Search results for 'Human rights History of doctrines' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Chapter11 Human (2012). Human Rights as Technologies of the Self: Creating the European Governmentable Subject of Rights. In Ben Golder (ed.), Re-Reading Foucault: On Law, Power and Rights. Routledge. 229.score: 906.0
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  2. Hans Christian Günther & Andrea A. Robiglio (eds.) (2010). The European Image of God and Man: A Contribution to the Debate on Human Rights. Brill.score: 240.6
     
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  3. Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.score: 213.6
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of (...)
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  4. Abraham Magendzo Kolstrein (2011). Why Are We Involved in Human Rights and Moral Education? Educators as Constructors of Our Own History. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):289-297.score: 199.8
    My professional interest originally focused on curriculum planning and development, but for the last 30 years I have been researching, publishing and teaching in the field of human rights education. Suddenly, I became a human rights educator. Suddenly? No, nothing in our personal and professional life is the result of an abrupt occurrence. We are subjects of a particular history, a succession of events and narratives, located in time, space and circumstances. I constructed myself, consciously (...)
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  5. Toma Birmontiene (2010). Intersection of the Jurisprudences. The European Convention on Human Rights and the Constitutional Doctrine Formulated by the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Lithuania. Jurisprudence 119 (1):7-27.score: 197.2
    The article discusses the certain features of the constitutional doctrine of human rights developed by the Constitutional Court of Lithuania which were influenced by the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, the role of the European Convention on Human Rights as a legal source in the system of sources of constitutional law. The intersection of the jurisprudences, which came into being due to different assessments of the legal regulation in cases where the (...)
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  6. John Mahoney (2007). The Challenge of Human Rights: Origin, Development, and Significance. Blackwell Pub..score: 191.4
    The Challenge of Human Rights traces the history of human rights theory from classical antiquity through the enlightenment to the modern human rights movement, and analyses the significance of human rights in today’s increasingly globalized world. Provides an engaging study of the origin and the philosophical and political development of human rights discourse. Offers an original defence of human rights. Explores the significance of human rights (...)
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  7. Deryck Beyleveld (2012). The Principle of Generic Consistency as the Supreme Principle of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (1):1-18.score: 182.4
    Alan Gewirth’s claim that agents contradict that they are agents if they do not accept that the principle of generic consistency (PGC) is the supreme principle of practical rationality has been greeted with widespread scepticism. The aim of this article is not to defend this claim but to show that if the first and least controversial of the three stages of Gewirth’s argument for the PGC is sound, then agents must interpret and give effect to human rights in (...)
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  8. Courtney Hillebrecht (2012). Implementing International Human Rights Law at Home: Domestic Politics and the European Court of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (3):279-301.score: 182.4
    The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) boasts one of the strongest oversight systems in international human rights law, but implementing the ECtHR’s rulings is an inherently domestic and political process. This article begins to bridge the gap between the Court in Strasbourg and the domestic process of implementing the Court’s rulings by looking at the domestic institutions and politics that surround the execution of the ECtHR’s judgments. Using case studies from the UK and Russia, this (...)
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  9. Elena Pariotti (2009). International Soft Law, Human Rights and Non-State Actors: Towards the Accountability of Transnational Corporations? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (2):139-155.score: 182.4
    During this age of globalisation, the law is characterised by an ever diminishing hierarchical framework, with an increasing role played by non-state actors. Such features are also pertinent for the international enforceability of human rights. With respect to human rights, TNCs seem to be given broadening obligations, which approach the borderline between ethics and law. The impact of soft law in this context is also relevant. This paper aims to assess whether, and to what extent, this (...)
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  10. David L. Richards & K. Chad Clay (2012). An Umbrella With Holes: Respect for Non-Derogable Human Rights During Declared States of Emergency, 1996–2004. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 13 (4):443-471.score: 182.4
    This paper examines the effects of non-derogability status for seven human rights during declared states of emergency from 1996 to 2004 in 195 countries. For this purpose, we create several original measures of countries’ state of emergency status. Our analysis finds the intended protections from the special legal status of non-derogable rights to be anemic, at best, during declared emergencies. This finding begs a reconsideration of both the utility of the “non-derogable” categorization in both international and municipal (...)
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  11. Freek van der Vet (2012). Seeking Life, Finding Justice: Russian NGO Litigation and Chechen Disappearances Before the European Court of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (3):303-325.score: 182.4
    This article presents findings from an interview study of human rights practitioners who assist relatives of the disappeared from Chechnya with their complaints before the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). These practitioners work for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The study contributes to the scant literature on NGO litigation before the ECtHR and to the social scientific literature on how human rights are actively practiced. It investigates the NGOs’ intermediary position between the ECtHR and the (...)
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  12. Solveiga Cirtautienė (2013). Impact of Human Rights on Private Law in Lithuania and Other European Countries: Problematic Aspects. Jurisprudence 20 (1):77-90.score: 176.2
    The aim of this article is to investigate the problem how and to what extent human rights affect the relationships between private parties and what consequences this effect has for the development of private law in Lithuania and other European countries. Because Lithuanian legal doctrine lacks relevant research on this subject-matter, the author seeks to start and invoke the beginning of conceptual academic discourse on the matter. It is argued that despite the fact that in many countries the (...)
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  13. Ann Elizabeth Mayer (2009). Human Rights as a Dimension of CSR: The Blurred Lines Between Legal and Non-Legal Categories. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):561 - 577.score: 172.8
    At the UN, important projects laying down transnational corporations' (TNCs) human rights responsibilities have been launched without ever clarifying the relevant theoretical foundations. One of the consequences is that the human rights principles in projects like the 2000 UN Global Compact and the 2003 Norms on the Responsibilities of Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises with Regard to Human Rights can be understood in different ways, which should not cause surprise given that their authors (...)
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  14. S. Prakash Sethi, David B. Lowry, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova (2011). Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc.: An Innovative Voluntary Code of Conduct to Protect Human Rights, Create Employment Opportunities, and Economic Development of the Indigenous People. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):1-30.score: 172.8
    Environmental degradation and extractive industry are inextricably linked, and the industry’s adverse impact on air, water, and ground resources has been exacerbated with increased demand for raw materials and their location in some of the more environmentally fragile areas of the world. Historically, companies have managed to control calls for regulation and improved, i.e., more expensive, mining technologies by (a) their importance in economic growth and job creation or (b) through adroit use of their economic power and bargaining leverage against (...)
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  15. Mark Engler (2000). Toward the "Rights of the Poor": Human Rights in Liberation Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):339 - 365.score: 172.2
    In this article, the author traces the response of liberation theologians to human rights initiatives through three distinct stages over the past thirty years: from an initial avoidance of the concept, to an early critique, and then to a nuanced theological appropriation. He contends that liberation theology brings a thoroughgoing concern for the poor and an innovative methodology of historicization to the discussion of human rights. In clarifying the treatment of human rights within a (...)
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  16. Gabriel Andreescu & Liviu Andreescu (2010). The European Court of Human Rights' Lautsi Decision: Context, Contents, Consequences. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (26):47-74.score: 172.2
    The paper discusses the context, substance and likely implications of the European Court of Human Rights’ very recent but, in our view, historic decision in the case of Lautsi v. Italy. The article offers an outline of the case and of the decision’s motivation, a presentation of the responses, and a brief discussion of its relevance to the similar Romanian case. We examine in some detail the objections leveled against the ruling, track the progress of the Court’s relevant (...)
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  17. Virgil Ciomos (2010). The Deterritorialization of Human Rights. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):17-27.score: 172.2
    The jurisdiction of Human Rights finds itself in a paradoxical situation for, on the one hand, these rights are affirmed as universal and, on the other, they emerged from within the boundaries of certain determinate states. That is why Western modernity is marked by a tension between the primary, determined territory proper to the emergence of human right and their universal, world calling. With regard to this tension the present study focuses on several key issues in (...)
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  18. Lutz Preuss & Donna Brown (2012). Business Policies on Human Rights: An Analysis of Their Content and Prevalence Among FTSE 100 Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):289-299.score: 172.2
    The new millennium has witnessed a growing concern over the impact of multinational enterprises (MNEs) on human rights. Hence, this article explores (1) how wide-spread corporate policies on human rights are amongst large corporations, specifically the FTSE 100 constituent firms, (2) whether any sectors are particularly active in designing human rights policies and (3) where corporations have adopted such policies what their content is. In terms of adoption rates of human rights policies, (...)
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  19. Adam Etinson (2013). Human Rights, Claimability and the Uses of Abstraction. Utilitas 25 (4):463-486.score: 169.2
    This article addresses the so-called to human rights. Focusing specifically on the work of Onora O'Neill, the article challenges two important aspects of her version of this objection. First: its narrowness. O'Neill understands the claimability of a right to depend on the identification of its duty-bearers. But there is good reason to think that the claimability of a right depends on more than just that, which makes abstract (and not welfare) rights the most natural target of her (...)
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  20. Adam Etinson (2010). To Be or Not to Be: Charles Beitz on the Philosophy of Human Rights. Res Publica 16 (4):441-448.score: 169.2
    This is a review article of Charles Beitz's 2009 book on the philosophy of human rights, The Idea of Human Rights. The article provides a charitable overview of the book's main arguments, but also raises some doubts about the depth of the distinction between Beitz's 'practical' approach to humans rights and its 'naturalistic' counterparts.
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  21. Ian Leigh (2011). Damned If They Do, Damned If They Don't: The European Court of Human Rights and the Protection of Religion From Attack. Res Publica 17 (1):55-73.score: 169.2
    The approach of the European Court of Human Rights to cases of religiously offensive expression is inconsistent and unsatisfactory. A critical analysis of the Court’s jurisprudence on blasphemy, religious insult and religious hatred identifies three problems with its approach in this field. These are: the embellishment and over-emphasis of freedom of religion, the use of the margin of appreciation and the devaluing of some forms of offensive speech. Nevertheless, it is possible to defend a more coherent approach to (...)
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  22. Aistė Račkauskaitė-Burneikienė (2013). The Impact of General Human Rights on the Protection of Persons Belonging to National Minorities. Jurisprudence 20 (3):923-950.score: 169.2
    The protection of national minorities forms a constituent part of the international protection of human rights. General human rights treaties (the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and others) create guarantees for the protection of persons belonging to national minorities on the basis of individual human rights. Although the mentioned (...)
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  23. Jonas Juškevičius & Janina Balsienė (2010). On Human Rights in Healthcare: Some Remarks on Limits of the Right to Healthcare. Jurisprudence 122 (4):95-110.score: 169.2
    Notwithstanding the expectations related to the ‘invasion’ of human rights into the field of healthcare, the complexity of this field raises some problematic questions about the applicability of such a legal instrument. The present paper analyses the possible limits to the content of the core right to healthcare. These limits are discussed through the examination of two normative pillars of health law: the right to individual self-determination (or the principle of individual autonomy) and the right to healthcare itself. (...)
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  24. S. Brincat (2009). 'Death to Tyrants": Self-Defence, Human Rights and Tyrannicide - Part II. Journal of International Political Theory 5 (1):75-93.score: 169.2
    This is the final part of a series of two papers that have examined the conceptual development of the philosophical justifications for tyrannicide. While Part I focused on the classical, medieval, and liberal justifications for tyrannicide, Part II aims to provide the tentative outlines of a contemporary model of tyrannicide in world politics. It is contended that a reinvigorated conception of self-defence, when coupled with the modern understanding of universal human rights, may provide the foundation for the normative (...)
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  25. Francesco De Santis di Nicola (2011). Principle of Subsidiarity and 'Embeddedness' of the European Convention on Human Rights in the Field of the Reasonable-Time Requirement: The Italian Case. Jurisprudence 18 (1):7-32.score: 169.2
    The right to ‘domestic remedies’, which ideally connects ‘subsidiarity’ and ‘embeddedness’ of the ECHR in the legal systems of member States, is deemed to play a crucial role for the Strasbourg machinery survival as well as for an effective protection of human rights, especially in the field of the ‘reasonable-time’ requirement. In this respect the Italian case seems an excellent test. Once a compensatory remedy was introduced in the Italian legal system by Law No. 80 of 2001 (the (...)
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  26. Edita Gruodytė (2012). Legal Aspects of Regulation of Abortion in the Context of Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (2):739-752.score: 169.2
    Regulatory approach to the right to abortion in Europe is diverse and basically related to the issue of when the right to life begins and how this question is reflected in national legislation. Such an approach and diversity is tolerated by the European Court of Human Rights, but only if some specific standards and criteria formulated in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights are reflected in national legislation. Research of the Lithuanian legal acts (...)
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  27. Justinas Žilinskas & Dovilė Gailiūtė (2012). Review of Judgments of the European Court of Human Rights in Cases Against the Republic of Lithuania in 2011. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 19 (1):369-390.score: 169.2
    In 2011 the European Court of Human Rights delivered 10 judgments in cases against the Republic of Lithuania. In 9 judgments the Court found at least one violation of rights and freedoms guaranteed by the European Convention on Human Rights. Article 6 which provides the right to a fair trial, remains dominant in the applications against Lithuania, since in 7 out of 10 delivered judgments the Court declared violations of Article 6 (mostly paragraph 1 concerning (...)
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  28. Danutė Jočienė (2010). Protection of Human Rights under the European Convention on Human Rights and the European Union Law (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 121 (3):97-113.score: 169.2
    The system of the European Convention on Human Rights created in 1950 is still regarded as the most important and effective regional system for the protection of human rights in the whole world. However, the experience of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has clearly showed that the steady growth in the number of cases brought before the ECHR makes it increasingly difficult to keep the length of proceedings within the acceptable limits and (...)
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  29. Saulius Katuoka & Andrius Bambalas (2011). Review of Decisions of the European Court of Human Rights in Cases Against the Republic of Lithuania in 2010. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 18 (4):1641-1657.score: 169.2
    This article presents the review of the cases decided by the European Court of Human Rights against Lithuania during 2010. Authors provide the summary of relevant cases so that the potential reader is updated with the latest developments of human rights protection concerning Lithuania. Among other cases, this article reviews the case Cudak v. Lithuania decided by the Grand Chamber, which clarified the issues of restrictive principle of State immunity in employment disputes.
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  30. Stefan Kirchner (2012). The Confessional Secret Between State Law and Canon Law and the Right to Freedom of Religion Under Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1317-1326.score: 169.2
    Within the Irish government there is a discussion regarding the possibility of limiting the legal protection afforded to the confessional secret. This paper addresses the question of whether this suggestion, if it were to be implemented by the legislature, would be compatible with the right to religious freedom under Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). This text will also highlight the role of the confessional secret in canon law and the protection of it under (...)
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  31. Stephen P. Marks (forthcoming). Human Rights and the Challenges of Science and Technology. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-7.score: 169.2
    The expansion of the corpus of international human rights to include the right to water and sanitation has implications both for the process of recognizing human rights and for future developments in the relationships between technology, engineering and human rights. Concerns with threats to human rights resulting from developments in science and technology were expressed in the early days of the United Nations (UN), along with the recognition of the ambitious human (...)
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  32. Marek Piechowiak (2007). Służebność państwa wobec człowieka i jego praw jako naczelna idea Konstytucji RP z 2 kwietnia 1997 roku – osiągnięcie czy zadanie? [Subordination of the State to the Individual and to Human Rights as a Central Idea of Poland’s Constitution of 2 April 1997: A Goal or an Achievement?]. Przegląd Sejmowy 15 (4 (81)):65-91.score: 169.2
    The article deals with relations between the individual and human rights on the one hand, and the State on the other, in the context of the Constitution of the Republic of Poland. The author poses the question whether the idea of subordination of the State to the individual is really a central idea of that constitution. He puts forward many arguments against such suggestion. These arguments relate, above all, to the arrangement of the constitution: a chapter concerning (...) rights is chapter II, while chapter I deals with foundation of the State; the goals of the State are specified in the preamble including the following initial phrase “the existence and future of Poland as our Homeland” and in Article 5 where human rights are as subject of protection by the State is mentioned after independence and integrity of [its] territory; a general concept of human rights protection adopted in the constitution is dominated by the structures typical of law in its objective sense; the way of regulation admissible limitations on human rights differs from international standards; possibility of claiming human rights is constitutionally guaranteed, mostly by constitutional complaint which is above all aimed at correction of legal system, rather than claiming of rights by the individual; Article 1 (“The Republic of Poland shall be the common good of all its citizens”) interpreted as referring to Article 1 paragraph 1 of the April Constitution of 1935, one of the main ideas of which was precedence of the State over the individual. He also analyses the arguments in favour of the recognition of the idea of subordination of the State. Nevertheless, they cannot be accepted as resolving the question of whether it is a central idea of the constitution. These arguments include in particular: the principle of subsidiarity contained in the preamble, even if it has not been appropriately emphasized there; recognition of inherent and inalienable dignity of the person, but it was not until Article 30 that this provision has been contained and it does not determine the relations between the human dignity and rights and the State. The author suggests that the only conclusive way to justify the subordination of the State in relation to the individual as a central idea of the constitution is by means of Article 1. Taking into account, above all, preparatory work, we should reject the interpretation of that article referring to the April (1935) Constitution. Essential interpretative context may be found in preparatory work and social teachings of the Catholic Church, referred to therein. In that case, the common good means the entirety of the conditions of social life which favour the human development. These conditions include above all the respect for human dignity. Such interpretation of Article 1 gives priority to proposals on what the State should be to serve the individual rather than to safeguard obligations of citizens in relation to the State. (shrink)
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  33. Indrė Pukanasytė (2009). Some Aspects Related to the Interpretation of the Right to Free Elections in the Case-Law of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 115 (1):155-182.score: 169.2
    The paper focuses on the general principles established in the caselaw of the European Court of Human Rights while applying and interpreting the Article 3 of the First Protocol of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms which provides: „The High Contracting Parties undertake to hold free elections at reasonable intervals by secret ballot, under conditions which will ensure the free expression of the opinion of the people in the choice of the (...)
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  34. Martin Reufels & Karl Molle (2012). Labour Law Within the Recent Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1567-1583.score: 169.2
    The article deals with the impact of the recent jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on the German labour law practice. After a brief introduction of the general importance of the jurisprudence of the ECHR for the German labour law (I.), the authors illustrate the German and the ECHR’s jurisprudence on the duty of loyalty towards the ecclesiastic employer (II.) and whistle blowing (III.). Analysing this jurisprudence, the authors come to the conclusion that the ECHR (...)
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  35. Lijana Štarienė (2009). The Limits of the Use of Undercover Agents and the Right to a Fair Trial Under Article 6(1) of the European Convention on Human Rights. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 117 (3):263-284.score: 169.2
    Various special investigative methods are more often applied nowadays; their use is unavoidably induced by today’s reality in combating organised crime in the spheres such as corruption, prostitution, drug trafficking, trafficking in persons, money counterfeit and etc. Therefore, special secret investigative methods are more often used and they are very effective in gathering evidence for the purpose of detecting and investigating very well-organised or latent crimes. Both the Convention on the Protection on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms itself, (...)
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  36. Lijana Štarienė (2010). Cudak V. Lithuania and the European Court of Human Rights Approach to the State Immunity Doctrine. Jurisprudence 120 (2):159-175.score: 162.8
    The application of the state immunity doctrine with regard to the guarantee of access to court in the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights has been proved to be a complicated issue. In the ECHR’s case-law before the case Cudak v. Lithuania, the application of the state immunity doctrine had been considered as a proportionate restriction of the right of access to court even in cases of the realization of the protection of the jus cogens norm (...)
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  37. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2009). Narrative Structures, Narratives of Abuse, and Human Rights. In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non- Ideal. Kluwer.score: 160.2
    This paper explores the relation between victims’ stories and normativity. As a contribution to understanding how the stories of those who have been abused or oppressed can advance moral understanding, catalyze moral innovation, and guide social change, this paper focuses on narrative as a variegated form of representation and asks whether personal narratives of victimization play any distinctive role in human rights discourse. In view of the fact that a number of prominent students of narrative build normativity into (...)
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  38. Thomas Faunce (2012). Governing Planetary Nanomedicine: Environmental Sustainability and a UNESCO Universal Declaration on the Bioethics and Human Rights of Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis (Global Solar Fuels and Foods). [REVIEW] Nanoethics 6 (1):15-27.score: 160.2
    Abstract Environmental and public health-focused sciences are increasingly characterised as constituting an emerging discipline—planetary medicine. From a governance perspective, the ethical components of that discipline may usefully be viewed as bestowing upon our ailing natural environment the symbolic moral status of a patient. Such components emphasise, for example, the origins and content of professional and social virtues and related ethical principles needed to promote global governance systems and policies that reduce ecological stresses and pathologies derived from human overpopulation, selfishness (...)
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  39. Emmanuel Kabengele Mpinga, Leslie London & Philippe Chastonay (2011). Health and Human Rights: Epistemological Status and Perspectives of Development. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):237-247.score: 160.2
    The health and human rights movement (HHR) shows obvious signs of maturation both internally and externally. Yet there are still many questions to be addressed. These issues include the movement’s epistemological status and its perspectives of development. This paper discusses critically the conditions of emergence of HHR, its identity, its dominant schools of thought, its epistemological postures and its methodological issues. Our analysis shows that: (a) the epistemological status of HHR is ambiguous; (b) its identity is uncertain in (...)
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  40. Robin Redhead & Nick Turnbull (2011). Towards a Study of Human Rights Practitioners. Human Rights Review 12 (2):173-189.score: 159.4
    The expansion of human rights provisions has produced an increasing number of human rights practitioners and delineated human rights as a field of its own. Questions of who is practicing human rights and how they practice it have become important. This paper considers the question of human rights practice and the agency of practitioners, arguing that practice should not be conceived as the application of philosophy, but instead approached from a (...)
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  41. Oliver O'Donovan (2009). The Language of Rights and Conceptual History. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):193-207.score: 157.2
    The historical problem about the origins of the language of rights derives its importance from the conceptual problem: of "two fundamentally different ways of thinking about justice," which is basic? Is justice unitary or plural? This in turn opens up a problem about the moral status of human nature. A narrative of the origins of "rights" is an account of how and when a plural concept of justice comes to the fore, and will be based on the (...)
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  42. Toma Birmontienė (2012). The Influence of Economic Crisis on the Constitutional Doctrine of Social Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (3):1005-1030.score: 156.6
    The article underlines the significance of social rights as important constitutional rights of a human being and emphasises the peculiarities of their nature from the point of view of not only national, but also international law. The article presents an analysis of the constitutional doctrine of the protection of guarantees of social rights, which has been formulated by the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Lithuania in the course of considering the issues of reduction of social (...)
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  43. Loreta Šaltinytė (2010). European Union Accession to the European Convention on Human Rights: Stronger Protection of Fundamental Rights in Europe? Jurisprudence 120 (2):177-196.score: 153.8
    The treaty of Lisbon makes European Union (EU) accession to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) an obligation of result. The issue has been intensely discussed for more than thirty years, arguing that such accession is necessary in view of the need to ensure the ECHR standard of fundamental rights protection in Europe. This question again gains prominence as the EU member states and the institutions seek to agree on the negotiation directives of EU accession to (...)
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  44. Alisa Clarke (2012). The Potential of the Human Rights-Based Approach for the Evolution of the United Nations as a System. Human Rights Review 13 (2):225-248.score: 153.0
    The United Nations (UN), facing increasingly intense challenges in the fulfillment of its mission, also harbors the potential for enhanced effectiveness, relevance, and legitimacy in the form of the human rights-based approach. The human rights-based approach (HRBA) is one model for translating the organization’s values into a more adaptive, inclusive, dynamic, and responsive system of processes and outcomes. In the arena of politics, its meeting with a meaningful degree of receptiveness could signal a growing acceptance of (...)
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  45. Mark F. N. Franke (2013). A Critique of the Universalisability of Critical Human Rights Theory: The Displacement of Immanuel Kant. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (4):367-385.score: 152.4
    While the critically oriented writings of Immanuel Kant remain the key theoretical grounds from which universalists challenge reduction of international rights law and protection to the practical particularities of sovereign states, Kant’s theory can be read as also a crucial argument for a human rights regime ordered around sovereign states and citizens. Consequently, universalists may be tempted to push Kant’s thinking to greater critical examination of ‘the human’ and its properties. However, such a move to more (...)
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  46. Desh Raj Sirswal (2012). Casteism, Social Security and Violation of Human Rights. In Manoj Kumar (ed.), Human Rights for All.score: 152.4
    The consciousness of social security comes to a man when he feels that he is getting his basic rights. Human Rights are related to those rights which are related to man’s life, freedom, equality and self-esteem, are established by Indian constitution or universal declaration of human rights and implemented by Indian judiciary system. In other words, “Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, (...)
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  47. Veronika Haász (2013). The Role of National Human Rights Institutions in the Implementation of the UN Guiding Principles. Human Rights Review 14 (3):165-187.score: 152.4
    National human rights institutions (NHRIs) are key domestic mechanisms for promotion and protection of human rights. The institutions' broad mandate, competencies, and special status between state and nonstate actors on the one hand, and special status between the national and international levels on the other hand enable them to engage effectively in the field of business and human rights. Since 2009, NHRIs have been engaging with the international human rights system in order (...)
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  48. Claudia Messina & Liliana Jacott (2013). An Exploratory Study of Human Rights Knowledge: A Sample of Kindergarten and Elementary School Pre-Service Teachers in Spain. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (3):213-230.score: 152.4
    This study aims to explore the level of information and knowledge 150 Spanish kindergarten and elementary school teachers in pre-service training have about human rights. We compared two groups of students: students with no specific training and students with specific training (the students with specific training study with the new training teaching programme that includes a compulsory subject related to citizenship education). The contents are organized around three thematic areas. Human rights are included in the first (...)
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  49. Joyce Apsel (2011). Educating a New Generation: The Model of the “Genocide and Human Rights University Program”. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (4):465-486.score: 152.4
    This paper examines the design and teaching of "Genocide and Human Rights," an innovative, higher education course introduced in 2002 to provide training for a new generation of scholars and teachers. The course was developed and funded by a small non-profit organization, the Zoryan Institute, in Toronto, Canada. One purpose of the course is to teach about the Armenian genocide within a comparative genocide and human rights framework. Another goal is to fill a gap in the (...)
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  50. Jodi Finkel (2012). Explaining the Failure of Mexico's National Commission of Human Rights (Ombudsman's Office) After Democratization: Elections, Incentives, and Unaccountability in the Mexican Senate. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 13 (4):473-495.score: 152.4
    Mexico’s ombudsman’s office (the Comision Nacional de Derechos Humanos (CNDH)), established in 1990 by a nondemocratic government, posed no threat to the then ruling party. Counter to expectations, even after Mexico democratized in 2000, the CNDH remained unwilling to challenge officials for human rights violations. I argue that this is because the ombudsman (the head of the CNDH) is chosen by Mexican Senators who are not accountable—due to secret voting and a prohibition on reelection—to the Mexican public. While (...)
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