Search results for 'Human rights History of doctrines' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Chapter11 Human (2012). Human Rights as Technologies of the Self: Creating the European Governmentable Subject of Rights. In Ben Golder (ed.), Re-Reading Foucault: On Law, Power and Rights. Routledge. 229.score: 2718.0
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  2. Hans Christian Günther & Andrea A. Robiglio (eds.) (2010). The European Image of God and Man: A Contribution to the Debate on Human Rights. Brill.score: 1203.0
     
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  3. Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.score: 854.4
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of (...)
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  4. Abraham Magendzo Kolstrein (2011). Why Are We Involved in Human Rights and Moral Education? Educators as Constructors of Our Own History. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):289-297.score: 799.2
    My professional interest originally focused on curriculum planning and development, but for the last 30 years I have been researching, publishing and teaching in the field of human rights education. Suddenly, I became a human rights educator. Suddenly? No, nothing in our personal and professional life is the result of an abrupt occurrence. We are subjects of a particular history, a succession of events and narratives, located in time, space and circumstances. I constructed myself, consciously (...)
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  5. John Mahoney (2007). The Challenge of Human Rights: Origin, Development, and Significance. Blackwell Pub..score: 765.6
    The Challenge of Human Rights traces the history of human rights theory from classical antiquity through the enlightenment to the modern human rights movement, and analyses the significance of human rights in today’s increasingly globalized world. Provides an engaging study of the origin and the philosophical and political development of human rights discourse. Offers an original defence of human rights. Explores the significance of human rights (...)
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  6. S. Brincat (2009). 'Death to Tyrants": Self-Defence, Human Rights and Tyrannicide - Part II. Journal of International Political Theory 5 (1):75-93.score: 676.8
    This is the final part of a series of two papers that have examined the conceptual development of the philosophical justifications for tyrannicide. While Part I focused on the classical, medieval, and liberal justifications for tyrannicide, Part II aims to provide the tentative outlines of a contemporary model of tyrannicide in world politics. It is contended that a reinvigorated conception of self-defence, when coupled with the modern understanding of universal human rights, may provide the foundation for the normative (...)
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  7. Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.score: 676.8
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  8. Toma Birmontiene (2010). Intersection of the Jurisprudences. The European Convention on Human Rights and the Constitutional Doctrine Formulated by the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Lithuania. Jurisprudence 119 (1):7-27.score: 676.0
    The article discusses the certain features of the constitutional doctrine of human rights developed by the Constitutional Court of Lithuania which were influenced by the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, the role of the European Convention on Human Rights as a legal source in the system of sources of constitutional law. The intersection of the jurisprudences, which came into being due to different assessments of the legal regulation in cases where the (...)
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  9. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2009). Narrative Structures, Narratives of Abuse, and Human Rights. In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non- Ideal. Kluwer.score: 640.8
    This paper explores the relation between victims’ stories and normativity. As a contribution to understanding how the stories of those who have been abused or oppressed can advance moral understanding, catalyze moral innovation, and guide social change, this paper focuses on narrative as a variegated form of representation and asks whether personal narratives of victimization play any distinctive role in human rights discourse. In view of the fact that a number of prominent students of narrative build normativity into (...)
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  10. Thomas Faunce (2012). Governing Planetary Nanomedicine: Environmental Sustainability and a UNESCO Universal Declaration on the Bioethics and Human Rights of Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis (Global Solar Fuels and Foods). [REVIEW] Nanoethics 6 (1):15-27.score: 640.8
    Abstract Environmental and public health-focused sciences are increasingly characterised as constituting an emerging discipline—planetary medicine. From a governance perspective, the ethical components of that discipline may usefully be viewed as bestowing upon our ailing natural environment the symbolic moral status of a patient. Such components emphasise, for example, the origins and content of professional and social virtues and related ethical principles needed to promote global governance systems and policies that reduce ecological stresses and pathologies derived from human overpopulation, selfishness (...)
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  11. Emmanuel Kabengele Mpinga, Leslie London & Philippe Chastonay (2011). Health and Human Rights: Epistemological Status and Perspectives of Development. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):237-247.score: 640.8
    The health and human rights movement (HHR) shows obvious signs of maturation both internally and externally. Yet there are still many questions to be addressed. These issues include the movement’s epistemological status and its perspectives of development. This paper discusses critically the conditions of emergence of HHR, its identity, its dominant schools of thought, its epistemological postures and its methodological issues. Our analysis shows that: (a) the epistemological status of HHR is ambiguous; (b) its identity is uncertain in (...)
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  12. Faustina Pereira (2003). Human Rights, Human Wrongs, and the Problem of Multicultural Understanding. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:37-52.score: 637.8
    As a human rights activist and lawyer who believes in the mutuality of theology and legal philosophy, the author argues that Catholic philosophy can catalyse the process of global reconciliation. This is because the Church has the ability to recognise the double burden faced by Christians around the world (especially in Asia) who are struggling to disassociate themselves from an “alien” and “western” mantle, while still trying to live and preach the Christian doctrine and find common ground with (...)
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  13. Shannon Brincat (2008). `Death to Tyrants': The Political Philosophy of Tyrannicide - Part I. Journal of International Political Theory 4 (2):212-240.score: 635.6
    This paper examines the conceptual development of the philosophical justifications for tyrannicide. It posits that the political philosophy of tyrannicide can be categorised into three distinct periods or models, the classical, medieval, and liberal, respectively. It argues that each model contained unique themes and principles that justified tyrannicide in that period; the classical, through the importance attached to public life and the functional role of leadership; the medieval, through natural law doctrine; and the liberal, through the postulates of social contract (...)
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  14. Oliver O'Donovan (2009). The Language of Rights and Conceptual History. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):193-207.score: 628.8
    The historical problem about the origins of the language of rights derives its importance from the conceptual problem: of "two fundamentally different ways of thinking about justice," which is basic? Is justice unitary or plural? This in turn opens up a problem about the moral status of human nature. A narrative of the origins of "rights" is an account of how and when a plural concept of justice comes to the fore, and will be based on the (...)
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  15. Charles R. Beitz (2009). The Idea of Human Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 624.8
    The international doctrine of human rights is one of the most ambitious parts of the settlement of World War II. Since then, the language of human rights has become the common language of social criticism in global political life. This book is a theoretical examination of the central idea of that language, the idea of a human right. In contrast to more conventional philosophical studies, the author takes a practical approach, looking at the history (...)
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  16. George Letsas (2007). A Theory of Interpretation of the European Convention on Human Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 624.8
    Does the right to life under article 2 ECHR include the right to terminate one's life? Does the right to private life under article 8 ECHR include the right to sleep at night free from airplane noise? Does the right to property under article 1 Protocol 1 ECHR entitle the former King of Greece to claim compensation for the expropriation of royal property, following a referendum? Do homosexual couples have a right to adopt under article 8 ECHR? This book looks (...)
     
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  17. Nikolaj Plotnikov (2012). «The Person is a Monad with Windows»: Sketch of a Conceptual History of 'Person' in Russia. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 64 (3-4):269-299.score: 604.8
    The basic concepts 'person' (Person), I/self (Ich) and 'subject' (Subjekt) structuring the Russian discourse of personhood (Personalität) developed during the philosophical discussions of the 1820s-1840s. The development occurred in the course of an intense reception of German Idealism and Romanticism. Characteristic of this process is that the modern meaning of personhood going back to the theological and natural-law interpretations of the person in Western Europe does not exist in the Russian cultural consciousness. Therefore the Russian concepts of personhood demonstrate the (...)
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  18. Abraham Magendzo & María Isabel Toledo (2009). Moral Dilemmas in Teaching Recent History Related to the Violation of Human Rights in Chile. Journal of Moral Education 38 (4):445-465.score: 602.4
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  19. Eric D. Weitz (2013). Samuel Moyn and the New History of Human Rights. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (1):84-93.score: 602.4
  20. Antoon de Baets (2009). The Impact of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the Study of History. History and Theory 48 (1):20-43.score: 602.4
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  21. Paul G. Kauper (1971). A Concise History of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Philosophy and History 4 (2):221-223.score: 602.4
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  22. Burleigh Wilkins (2008). Rawls on Human Rights: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (1):105 - 122.score: 592.8
    In this essay, I first evaluate the conceptual analysis of human rights by Wilfried Hinsch and Markus Stepanians. Next I criticize Allen Buchanan’s claim that Rawls did not address basic human interests/capabilities theories of human nature. I argue Buchanan is doubly mistaken when he claims that John Rawls sought to avoid such theories because they are comprehensive doctrines. Then I evaluate David Reidy’s defense of Rawls, while questioning his efforts to show how Rawls’s list of (...)
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  23. Solveiga Cirtautienė (2013). Impact of Human Rights on Private Law in Lithuania and Other European Countries: Problematic Aspects. Jurisprudence 20 (1):77-90.score: 592.0
    The aim of this article is to investigate the problem how and to what extent human rights affect the relationships between private parties and what consequences this effect has for the development of private law in Lithuania and other European countries. Because Lithuanian legal doctrine lacks relevant research on this subject-matter, the author seeks to start and invoke the beginning of conceptual academic discourse on the matter. It is argued that despite the fact that in many countries the (...)
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  24. Peter Langford (1986). Modern Philosophies of Human Nature: Their Emergence From Christian Thought. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic.score: 590.4
    Chapter 1 : Introduction General Argument My aim is to survey some of the most influential philosophical writers on human nature from the time that ...
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  25. Costas Douzinas (1999). Human Rights at the End of History. Angelaki 4 (1):99 – 114.score: 590.4
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  26. Liisi Keedus (2011). 'Human and Nothing but Human': How Schmittian is Hannah Arendt's Critique of Human Rights and International Law? History of European Ideas 37 (2):190-196.score: 588.0
    (2011). ‘Human and nothing but human’: How Schmittian is Hannah Arendt's critique of human rights and international law? History of European Ideas: Vol. 37, No. 2, pp. 190-196.
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  27. Lijana Štarienė (2010). Cudak V. Lithuania and the European Court of Human Rights Approach to the State Immunity Doctrine. Jurisprudence 120 (2):159-175.score: 572.0
    The application of the state immunity doctrine with regard to the guarantee of access to court in the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights has been proved to be a complicated issue. In the ECHR’s case-law before the case Cudak v. Lithuania, the application of the state immunity doctrine had been considered as a proportionate restriction of the right of access to court even in cases of the realization of the protection of the jus cogens norm (...)
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  28. Everett Ferguson (ed.) (1951/1993). Doctrines of God and Christ in the Early Church. Garland.score: 571.2
    An integrated overview of history The volume in this series are arranged topically to cover biography, literature, doctrines, practices, institutions, worship, missions, and daily life. Archaeology and art as well as writings are drawn on to illuminate the Christian movement in its early centuries. Ample attention is also given to the relation of Christianity to pagan thought and life, to the Roman state, to Judaism, and to doctrines and practices that came to be judged as heretical or (...)
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  29. Sumner B. Twiss (2004). History, Human Rights, and Globalization. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):39-70.score: 568.8
    An illustrative comparison of human rights in 1948 and the contemporary period, attempting to gauge the impact of globalization on changes in the content of human rights (e.g., collective rights, women's rights, right to a healthy environment), major abusers and guarantors of human rights (e.g., state actors, transnational corporations, social movements), and alternative justifications of human rights (e.g., pragmatic agreement, moral intuitionism, overlapping consensus, cross-cultural dialogue).
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  30. Costas Douzinas (2000). The End of Human Rights: Critical Legal Thought at the Turn of the Century. Hart Pub..score: 568.8
     
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  31. Deryck Beyleveld (2012). The Principle of Generic Consistency as the Supreme Principle of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (1):1-18.score: 547.2
    Alan Gewirth’s claim that agents contradict that they are agents if they do not accept that the principle of generic consistency (PGC) is the supreme principle of practical rationality has been greeted with widespread scepticism. The aim of this article is not to defend this claim but to show that if the first and least controversial of the three stages of Gewirth’s argument for the PGC is sound, then agents must interpret and give effect to human rights in (...)
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  32. Courtney Hillebrecht (2012). Implementing International Human Rights Law at Home: Domestic Politics and the European Court of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (3):279-301.score: 547.2
    The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) boasts one of the strongest oversight systems in international human rights law, but implementing the ECtHR’s rulings is an inherently domestic and political process. This article begins to bridge the gap between the Court in Strasbourg and the domestic process of implementing the Court’s rulings by looking at the domestic institutions and politics that surround the execution of the ECtHR’s judgments. Using case studies from the UK and Russia, this (...)
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  33. Mary Brabeck, Maureen Kenny, Sonia Stryker, Terry Tollefson & Margot Sternstrom (1994). Human Rights Education Through the 'Facing History and Ourselves' Program. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):333-347.score: 547.2
    Abstract This study examined the effects of the Facing History and Ourselves (FHAO) human rights program on moral development and psychological functioning. The FHAO curriculum significantly increased 8th grade students? moral reasoning (Rest's 1979 Defining Issues Test) without adversely impacting on their psychological well?being (scores on depression, hopelessness or self?worth inventories). Girls were more empathic and had higher levels of social interest; boys had higher global self?worth scores; there were no differences between boys and girls in their (...)
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  34. Marjaana Kopperi (2007). Comprehensive Doctrines in Human Rights Discussion. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:73-78.score: 547.2
    In the discussion of moral diversity the most influential approaches have been relativism, monism and minimum universalism. In this paper I argue, however, that this kind of general distinction is not as such very helpful. It does not show what is really decisive in those approaches and what is the crucial distinguishing feature among them. The most important issue, I think, is the relationship between rules that guide human beings in their pursuit of the good life and rules that (...)
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  35. Elena Pariotti (2009). International Soft Law, Human Rights and Non-State Actors: Towards the Accountability of Transnational Corporations? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (2):139-155.score: 547.2
    During this age of globalisation, the law is characterised by an ever diminishing hierarchical framework, with an increasing role played by non-state actors. Such features are also pertinent for the international enforceability of human rights. With respect to human rights, TNCs seem to be given broadening obligations, which approach the borderline between ethics and law. The impact of soft law in this context is also relevant. This paper aims to assess whether, and to what extent, this (...)
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  36. Freek van der Vet (2012). Seeking Life, Finding Justice: Russian NGO Litigation and Chechen Disappearances Before the European Court of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (3):303-325.score: 547.2
    This article presents findings from an interview study of human rights practitioners who assist relatives of the disappeared from Chechnya with their complaints before the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). These practitioners work for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The study contributes to the scant literature on NGO litigation before the ECtHR and to the social scientific literature on how human rights are actively practiced. It investigates the NGOs’ intermediary position between the ECtHR and the (...)
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  37. David L. Richards & K. Chad Clay (2012). An Umbrella With Holes: Respect for Non-Derogable Human Rights During Declared States of Emergency, 1996–2004. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 13 (4):443-471.score: 547.2
    This paper examines the effects of non-derogability status for seven human rights during declared states of emergency from 1996 to 2004 in 195 countries. For this purpose, we create several original measures of countries’ state of emergency status. Our analysis finds the intended protections from the special legal status of non-derogable rights to be anemic, at best, during declared emergencies. This finding begs a reconsideration of both the utility of the “non-derogable” categorization in both international and municipal (...)
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  38. Raf Geenens (2008). Democracy, Human Rights and History Reading Lefort. European Journal of Political Theory 7 (3):269-286.score: 547.2
    This article offers an overview of the French political philosopher Claude Lefort's oeuvre, arguing that his work should be read as a normative or even universalist justification of democracy and human rights. The notion of history plays a crucial notion in this enterprise, as Lefort demonstrates that there is an ineluctable 'historical' or 'political' condition of human coexistence, a condition that can only be properly accommodated in a regime of democracy and human rights. This (...)
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  39. Ralph McInerny (1992/2012). Aquinas on Human Action: A Theory of Practice. Catholic University Press.score: 547.2
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  40. Toma Birmontienė (2012). The Influence of Economic Crisis on the Constitutional Doctrine of Social Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (3):1005-1030.score: 546.0
    The article underlines the significance of social rights as important constitutional rights of a human being and emphasises the peculiarities of their nature from the point of view of not only national, but also international law. The article presents an analysis of the constitutional doctrine of the protection of guarantees of social rights, which has been formulated by the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Lithuania in the course of considering the issues of reduction of social (...)
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  41. Edward Demenchonok (2012). Rethinking Kant's Concept of Human Rights as Freedom. Filosofia Unisinos 13 (2 - suppl.).score: 537.6
    The paper examines the current debates regarding the grounding of human rights in a pluralistic, culturally diverse world. It analyses the challenges which come today from certain policies of human rights which instrumentalize them under the pretext of a “global war on terror” and redefi ne them in terms of democracy promotion and regime change, as well as those challenges which come from ideologies which question the core principles of human rights and provoke the (...)
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  42. Robin Redhead & Nick Turnbull (2011). Towards a Study of Human Rights Practitioners. Human Rights Review 12 (2):173-189.score: 536.0
    The expansion of human rights provisions has produced an increasing number of human rights practitioners and delineated human rights as a field of its own. Questions of who is practicing human rights and how they practice it have become important. This paper considers the question of human rights practice and the agency of practitioners, arguing that practice should not be conceived as the application of philosophy, but instead approached from a (...)
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  43. Amar Dhall (2010). On the Philosophy and Legal Theory of Human Rights in Light of Quantum Holism. World Futures 66 (1):1 – 25.score: 535.2
    This article explores the traditional basis of modern human rights doctrines and exposes some of the systemic shortcomings. It then posits that a number of these problems are advanced via integrating some developments in the philosophy of science and substantive scientific research into legal philosophy. This article argues that supervening holism grounded in quantum mechanics provides an alternative basis to human rights by positing an ontological construct that is congruous with many of the wisdom traditions (...)
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  44. Claudio Corradetti (ed.) (2012). Philosophical Dimensions of Human Rights. Some Contemporary Views. Springer.score: 535.2
    Some Contemporary Views Claudio Corradetti ... A more complete history of the relation between modern humanitarianism and human rights remains to be written, and would have to identify the points at which each arose, when they ...
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  45. J. Yacoub (2005). For an Enlargement of Human Rights. Diogenes 52 (2):79-97.score: 535.2
    If we investigate the concept of the universality of human rights, we realize that it is limited and invalid, and that it fails because it is too utopian and unreal. It is not a question of denying that there is a generic human essence, or criticizing human rights from a moral standpoint, but of showing that ‘human rights’ do not really have a universal basis. They are a part of history, and as (...)
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  46. Loreta Šaltinytė (2010). European Union Accession to the European Convention on Human Rights: Stronger Protection of Fundamental Rights in Europe? Jurisprudence 120 (2):177-196.score: 524.0
    The treaty of Lisbon makes European Union (EU) accession to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) an obligation of result. The issue has been intensely discussed for more than thirty years, arguing that such accession is necessary in view of the need to ensure the ECHR standard of fundamental rights protection in Europe. This question again gains prominence as the EU member states and the institutions seek to agree on the negotiation directives of EU accession to (...)
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  47. Ann Elizabeth Mayer (2009). Human Rights as a Dimension of CSR: The Blurred Lines Between Legal and Non-Legal Categories. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):561 - 577.score: 518.4
    At the UN, important projects laying down transnational corporations' (TNCs) human rights responsibilities have been launched without ever clarifying the relevant theoretical foundations. One of the consequences is that the human rights principles in projects like the 2000 UN Global Compact and the 2003 Norms on the Responsibilities of Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises with Regard to Human Rights can be understood in different ways, which should not cause surprise given that their authors (...)
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  48. S. Prakash Sethi, David B. Lowry, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova (2011). Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc.: An Innovative Voluntary Code of Conduct to Protect Human Rights, Create Employment Opportunities, and Economic Development of the Indigenous People. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):1-30.score: 518.4
    Environmental degradation and extractive industry are inextricably linked, and the industry’s adverse impact on air, water, and ground resources has been exacerbated with increased demand for raw materials and their location in some of the more environmentally fragile areas of the world. Historically, companies have managed to control calls for regulation and improved, i.e., more expensive, mining technologies by (a) their importance in economic growth and job creation or (b) through adroit use of their economic power and bargaining leverage against (...)
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  49. Mark Engler (2000). Toward the "Rights of the Poor": Human Rights in Liberation Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):339 - 365.score: 516.6
    In this article, the author traces the response of liberation theologians to human rights initiatives through three distinct stages over the past thirty years: from an initial avoidance of the concept, to an early critique, and then to a nuanced theological appropriation. He contends that liberation theology brings a thoroughgoing concern for the poor and an innovative methodology of historicization to the discussion of human rights. In clarifying the treatment of human rights within a (...)
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  50. Gabriel Andreescu & Liviu Andreescu (2010). The European Court of Human Rights' Lautsi Decision: Context, Contents, Consequences. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (26):47-74.score: 516.6
    The paper discusses the context, substance and likely implications of the European Court of Human Rights’ very recent but, in our view, historic decision in the case of Lautsi v. Italy. The article offers an outline of the case and of the decision’s motivation, a presentation of the responses, and a brief discussion of its relevance to the similar Romanian case. We examine in some detail the objections leveled against the ruling, track the progress of the Court’s relevant (...)
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