Search results for 'Human rights Health aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association (2009). Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights (1999). In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  2. Anand K. Pandurangi, Antony Fernandez & Jagannathan Srinivasaraghavan (2nd ed. 2015). Mental Health Services in USA: Ethical and Legal Aspects and Human Rights—What India Can Learn From Western Models. In Adarsh Tripathi & Jitendra Kumar Trivedi (eds.), Mental Health in South Asia: Ethics, Resources, Programs and Legislation. Springer Netherlands
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  3. David J. Rothman (2006). Trust is Not Enough: Bringing Human Rights to Medicine. New York Review Books.
    Addresses the issues at the heart of international medicine and social responsibility. A number of international declarations have proclaimed that health care is a fundamental human right. But if we accept this broad commitment, how should we concretely define the state’s responsibility for the health of its citizens? Although there is growing debate over this issue, there are few books for general readers that provide engaging accounts of critical incidents, practices, and ideas in the field of (...) rights, health care, and medicine. Included in the book are case studies of such issues as AIDS among orphans in Romania, organ trafficking, prison conditions, health care rationing, medical research in the third world, and South Africa’s constitutionally guaranteed right of access to health care. It uses these topics to address themes of protection of vulnerable populations, equity and fairness in delivering competent medical care, informed consent and the free flow of information, and state responsibility for ensuring physical, mental, and social well-being. (shrink)
     
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  4.  8
    Edita Gruodytė (2012). Legal Aspects of Regulation of Abortion in the Context of Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (2):739-752.
    Regulatory approach to the right to abortion in Europe is diverse and basically related to the issue of when the right to life begins and how this question is reflected in national legislation. Such an approach and diversity is tolerated by the European Court of Human Rights, but only if some specific standards and criteria formulated in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights are reflected in national legislation. Research of the Lithuanian legal acts (...)
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  5. Michiel Korthals & Cristian Timmermann (2012). Reflections on the International Networking Conference “Ethical and Social Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights – Agrifood and Health” Brussels, September 2011. Synesis 3 (1):G66-73.
    Public goods, as well as commercial commodities, are affected by exclusive arrangements secured by intellectual property (IP) rights. These rights serve as an incentive to invest human and material capital in research and development. Particularly in the life sciences, IP rights regulate objects such as food and medicines that are key to securing human rights, especially the right to adequate food and the right to health. Consequently, IP serves private (economic) and public interests. (...)
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  6.  4
    Lance Gable (2007). The Proliferation of Human Rights in Global Health Governance. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (4):534-544.
    Human rights play an integral role in the global governance of health. Recently, both structural and normative aspects of human rights have proliferated across multiple levels and within multiple contexts around the world. Human rights proliferation is likely to have a positive impact on the governance of health because it can expand the avenues through which a human rights framework or human rights norms may be used to (...)
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  7.  3
    A. M. Viens (2015). Interdependence, Human Rights and Global Health Law. Health Care Analysis 23 (4):401-417.
    The connection between health and human rights continues to play a prominent role within global health law. In particular, a number of theorists rely on the claim that there is a relation of interdependence between health and human rights. The nature and extent of this relation, however, is rarely defined, developed or defended in a conceptually robust way. This paper seeks to explore the source, scope and strength of this putative relation and what (...)
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  8.  13
    John Tasioulas & Effy Vayena (2016). The Place of Human Rights and the Common Good in Global Health Policy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):365-382.
    This article offers an integrated account of two strands of global health justice: health-related human rights and health-related common goods. After sketching a general understanding of the nature of human rights, it proceeds to explain both how individual human rights are to be individuated and the content of their associated obligations specified. With respect to both issues, the human right to health is taken as the primary illustration. It is (...)
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  9.  6
    Emmanuel Kabengele Mpinga, Leslie London & Philippe Chastonay (2011). Health and Human Rights: Epistemological Status and Perspectives of Development. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):237-247.
    The health and human rights movement (HHR) shows obvious signs of maturation both internally and externally. Yet there are still many questions to be addressed. These issues include the movement’s epistemological status and its perspectives of development. This paper discusses critically the conditions of emergence of HHR, its identity, its dominant schools of thought, its epistemological postures and its methodological issues. Our analysis shows that: (a) the epistemological status of HHR is ambiguous; (b) its identity is uncertain (...)
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  10.  61
    Patricia A. Marshall (2005). Human Rights,Cultural Pluralism, and International Health Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):529-557.
    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically (...)
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  11.  32
    Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait (...)
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  12.  6
    Jalil Safaei (2012). Democracy, Human Rights and Women's Health. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):134.
    Significant improvements in human rights and democracy have been made since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations in 1948. Yet, human rights, especially women's rights, are still being violated in many parts of the developing world. The adverse effects of such violations on women's and children's health are well known, but they are rarely measured. This study uses cross-national data from over 145 countries to estimate (...)
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  13.  75
    Thomas W. Pogge (2005). Human Rights and Global Health: A Research Program. Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):182-209.
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  14.  22
    Lance Gable (2011). The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Public Health, and the Elusive Target of Human Rights. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (3):340-354.
    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) sets in motion a wide range of programs that substantially affected the health system in the United States and signify a moderate but important regulatory shift in the role of the federal government in public health. This article briefly addresses two interesting policy paradoxes about the ACA. First, while the legislation primarily addresses health care financing and insurance and establishes only a few initiatives directly targeting public health, the (...)
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  15. J. Millum (2012). Ethical and Human Rights Concerns in Global Health. In R. Skolnik (ed.), Global Health 101 2ed. Jones & Bartlett 71-86.
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  16. Paula Lobato de Faria (ed.) (2006). The Role of Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights to Promote a Safer and Healthier World. Fundação Luso-Americana.
  17.  46
    Sofia Gruskin, Shahira Ahmed & Laura Ferguson (2008). Provider-Initiated Hiv Testing and Counseling in Health Facilities – What Does This Mean for the Health and Human Rights of Pregnant Women? Developing World Bioethics 8 (1):23–32.
    Since the introduction of drugs to prevent vertical transmission of HIV, the purpose of and approach to HIV testing of pregnant women has increasingly become an area of major controversy. In recent years, many strategies to increase the uptake of HIV testing have focused on offering HIV tests to women in pregnancy-related services. New global guidance issued by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) specifically notes these services as an entry point (...)
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  18.  14
    Aistė Akstinienė (2013). Reservations to Human Rights Treaties: Problematic Aspects Related to Gender Issues. Jurisprudence 20 (2):451-468.
    In this article the author analyses specific reservations that are being done to the international documents for the protection of human rights and whether Vienna Convention on the Law of the Treaties applies to those human rights treaties or not. Also, the author analyses if reservations, which are incompatible with object and purpose of the treaty, can be done or not and what consequences they might bring. For this reason the author describes the practice of the (...)
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  19.  5
    Indrė Pukanasytė (2009). Some Aspects Related to the Interpretation of the Right to Free Elections in the Case-Law of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 115 (1):155-182.
    The paper focuses on the general principles established in the caselaw of the European Court of Human Rights while applying and interpreting the Article 3 of the First Protocol of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms which provides: „The High Contracting Parties undertake to hold free elections at reasonable intervals by secret ballot, under conditions which will ensure the free expression of the opinion of the people in the choice of the (...)
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  20.  4
    Solveiga Cirtautienė (2013). Impact of Human Rights on Private Law in Lithuania and Other European Countries: Problematic Aspects. Jurisprudence 20 (1):77-90.
    The aim of this article is to investigate the problem how and to what extent human rights affect the relationships between private parties and what consequences this effect has for the development of private law in Lithuania and other European countries. Because Lithuanian legal doctrine lacks relevant research on this subject-matter, the author seeks to start and invoke the beginning of conceptual academic discourse on the matter. It is argued that despite the fact that in many countries the (...)
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  21.  3
    Danielle D. Celermajer & Jack Saul (2016). Preventing Torture in Nepal: A Public Health and Human Rights Intervention. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):223-237.
    In this article we address torture in military and police organizations as a public health and human rights challenge that needs to be addressed through multiple levels of intervention. While most mental health approaches focus on treating the harmful effects of such violence on individuals and communities, the goal of the project described here was to develop a primary prevention strategy at the institutional level to prevent torture from occurring in the first place. Such an approach (...)
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  22.  4
    Emanuel Nicolas Cortes Simonet (2014). Victoria's 'Mental Health Act 2014': The Human Rights of Persons with Mental Illness. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (1):3.
    Simonet, Emanuel Nicolas Cortes Victoria's new Mental Health Act 2014 came into operation on 1st July 2014. Corresponding with international standards, the new Act aims to strengthen the human rights of persons with mental illness. This is supported by the inclusion of a recovery framework which promotes a collaborative treatment approach, procedures that reduce the duration of compulsory treatment, as well as better mental health service oversight and safeguards. This article analyses and highlights these reforms from (...)
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  23.  9
    Rida Usman Khalafzai (2009). Public Health and Human Rights. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 14 (3):4.
    Khalafzai, Rida Usman In this era, health has been redefined. The emphasis has shifted from the individual-focussed bio-medical model to a preventative model of collective health. This model of public health often challenges the concept of individual autonomy, the basis of human rights, in the name of the greater good. This article explores the relationship between public health and human rights, and the need for a public health ethic based on the (...)
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  24.  11
    S. Matthew Liao (2016). Health and Human Rights: A Fundamental Conditions Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):259-274.
    Many international declarations state that human beings have a human right to health care. However, is there a human right to health care? What grounds this right, and who has the corresponding duties to promote this right? Elsewhere, I have argued that human beings have human rights to the fundamental conditions for pursuing a good life. Drawing on this fundamental conditions approach of human rights, I offer a novel way of (...)
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  25.  59
    Audrey R. Chapman (2009). Globalization, Human Rights, and the Social Determinants of Health. Bioethics 23 (2):97-111.
    Globalization, a process characterized by the growing interdependence of the world's people, impacts health systems and the social determinants of health in ways that are detrimental to health equity. In a world in which there are few countervailing normative and policy approaches to the dominant neoliberal regime underpinning globalization, the human rights paradigm constitutes a widely shared foundation for challenging globalization's effects. The substantive rights enumerated in human rights instruments include the right (...)
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  26.  11
    Gopal Sreenivasan (2016). Health Care and Human Rights: Against the Split Duty Gambit. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):343-364.
    There are various grounds on which one may wish to distinguish a right to health care from a right to health. In this article, I review some old grounds before introducing some new grounds. But my central task is to argue that separating a right to health care from a right to health has objectionable consequences. I offer two main objections. The domestic objection is that separating the two rights prevents the state from fulfilling its (...)
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  27. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Clarendon Press.
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving health care provision and legal protection for women around the world. This is an authoritative and much-needed introduction to and defence of the concept of reproductive health, which though internationally endorsed, is still contested. The authors are leading authorities on reproductive medicine, women's health, human rights, medical law, and bioethics. They integrate their disciplines to provide an accessible but comprehensive picture. They (...)
     
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  28.  8
    D. Benatar (2006). Bioethics and Health and Human Rights: A Critical View. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (1):17-20.
    Recent decades have seen the emergence of two new fields of inquiry into ethical issues in medicine. These are the fields of bioethics and of health and human rights. In this critical review of these fields, the author argues that bioethics, partly because it has been construed so broadly, suffers from quality control problems. The author also argues that the field of health and human rights is superfluous because it does nothing that cannot be (...)
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  29.  2
    Ruiping Fan (2016). Nonegalitarian Social Responsibility for Health: A Confucian Perspective on Article 14 of the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (2):195-218.
    Article 14 of the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights sets forth a few basic principles regarding social responsibility for health. It states in part that 14.1 The promotion of health and social development for their people is a central purpose of governments that all sectors of society share. 14.2 Taking into account that the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being (...)
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  30.  15
    Lawrence O. Gostin (2001). Beyond Moral Claims: A Human Rights Approach in Mental Health. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):264-274.
    Human rights law is a powerful, but often neglected, tool in advancing the rights and freedoms of persons with mental disabilities. International law may seem marginal or unimportant in developed countries with democratic and constitutional systems of their own. Yet, even democracies often resist reform of mental health law and policy, and domestic courts do not always compel changes necessary for the rights and welfare of persons with mental disabilities. Additionally, human rights are (...)
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  31.  5
    W. Austin (2001). Using the Human Rights Paradigm in Health Ethics: The Problems and the Possibilities. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):183-195.
    Human rights may be the most globalized political value of our times. The rights paradigm has been criticized, however, for being theoretically unsound, legalistic, individualistic and based on the assumption that there is a given and universal humanness. Its use in the area of health is relatively new. Proponents point to its power to frame health as an entitlement rather than a commodity. The problems and the possibilities of a rights approach in addressing (...) ethics issues are explored in this article. (shrink)
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  32.  20
    G. Anderson & M. V. Rorty (2001). Key Points for Developing an International Declaration on Nursing, Human Rights, Human Genetics and Public Health Policy. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):259-271.
    Human rights legislation pertaining to applications of human genetic science is still lacking at an international level. Three international human rights documents now serve as guidelines for countries wishing to develop such legislation. These were drafted and adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the Human Genome Organization, and the Council of Europe. It is critically important that the international nursing community makes known its philosophy and practice-based knowledge relating to ethics (...)
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  33.  8
    Eric Stover & Harvey Weinstein (2001). Health, Human Rights, and Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):335-335.
    Public health and human rights are complementaryapproaches to protecting and promoting human well-being and dignity. Public health addresses the needs of populations and seeks, through intervention and education, to prevent the spread of disease. Enshrined in international law, human rights describe the obligations of governments to safeguard their citizenry from harm and to create conditions where each individual can achieve his or her full potential. Human rights norms lie at the core (...)
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  34.  5
    C. A. Ventura, I. A. Mendes, M. A. Trevizan & D. P. Rodrigues (2012). Human Rights of Drug Users According to Public Health Professionals in Brazil. Nursing Ethics 20 (2):0969733012452681.
    Health is a basic human right, and drug use represents a severe influence on people’s health. This qualitative study aimed to understand how health professionals in a public health-care team working with drug users in a city of the state of São Paulo, Brazil, perceive the human rights of these users and how these rights are being respected in health care. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 10 health professionals (...)
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  35.  3
    Benjamin Mason Meier & Ana S. Ayala (2014). The Pan American Health Organization and the Mainstreaming of Human Rights in Regional Health Governance. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42 (3):356-374.
    In the absence of centralized human rights leadership in an increasingly fragmented global health policy landscape, regional health offices have stepped forward to advance the rights-based approach to health. Reviewing the efforts of the Pan American Health Organization , this article explores the evolution of human rights in PAHO policy, assesses efforts to mainstream human rights in the Pan American Sanitary Bureau , and analyzes the future of the (...)-based approach through regional health governance, providing lessons for other regional health offices and global health institutions. This article explores PAHO's 15-year effort to mainstream human rights through PASB technical units, national capacity-building, the Inter-American human rights system, and the PAHO Directing Council. Through documentary analysis of PAHO policies and semi-structured interviews with key PASB stakeholders, the authors analyze the understandings and actions of policymakers and technical officers in implementing human rights through PAHO governance. Analyzing the themes arising from this narrative, the authors examine the structural role of secretariat leadership, state support, legal expertise, and technical unit commitment in facilitating a rights-based approach to the health in the Americas. Human rights are increasingly framing PAHO efforts, and this analysis of the structures underlying PAHO's approach provides an understanding of the institutional determinants of the rights-based approach to health, highlighting generalizable themes for the mainstreaming of human rights through regional health governance. With this regional-level understanding of health governance, future national-level research can begin to understand the causal forces linking regional human rights work with national policy reforms and public health outcomes. (shrink)
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  36.  10
    Joseph C. D'oronzio (2001). The Integration of Health and Human Rights: An Appreciation of Jonathan M. Mann. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):231-240.
    Jonathan Mann was a pioneer in establishing communication between the world of public health and that of human rights activism. At the very start, he strongly believed that although each of these two fields was in the midst of separate paradigm shifts, these shifts are essential, perhaps causal, to the combined health and human rights movement.
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  37.  6
    Rebecca J. Cook (2013). Human Rights and Maternal Health: Exploring the Effectiveness of the Alyne Decision. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (1):103-123.
    This article explores the effectiveness of the decision of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in the case of Alyne da Silva Pimentel Teixeira (deceased) v. Brazil, concerning a poor, Afro-Brazilian woman. This is the first decision of an international human rights treaty body to hold a state accountable for its failure to prevent an avoidable death in childbirth. Assessing the future effectiveness of this decision might be undertaken concretely by determining the degree of Brazil's (...)
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  38.  3
    C. Pavlish, A. Ho & A. -M. Rounkle (2012). Health and Human Rights Advocacy: Perspectives From a Rwandan Refugee Camp. Nursing Ethics 19 (4):538-549.
    Working at the bedside and within communities as patient advocates, nurses frequently intervene to advance individuals’ health and well-being. However, the International Council of Nurses’ Code of Ethics asserts that nurses should expand beyond the individual model and also promote a rights-enabling environment where respect for human dignity is paramount. This article applies the results of an ethnographic human rights study with displaced populations in Rwanda to argue for a rights-based social advocacy role for (...)
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  39.  1
    Joseph Robert Fitchett, Elena Ferran, Katherine Footer & Natasha Ahmed (2011). Health and Human Rights: An Area of Neglect in the Core Curriculum? Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):258-260.
    Next SectionMedical ethics and law education in the UK is undergoing continuous transformation. In parallel, human rights teaching with respect to health is expanding as a distinct field. Yet a resistance to the inclusion of human rights in the medical ethics and law curriculum persists. In response to Stirrat and colleagues, this article seeks to highlight the mutual benefit that could be derived from an integration of human rights into the already established medical (...)
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  40.  3
    J. Driscoll (1997). In Defence of Patient/Person Human Rights Within National Health Care Provision: Implications for British Nursing. Nursing Ethics 4 (1):66-77.
    One cannot fail to be aware of the ‘human rights’ that are vividly thrust into our living rooms by the world’s media; but, what are human rights and are they of relevance to British nursing practice? In a democratic state such as the UK, human rights infringements or violations are not typified as occurring in a health care system outwardly appearing to safeguard the interests of the patient/person. This paper examines some of the (...)
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  41. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving health care provision and legal protection for women around the world. Here now is an authoritative and much-needed introduction to and defence of the concept that, though internationally endorsed, is still contested by conservative agencies. The authors are leading authorities on reproductive medicine, women's health, human rights, medical law, and bioethics: they integrate their disciplines to provide an accessible but comprehensive picture. They (...)
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  42. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving health care provision and legal protection for women around the world. Here now is an authoritative and much-needed introduction to and defence of the concept that, though internationally endorsed, is still contested by conservative agencies. The authors are leading authorities on reproductive medicine, women's health, human rights, medical law, and bioethics: they integrate their disciplines to provide an accessible but comprehensive picture. They (...)
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  43.  4
    Anita Silvers & Leslie Francis (2013). Human Rights, Civil Rights: Prescribing Disability Discrimination Prevention in Packaging Essential Health Benefits. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (4):781-791.
    This article explores rights-based approaches to protecting disabled people against inequities in access to health care services. Understanding health care as a human right, as is found in the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD), fails to provide theoretical machinery for responding to certain pressing challenges. An alternative account, understanding health care as a civil right, proves more promising. This latter approach then is applied to the right to health (...)
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  44.  3
    Chris Beyrer (2003). Public Health, Human Rights, and the Beneficence of States. Human Rights Review 5 (1):28-33.
    The HIV/AIDS pandemic, now well into its third decade and spreading in states as diverse as Belarus, Ukraine, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea, has shown us that we truly are sharing an interconnected world. As we struggle to deal with both ongoing and emerging threats to public health, and to reach just balances of the rights of individuals and communities, it is critically important not to lose sight of the many states where neither the rights of citizens (...)
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  45.  7
    Benjamin Mason Meier (2007). Advancing Health Rights in a Globalized World: Responding to Globalization Through a Collective Human Right to Public Health. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (4):545-555.
    The right to health was codified in Article 12 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights as an individual right, focusing on individual health services at the expense of public health systems. This article assesses the ways in which the individual human right to health has evolved to meet collective threats to the public's health. Despite its repeated expansions, the individual right to health remains normatively incapable of addressing the (...)
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  46.  21
    Neil Arya & Joanna Santa Barbara (eds.) (2008). Peace Through Health: How Health Professionals Can Work for a Less Violent World. Kumarian Press.
    Those considering careers in medicine and other health and humanitarian disciplines as well as those concerned about the growing presence of militarized ...
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  47.  2
    Yechiel Michael Barilan (2012). Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Responsibility: The New Language of Global Bioethics and Biolaw. The MIT Press.
    "Human dignity" has been enshrined in international agreements and national constitutions as a fundamental human right. The World Medical Association calls on physicians to respect human dignity and to discharge their duties with dignity. And yet human dignity is a term--like love, hope, and justice--that is intuitively grasped but never clearly defined. Some ethicists and bioethicists dismiss it; other thinkers point to its use in the service of particular ideologies. In this book, Michael Barilan offers an (...)
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  48.  7
    Kevin Wm Wildes (2011). David N. Weisstub and Guillermo Diaz Pintos, Eds, Autonomy and Human Rights in Health Care. International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine, Vol. 36. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (1):143-144.
  49.  4
    J. McHale, A. Gallagher & I. Mason (2001). The UK Human Rights Act 1998: Implications for Nurses. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):223-233.
    In this article we consider some of the implications of the UK Human Rights Act 1998 for nurses in practice. The Act has implications for all aspects of social life in Britain, particularly for health care. We provide an introduction to the discourse of rights in health care and discuss some aspects of four articles from the Act. The reciprocal relationship between rights and obligations prompted us to consider also the relationship between (...)
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    Yechiel Michael Barilan (2014). Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Responsibility: The New Language of Global Bioethics and Biolaw. The MIT Press.
    "Human dignity" has been enshrined in international agreements and national constitutions as a fundamental human right. The World Medical Association calls on physicians to respect human dignity and to discharge their duties with dignity. And yet human dignity is a term--like love, hope, and justice--that is intuitively grasped but never clearly defined. Some ethicists and bioethicists dismiss it; other thinkers point to its use in the service of particular ideologies. In this book, Michael Barilan offers an (...)
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