    It has been argued that people in areas with high pathogen loads will be more likely to avoid outsiders, to be biased in favor of in-groups, and to hold collectivist and conformist values. Cross-national studies have supported these predictions. In this paper we provide new pathogen codes for the 186 cultures of the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample and use them, together with existing pathogen and ethnographic data, to try to replicate these cross-national findings. In support of the theory, we (...)
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  29. Ruth Macklin (1999). Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    This book provides an analysis of the debate surrounding cultural diversity, and attempts to reconcile the seemingly opposing views of "ethical imperialism," the belief that each individual is entitled to fundamental human rights, and cultural relativism, the belief that ethics must be relative to particular cultures and societies. The author examines the role of cultural tradition, often used as a defense against critical ethical judgments. Key issues in health and medicine are explored in the context of cultural diversity: (...)
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  30. Susan Moller Okin (1998). Feminism, Women's Human Rights, and Cultural Differences. Hypatia 13 (2):32 - 52.
    The recent global movement for women's human rights has achieved considerable re-thinking of human rights as previously understood. Since many of women's rights violations occur in the private sphere of family life, and are justified by appeals to cultural or religious norms, both families and cultures (including their religious aspects) have come under critical scrutiny.
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  31.  31
    Antonio Sánchez-Bayón (2013). History, Historiology and Historiography of U.S. Cross-Cultural Studies. Cinta de Moebio 48:147-157.
    This article explains the History (past reality), the Historiology (the theories and methods to study the past), and the Historiography (the academic literature) about Cross-Cultural Studies in the U.S.A., from traditional and native subjects (i.e. American Studies), until the current version. It pays attention to religion, as a relevant factor in the evolution of U.S. culture and its model of social relations. En este artículo se explica la Historia (la realidad pasada), la Historiología (las teorías y métodos (...)
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  32.  14
    William Sweet (1998). Human Rights and Cultural Diversity. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (1):117-132.
    In this paper, I discuss some challenges to the discourse of universal human rights made by those who insist that the existence of pluralism and cultural diversity count against it. I focus on arguments made in a recent article by Vinay Lal but also address several other criticisms of universal human rights-arguments hinted at, but not elaborated, by Lal. I maintain that these challenges frequently fail to distinguish the discourse of human rights from its (...)
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  33.  21
    Moira Gatens (2004). Can Human Rights Accommodate Women's Rights? Towards an Embodied Account of Social Norms, Social Meaning, and Cultural Change. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (3):275.
    The paper is in four parts. The first part offers a brief reminder of the historical context for human rights as women's rights. The second part notes the relative lack of attention in human rights theory to the roles of social meaning and what has been called the ‘social imaginary’. The third part suggests that the social imaginary — understood in terms of the always present backdrop to meaningful social action — may be seen as (...)
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  34. Heiner Roetz (2006). Cross-Cultural Issues in Bioethics: The Example of Human Cloning. Rodopi.
    Human cloning is a main focus of current bioethical discussion. Involving the self-understanding of the human species, it has become one of the most debated topics in biomedical ethics, not only on the national, but also on the international level.This book brings together articles by bioethicists from several countries who address questions of human cloning within the context of different cultural, religious and regional settings against the background of globalizing biotechnology. It explores on a cross-cultural level (...)
     
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  35.  62
    Rowan Cruft (2005). Human Rights, Individualism and Cultural Diversity. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (3):265-287.
    Abstract Two features of human?rights discourse are often targeted for criticism: its universalism and its individualism. Both features, it is usually claimed, illegitimately overlook the significance of cultural diversity. In this essay I argue that individualism is incompatible with universalism and compatible with cultural diversity. Thus I defend the view that human rights are individualistically justified, and I argue that it follows from this that human rights are in an important sense non?universal. I go (...)
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  36.  43
    Sharon Anderson-Gold (2007). Human Rights, Cultural Identity, and Democracy. Social Philosophy Today 23:57-68.
    This paper traces the evolution of the international concept of a human right to culture from a general and individual right of participation in the public life of a state (1966, Article 27 of the IC of Civil and Political Rights), to a group right to a cultural identity (1992 Declaration on the rights of persons belonging to national or ethnic, religious or linguistic minorities). I argue that the original generic formulation of the human right to (...)
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  37.  11
    Nie Jing-bao (2005). Cultural Values Embodying Universal Norms: A Critique of a Popular Assumption About Cultures and Human Rights. Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):251–257.
    ABSTRACTIn Western and non‐Western societies, it is a widely held belief that the concept of human rights is, by and large, a Western cultural norm, often at odds with non‐Western cultures and, therefore, not applicable in non‐Western societies. The Universal Draft Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights reflects this deep‐rooted and popular assumption. By using Chinese culture as an illustration, this article points out the problems of this widespread misconception and stereotypical view of cultures and (...) rights. It highlights the often ignored positive elements in Chinese cultures that promote and embody universal human values such as human dignity and human rights. It concludes, accordingly, with concrete suggestions on how to modify the Declaration. (shrink)
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  38.  2
    Eric William Metcalfe, David Miller & John Gardner, Are Cultural Rights Human Rights? A Cosmopolitan Conception of Cultural Rights.
    The liberal conception of the state is marked by an insistence upon the equal civil and political rights of each inhabitant. Recently, though, a number of writers have argued that this emphasis on uniform rights ignores the fact that the populations of most states are culturally diverse, and that their inhabitants have significant interests qua members of particular cultures. They argue that liberals should recognize special, group-based cultural rights as a necessary part of a theory of justice (...)
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  39.  8
    Marie-Luisa Frick (2014). The Cultural Defense and Women's Human Rights An Inquiry Into the Rationales for Unveiling Justitia's Eyes to 'Culture'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (6):555-576.
    In our era of globalization, migration increasingly enforces cultural heterogeneity at the level of single societies and countries mirroring the cultural heterogeneity at the macroscopic level, i.e. the planet. Thus, the question of intercultural understanding and coexistence not only is crucial when it comes to states, but is increasingly gaining in importance in terms of identifying preconditions that enable individuals from various cultural backgrounds to share one commonwealth. At present, a growing number of people are convinced that this challenge is (...)
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  40.  18
    W. Kersting (2002). Global Human Rights, Peace and Cultural Difference: Huntington and the Political Philosophy of International Relations. Kantian Review 6 (1):5-34.
    In 1989, the age of power political realism ended. The conditions were set to replace the prevailing Hobbesian model of peace by deterrence with the considerably more challenging Kantian model of peace by right. If, however, Huntington's paradigm of fighting civilizations were right, we would have to forget Kant and remember Hobbes. Sober rationality, healthy distrust, striving for power accumulation and all the other instruments from the realist's toolbox of political prudence are very well suited to facilitate political self-assertion in (...)
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  41.  2
    David R. Hiley (2011). Cultural Politics, Political Innovation, and the Work of Human Rights. Contemporary Pragmatism 8 (1):47-60.
    In his final collection of philosophical papers, Richard Rorty continued his attack on the traditional conception of philosophy by arguing that many of our debates should be thought of as matters of cultural politics rather than about ontology or truth. Consistent with that view, Rorty had argued that we come to see debates about human rights not as an attempt to ground rights in human nature but rather as attempts to expand our moral imagination. I extend (...)
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  42.  7
    Pragna Patel (2008). Faith in the State? Asian Women's Struggles for Human Rights in the U.K. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):9-36.
    The discourse of multiculturalism provides a useful means of understanding the complexities, tensions, and dilemmas that Asian and other minority women in the U.K. grapple with in their quest for human rights. However, the adoption of multiculturalist approaches has also silenced women’s voices, obscuring, for example, the role of the family in gendered violence and abuse. Focusing on the work of Southall Black Sisters, and locating this work within current debates on the intersection of government policy, cultural diversity, (...)
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  43.  7
    Irenäus Eibl-Eibesfeldt (1979). Human Ethology: Concepts and Implications for the Sciences of Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):1-26.
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  44.  4
    Fuyuki Kurasawa (2011). Human Rights as Cultural Practices. In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge 155.
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  45. Ann-Belinda S. Preis (2009). Human Rights as Cultural Practice : An Anthropological Critique. In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell 10--332.
     
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  46. Daniel A. Bell (2000). East Meets West: Human Rights and Democracy in East Asia. Princeton University Press.
    Is liberal democracy a universal ideal? Proponents of "Asian values" argue that it is a distinctive product of the Western experience and that Western powers shouldn't try to push human rights and democracy onto Asian states. Liberal democrats in the West typically counter by questioning the motives of Asian critics, arguing that Asian leaders are merely trying to rationalize human-rights violations and authoritarian rule. In this book--written as a dialogue between an American democrat named Demo and (...)
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  47.  80
    Michael Brannigan (2000). Cultural Diversity and the Case Against Ethical Relativism. Health Care Analysis 8 (3):321-327.
    The movement to respect culturaldiversity, known as multiculturalism, poses a dauntingchallenge to healthcare ethics. Can we construct adefensible passage from the fact of culturaldifferences to any claims regarding morality? Or doesmulticulturalism lead to ethical relativism? Macklinargues that, in view of a leading distinction betweenuniversalism in ethics and moral absolutism, the onlyreasonable passage avoids both absolutism andrelativism. She presents a strong case againstethical relativism and its pernicious consequences forcross-cultural issues in healthcare. She alsoprovides sound criteria for the assessment of aculture's moral (...)
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  48.  67
    Fred R. Dallmayr (2002). "Asian Values" and Global Human Rights. Philosophy East and West 52 (2):173-189.
    Are human rights universal, and, if so, in what sense? Starting with the opposition between "foundational" universalism (as articulated in modern natural law and rationalist liberalism) and "antifoundational" skepsis or relativism (from Jeremy Bentham to Richard Rorty) and steering a path beyond this dichotomy, an inquiry is made into the "rightness" of rights-claims, a question that calls for situated, prudential judgment. With specific reference to "Asian values," Henry Rosemont's emphasis is followed on the need to differentiate between (...)
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  49.  15
    Fuad Al‐Daraweesh & Dale T. Snauwaert (2013). Toward a Hermeneutical Theory of International Human Rights Education. Educational Theory 63 (4):389-412.
    The purpose of this essay is to articulate and defend the epistemological foundations of international human rights education from the perspective of a hermeneutical interpretive methodology. Fuad Al-Daraweesh and Dale Snauwaert argue here that this methodology potentially alleviates the challenges that face the cross-cultural implementation of human rights education. While acknowledging the necessity of global human rights awareness, the authors maintain that local cultural conceptualization is imperative to the negotiated, local embrace of (...) rights. A critical, interpretive pedagogy emerges from grounding human rights education in a hermeneutic methodology. Thus, Al-Daraweesh and Snauwaert advocate taking a hermeneutical approach in order to enlarge the scope and meaning of international human rights education. (shrink)
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  50.  2
    Natalia Washington (2016). Culturally Unbound: Cross-Cultural Cognitive Diversity and the Science of Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):165-179.
    It is now taken for granted in many circles that substantial psychological variability exists across human populations; we do not merely differ in the ways we behave, but in the ways we think, as well. Versions of this view have been around since early interest in ‘cultural relativism’ in cultural psychology and anthropology, but Joe Henrich, Steven Heine, and Ara Norenzayan’s 2010 paper, ‘The Weirdest People in the World?’ has had an exciting and catalyzing impact on the field, getting (...)
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