Search results for 'Human rights History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association (2009). Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights (1999). In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  2.  11
    Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of (...)
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  3.  47
    Sumner B. Twiss (2004). History, Human Rights, and Globalization. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):39-70.
    An illustrative comparison of human rights in 1948 and the contemporary period, attempting to gauge the impact of globalization on changes in the content of human rights (e.g., collective rights, women's rights, right to a healthy environment), major abusers and guarantors of human rights (e.g., state actors, transnational corporations, social movements), and alternative justifications of human rights (e.g., pragmatic agreement, moral intuitionism, overlapping consensus, cross-cultural dialogue).
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  4.  5
    Antoon de Baets (2009). The Impact of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the Study of History. History and Theory 48 (1):20-43.
    There is perhaps no text with a broader impact on our lives than the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights . It is strange, therefore, that historians have paid so little attention to the UDHR. I argue that its potential impact on the study of history is profound. After asking whether the UDHR contains a general view of history, I address the consequences of the UDHR for the rights and duties of historians, and explain how (...)
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    Lena Halldenius, On the Use and Abuse of History in Philosophy of Human Rights.
    History plays an important role in the philosophy of human rights, more so than in philosophical discussions on related concepts, such as justice. History tends to be used in order to make it credible that there is a tradition of rights as a moral idea, or an ethical ideal, that transcends national boundaries. In the example that I investigate in this chapter, this moral idea is tightly spun around the moral dignity of the human (...)
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  6.  7
    Raf Geenens (2008). Democracy, Human Rights and History Reading Lefort. European Journal of Political Theory 7 (3):269-286.
    This article offers an overview of the French political philosopher Claude Lefort's oeuvre, arguing that his work should be read as a normative or even universalist justification of democracy and human rights. The notion of history plays a crucial notion in this enterprise, as Lefort demonstrates that there is an ineluctable 'historical' or 'political' condition of human coexistence, a condition that can only be properly accommodated in a regime of democracy and human rights. This (...)
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  7.  4
    Mary Brabeck, Maureen Kenny, Sonia Stryker, Terry Tollefson & Margot Sternstrom (1994). Human Rights Education Through the 'Facing History and Ourselves' Program. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):333-347.
    Abstract This study examined the effects of the Facing History and Ourselves (FHAO) human rights program on moral development and psychological functioning. The FHAO curriculum significantly increased 8th grade students? moral reasoning (Rest's 1979 Defining Issues Test) without adversely impacting on their psychological well?being (scores on depression, hopelessness or self?worth inventories). Girls were more empathic and had higher levels of social interest; boys had higher global self?worth scores; there were no differences between boys and girls in their (...)
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  8.  4
    Abraham Magendzo & María Isabel Toledo (2009). Moral Dilemmas in Teaching Recent History Related to the Violation of Human Rights in Chile. Journal of Moral Education 38 (4):445-465.
    This article reviews the moral dilemmas that a teacher faces in the classroom when teaching recent history which deals with military regimes, violation of human rights and the transition to democracy in Chile . Furthermore, it explores the neutrality of the content taught; the ideological standpoints of the teachers and the students; emotions that emerge; relationships with the victims and so on. These tensions were noted during research undertaken in secondary schools in Santiago, Chile, in 2007. Introducing (...)
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  9.  13
    Abraham Magendzo Kolstrein (2011). Why Are We Involved in Human Rights and Moral Education? Educators as Constructors of Our Own History. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):289-297.
    My professional interest originally focused on curriculum planning and development, but for the last 30 years I have been researching, publishing and teaching in the field of human rights education. Suddenly, I became a human rights educator. Suddenly? No, nothing in our personal and professional life is the result of an abrupt occurrence. We are subjects of a particular history, a succession of events and narratives, located in time, space and circumstances. I constructed myself, consciously (...)
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  10. Katherine O'Donovan & Gerry R. Rubin (eds.) (2000). Human Rights and Legal History: Essays in Honour of Brian Simpson. Oxford University Press Uk.
    A collection of essays with themes in human rights and legal history, spanning several centuries, containing a tribute to one of the most remarkable jurists of our time. Linked by an historical and contextual approach, these essays add to knowledge of legal history and human rights and provide a reference point for future research.
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  11. A. W. B. Simpson, Katherine O'donovan & Gerry R. Rubin (2000). Human Rights and Legal History Essays in Honour of Brian Simpson. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  12.  1
    Rowland Brucken (forthcoming). Human Rights and the Abuses of History by Samuel Moyn. Human Rights Review.
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  13.  11
    William Michael Schmidli (2013). The Human Rights Revolution: An International History by Akira Iriye, Petra Goedde, and William I. Hitchcock (Eds.). [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (1):63-65.
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  14.  8
    Alastair Davidson (2010). History, Human Rights and the Left. Thesis Eleven 100 (1):106-116.
    Marxists should reconsider their usual attitude to universal human rights. On the Jewish Question did not reject the entire French Declaration of 1791. In 1843 Marx and Engels were close to Babouvism, the continuation of French rights. Nor was their view that the 1791 Declaration must be completed by economic and social rights; rather, their criticism concerned the reduction of universal rights to citizen rights because it left the state the final arbiter of justice, (...)
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  15.  1
    Samuel Moyn & Hans Joas (2015). The Sacredness of the Person or The Last Utopia: A Conversation About the History of Human Rights. In David Kim & Susanne Kaul (eds.), Imagining Human Rights. De Gruyter 9-32.
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  16. John Mahoney (2007). The Challenge of Human Rights: Origin, Development, and Significance. Blackwell Pub..
    The Challenge of Human Rights traces the history of human rights theory from classical antiquity through the enlightenment to the modern human rights movement, and analyses the significance of human rights in today’s increasingly globalized world. Provides an engaging study of the origin and the philosophical and political development of human rights discourse. Offers an original defence of human rights. Explores the significance of human rights (...)
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  17. William Michael Schmidli (2013). The Human Rights Revolution: An International History by Akira Iriye, Petra Goedde, and William I. Hitchcock (Eds.): New York: Oxford University Press, 2012 (Book Review). Human Rights Review 14 (1):63-65.
     
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  18. Cushman Thomas (2011). Human Rights in China as an Interdisciplinary Field: History, Current Debates and New Approaches. In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge
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  19. Randall P. Peerenboom (2005). Human Rights, China, and Cross-Cultural Inquiry: Philosophy, History, and Power Politics. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):283 - 320.
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  20. Eric D. Weitz (2013). Samuel Moyn and the New History of Human Rights. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (1):84-93.
  21.  5
    Paul G. Kauper (1971). A Concise History of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Philosophy and History 4 (2):221-223.
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  22. R. P. Peerenboom (2005). Human Rights, China, and Cross-Cultural Inquiry: Philosophy, History, and Power Politics. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):283-320.
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  23.  12
    David Boersema (2015). The Myth of Universal Human Rights: Its Origin, History, and Explanation, Along with a More Humane Way, by David N. Stamos. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (1):208-209.
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  24.  25
    Ross Poole (2012). The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History by Samuel Moyn. Constellations 19 (2):340-343.
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    Costas Douzinas (1999). Human Rights at the End of History. Angelaki 4 (1):99 – 114.
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  26.  9
    —Bronwyn Leebaw (2008). Inventing Human Rights: A History - by Lynn Hunt. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (1):119–121.
  27.  2
    Samuel Moyn (2012). The International Human Rights Movement: A History, Neier , 379 Pp., $35 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 26 (3):392-395.
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  28.  1
    A. Gallagher (2008). Book Review: Hunt L. 2007: Inventing Human Rights -- A History. London: WW Norton, 272 Pp. GBP15.99 . ISBN: 978 0 393 06095 9. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 15 (3):421-422.
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  29. Bronwyn Leebaw (2008). Inventing Human Rights: A History, Lynn Hunt (New York: WW Norton and Company, 2007), 272 Pp., $25.95 Cloth, $14.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 22 (1):119-121.
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  30. Samuel Moyn (2014). The Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 in the History of Cosmopolitanism. Critical Inquiry 40 (4):365-384.
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    A. Belden Fields (2003). Rethinking Human Rights for the New Millennium. Palgrave Macmillan.
    A. Belden Fields invites people to think more deeply about human rights in this book in an attempt to overcome many of the traditional arguments in the human rights literature. He argues that human rights should be reconceptualized in a holistic way to combine philosophical, historical, and empirical-practical dimensions. Human rights are viewed not as a set of universal abstractions but rather as a set of past and ongoing social practices rooted in (...)
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  32.  13
    S. Brincat (2009). 'Death to Tyrants": Self-Defence, Human Rights and Tyrannicide - Part II. Journal of International Political Theory 5 (1):75-93.
    This is the final part of a series of two papers that have examined the conceptual development of the philosophical justifications for tyrannicide. While Part I focused on the classical, medieval, and liberal justifications for tyrannicide, Part II aims to provide the tentative outlines of a contemporary model of tyrannicide in world politics. It is contended that a reinvigorated conception of self-defence, when coupled with the modern understanding of universal human rights, may provide the foundation for the normative (...)
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  33.  12
    Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  34.  5
    Kurt Beurmann (2008). Human Rights in Kosovo. Human Rights Review 9 (1):41-54.
    The emotions surrounding the question of Kosovo’s future owe their intensity to the long history of human rights abuses in the province. The years 1945–1966 and 1987–1999, in particular, saw harsh repression of local Albanians and a systematic favoring of local Serbs. Since June 1999, the province has been under international supervision, and, in this period, Serbs complain that they have been the victims of repeated acts of violence at the hands of Albanians. This article provides an (...)
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  35.  4
    John Dietrich & Caitlyn Witkowski (2012). Obama's Human Rights Policy: Déjà Vu with a Twist. Human Rights Review 13 (1):39-64.
    In US history, much human rights policy developed in four waves during the twentieth century. These waves were triggered by similar circumstances, but all proved short-lived as structural constraints such as limited US power over other countries’ domestic actions, competing US policy priorities, a US hesitance to join multilateral institutions, and the continued domestic political weakness of human rights advocates led to setbacks. As Barack Obama took office, his campaign comments and the past patterns led (...)
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  36. Costas Douzinas (2000). The End of Human Rights: Critical Legal Thought at the Turn of the Century. Hart Pub..
     
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  37. Burleigh Taylor Wilkins (1965). Natural Law, Human Nature, and Natural Rights in Edmund Burke: A Study Inthe History of Ideas. Dissertation, Princeton University
     
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  38.  2
    Mazhar Siraj (2011). Protection and Advancement of Human Rights in Developing Countries: Luxuries or Necessities? Human Affairs 21 (3):304-315.
    The luxury-versus-necessity controversy is primarily concerned with the importance of civil and political rights vis-à-vis economic and social rights. The viewpoint of political leaders of many developing and newly industrialized countries, especially China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Indonesia is that civil and political rights are luxuries that only rich nations can afford. The United Nations, transnational civil society and the Western advanced countries oppose this viewpoint on normative and empirical grounds. While this controversy is far from (...)
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  39. Hans Christian Günther & Andrea A. Robiglio (eds.) (2010). The European Image of God and Man: A Contribution to the Debate on Human Rights. Brill.
     
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  40. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2009). Narrative Structures, Narratives of Abuse, and Human Rights. In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non- Ideal. Kluwer
    This paper explores the relation between victims’ stories and normativity. As a contribution to understanding how the stories of those who have been abused or oppressed can advance moral understanding, catalyze moral innovation, and guide social change, this paper focuses on narrative as a variegated form of representation and asks whether personal narratives of victimization play any distinctive role in human rights discourse. In view of the fact that a number of prominent students of narrative build normativity into (...)
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  41.  40
    Patricia A. Marshall (2005). Human Rights,Cultural Pluralism, and International Health Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):529-557.
    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on health research (...)
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  42.  4
    Emmanuel Kabengele Mpinga, Leslie London & Philippe Chastonay (2011). Health and Human Rights: Epistemological Status and Perspectives of Development. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):237-247.
    The health and human rights movement (HHR) shows obvious signs of maturation both internally and externally. Yet there are still many questions to be addressed. These issues include the movement’s epistemological status and its perspectives of development. This paper discusses critically the conditions of emergence of HHR, its identity, its dominant schools of thought, its epistemological postures and its methodological issues. Our analysis shows that: (a) the epistemological status of HHR is ambiguous; (b) its identity is uncertain in (...)
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  43.  6
    Thomas Faunce (2012). Governing Planetary Nanomedicine: Environmental Sustainability and a UNESCO Universal Declaration on the Bioethics and Human Rights of Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis (Global Solar Fuels and Foods). [REVIEW] NanoEthics 6 (1):15-27.
    Abstract Environmental and public health-focused sciences are increasingly characterised as constituting an emerging discipline—planetary medicine. From a governance perspective, the ethical components of that discipline may usefully be viewed as bestowing upon our ailing natural environment the symbolic moral status of a patient. Such components emphasise, for example, the origins and content of professional and social virtues and related ethical principles needed to promote global governance systems and policies that reduce ecological stresses and pathologies derived from human overpopulation, selfishness (...)
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  44. Yvanka B. Raynova (2015). Human Rights, Women's Rights, Gender Mainstreaming, and Diversity: The Language Question. In Community, Praxis, and Values in a Postmetaphysical Age: Studies on Exclusion and Social Integration in Feminist Theory and Contemporary Philosophy. Axia Academic Publisher 38-89.
    In the following study the author goes back to the beginnings of the Women's Rights movements in order to pose the question on gender equality by approaching it through the prism of language as a powerful tool in human rights battles. This permits her to show the deep interrelation between women's struggle for recognition and some particular women rights, like the "feminization" of professional titles and the implementation of a gender sensitive language. Hence she argues (...)
     
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  45.  32
    Charles R. Beitz (2009). The Idea of Human Rights. OUP Oxford.
    The international doctrine of human rights is one of the most ambitious parts of the settlement of World War II. Since then, the language of human rights has become the common language of social criticism in global political life. This book is a theoretical examination of the central idea of that language, the idea of a human right. In contrast to more conventional philosophical studies, the author takes a practical approach, looking at the history (...)
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  46.  61
    Oliver O'Donovan (2009). The Language of Rights and Conceptual History. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):193-207.
    The historical problem about the origins of the language of rights derives its importance from the conceptual problem: of "two fundamentally different ways of thinking about justice," which is basic? Is justice unitary or plural? This in turn opens up a problem about the moral status of human nature. A narrative of the origins of "rights" is an account of how and when a plural concept of justice comes to the fore, and will be based on the (...)
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  47.  6
    Jason Blakely (2013). How Charles Taylor Philosophizes with History: A Review of Dilemmas and Connections. [REVIEW] Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):231-243.
    Charles Taylor’s latest collection of essays, Dilemmas and Connections, is the most recent installment in his development of a grand history of the rise of a modern, secular age. In this review, I show how the historical narrative that defines Taylor’s late work is in continuity with his earlier hermeneutic commitments, while also allowing him to advance new inquiries into areas as diverse as secularism, religion, nationalism, and human rights discourse. I do this by not only providing (...)
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  48. Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty (2000). What is a Fair Trial? Rape Prosecutions, Disclosure and the Human Rights Act. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (2):143-167.
    This article engages with the vogue for predicting the effects of the Human Rights Act 1998 by focusing on the rape prosecution and trial. The specific interest is feminist scrutiny of the right to a fair trial, particularly the concept of ‘fairness’, in light of the increasing use of disclosure rules (in Canada and England) to gain access to medical and counseling records. Transcending the two contemporary narratives of ‘victims’/women’s rights and defendants’ rights in the criminal (...)
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  49. Clark Butler (ed.) (1997). History as the Story of Freedom: Philosophy in Intercultural Context. Rodopi.
    The purpose of this book is to advance responsible rehabilitation of the speculative philosophy of history. It challenges the idea popularized by thinkers such as and Claude Lévi-Strauss and Jean-François Lyotard that historical meta-mythology and meta-narrative are philosophically obsolete. As long as humanity, viewed anthropologically, lives by over-arching narrative, the quest for a version that survives rational criticism remains vital. Here human rights serve as the key to unlock such a version. Despite the fact that the Hegelian (...)
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  50.  68
    Denis G. Arnold (2010). Transnational Corporations and the Duty to Respect Basic Human Rights. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):371-399.
    In a series of reports the United Nations Special Representative on the issue of Human Rights and Transnational Corporations has emphasized a tripartite framework regarding business and human rights that includes the state “duty to protect,” the TNC “responsibility to respect,” and “appropriate remedies” for human rights violations. This article examines the recent history of UN initiatives regarding business and human rights and places the tripartite framework in historical context. Three approaches (...)
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