Search results for 'Human rights Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christine Chwaszcza (2007). Moral Responsibility and Global Justice: A Human Rights Approach. Nomos.score: 1473.0
  2. Daniel E. Lee (2010). Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization. Cambridge University Press.score: 1358.0
    Machine generated contents note: Prologue; Part I. Philosophical Foundations: 1. Defining human rights in a coherent manner; 2. Near neighbors, distant neighbors and the ethics of globalization; 3. Ethical guidelines for business in an age of globalization; Part II. Practical Applications: 4. Human rights and the ethics of investment in China; 5. Liberia and Firestone: a case study; 6. Free trade, fair trade, and coffee farmers in Ethiopia; 7. Maquiladoras: exploitation, economic opportunity or both?; Part (...)
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  3. Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.score: 1283.0
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
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  4. W. J. Talbott (2010). Human Rights and Human Well-Being. Oxford University Press.score: 1239.0
    The consequentialist project for human rights -- Exceptions to libertarian natural rights -- The main principle -- What is well-being? What is equity? -- The two deepest mysteries in moral philosophy -- Security rights -- Epistemological foundations for the priority of autonomy rights -- The millian epistemological argument for autonomy rights -- Property rights, contract rights, and other economic rights -- Democratic rights -- Equity rights -- The most (...)
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  5. Toni Samek (2007). Librarianship and Human Rights: A Twenty-First Century Guide. Chandos.score: 1233.0
    Forward - Prefacio - Acknowledgments - Preface - About the author - Part One: the rhetoric - An urgent context for twenty-first century librarianship - Human rights, contestations and moral responsibilities of library and information workers - Part Two: the reality - Practical strategies for social action - Prevalent manifestations of social action applied to library and information work - Specific forms of social action used in library and information work for social change - Closing thought.
     
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  6. Andrés Ollero (ed.) (2007). Human Rights and Ethics: Proceedings of the 22nd Ivr World Congress, Granada 2005, Volume Iii = Derechos Humanos y Ética. [REVIEW] Franz Steiner Verlag.score: 1228.0
     
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  7. David J. Rothman (2006). Trust is Not Enough: Bringing Human Rights to Medicine. New York Review Books.score: 1158.0
    Addresses the issues at the heart of international medicine and social responsibility. A number of international declarations have proclaimed that health care is a fundamental human right. But if we accept this broad commitment, how should we concretely define the state’s responsibility for the health of its citizens? Although there is growing debate over this issue, there are few books for general readers that provide engaging accounts of critical incidents, practices, and ideas in the field of human (...), health care, and medicine. Included in the book are case studies of such issues as AIDS among orphans in Romania, organ trafficking, prison conditions, health care rationing, medical research in the third world, and South Africa’s constitutionally guaranteed right of access to health care. It uses these topics to address themes of protection of vulnerable populations, equity and fairness in delivering competent medical care, informed consent and the free flow of information, and state responsibility for ensuring physical, mental, and social well-being. (shrink)
     
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  8. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 1134.4
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
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  9. Barbara Rose Johnston & Susan Slyomovics (eds.) (2009). Waging War, Making Peace: Reparations and Human Rights. Left Coast Press.score: 1098.0
     
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  10. Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka (2011). Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 1007.0
    Zoopolis offers a new agenda for the theory and practice of animal rights. Most animal rights theory focuses on the intrinsic capacities or interests of animals, and the moral status and moral rights that these intrinsic characteristics give rise to. Zoopolis shifts the debate from the realm of moral theory and applied ethics to the realm of political theory, focusing on the relational obligations that arise from the varied ways that animals relate to (...) societies and institutions. Building on recent developments in the political theory of group-differentiated citizenship, Zoopolis introduces us to the genuine "political animal". It argues that different types of animals stand in different relationships to human political communities. Domesticated animals should be seen as full members of human-animal mixed communities, participating in the cooperative project of shared citizenship. Wilderness animals, by contrast, form their own sovereign communities entitled to protection against colonization, invasion, domination and other threats to self-determination. `Liminal' animals who are wild but live in the midst of human settlement (such as crows or raccoons) should be seen as "denizens", resident of our societies, but not fully included in rights and responsibilities of citizenship. To all of these animals we owe respect for their basic inviolable rights. But we inevitably and appropriately have very different relations with them, with different types of obligations. Humans and animals are inextricably bound in a complex web of relationships, and Zoopolis offers an original and profoundly affirmative vision of how to ground this complex web of relations on principles of justice and compassion. (shrink)
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  11. George G. Brenkert (2009). Google, Human Rights, and Moral Compromise. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):453 - 478.score: 995.2
    International business faces a host of difficult moral conflicts. It is tempting to think that these conflicts can be morally resolved if we gained full knowledge of the situations, were rational enough, and were sufficiently objective. This paper explores the view that there are situations in which people in business must confront the possibility that they must compromise some of their important principles or values in order to protect other ones. One particularly interesting case that captures this kind of (...)
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  12. Edmund F. Byrne (2014). Towards Enforceable Bans on Illicit Businesses: From Moral Relativism to Human Rights. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):119-130.score: 990.4
    Many scholars and activists favor banning illicit businesses, especially given that such businesses constitute a large part of the global economy. But these businesses are commonly operated as if they are subject only to the ethical norms their management chooses to recognize, and as a result they sometimes harm innocent people. This can happen in part because there are no effective legal constraints on illicit businesses, and in part because it seems theoretically impossible to dispose definitively of arguments that (...)
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  13. D. Forrest (1999). The Human Rights, Ethical and Moral Dimensions of Health Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):356-357.score: 988.0
  14. W. J. Talbott (2005). Which Rights Should Be Universal? Oxford University Press.score: 984.0
    "We hold these truths to be self-evident..." So begins the U.S. Declaration of Independence. What follows those words is a ringing endorsement of universal rights, but it is far from self-evident. Why did the authors claim that it was? William Talbott suggests that they were trapped by a presupposition of Enlightenment philosophy: That there was only one way to rationally justify universal truths, by proving them from self-evident premises. With the benefit of hindsight, it is clear that the authors (...)
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  15. Scott Veitch (2007). Law and Irresponsibility: On the Legitimation of Human Suffering. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 978.0
    It is commonly understood that in its focus on rights and obligations law is centrally concerned with organising responsibility. In defining how obligations are created, in contract or property law, say, or imposed, as in tort, public, or criminal law, law and legal institutions are usually seen as society’s key mode of asserting and defining the content and scope of responsibilities. This book takes the converse view: legal institutions are centrally involved in organising irresponsibility. Particularly with respect to the (...)
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  16. Christopher Robert Kaczor (2010). The Ethics of Abortion: Women's Rights, Human Life, and the Question of Justice. Routledge.score: 917.0
    Appealing to reason rather than religious belief, this book is the most comprehensive case against the choice of abortion yet published.
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  17. Sheldon Ekland-Olson (2013). Life and Death Decisions: The Quest for Morality and Justice in Human Societies. Routledge.score: 917.0
    Based on the author's award-winning and hugely popular undergraduate course at the University of Texas, this book explores these questions and the fundamentally sociological processes which underlie the quest for morality and justice in ...
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  18. Alma Acevedo (2012). Personalist Business Ethics and Humanistic Management: Insights From Jacques Maritain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):197-219.score: 883.0
    The integration of personalism into business ethics has been recently studied. Research has also been conducted on humanistic management approaches. The conceptual relationship between personalism and humanism , however, has not been fully addressed. This article furthers that research by arguing that a true humanistic management is personalistic. Moreover, it claims that personalism is promising as a sound philosophical foundation for business ethics. Insights from Jacques Maritain’s work are discussed in support of these conclusions. Of particular interest is his distinction (...)
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  19. Stephen Thomas Newmyer (2006). Animals, Rights, and Reason in Plutarch and Modern Ethics. Routledge.score: 882.0
    Plutarch is virtually unique in surviving classical authors in arguing that animals are rational and sentient, and in concluding that human beings must take notice of their interests. Stephen Newmyer explores Plutarch's three animal-related treatises, as well as passages from his other ethical treatises, which argue that non-human animals are rational and therefore deserve to fall within the sphere of human moral concern. Newmyer shows that some of the arguments Plutarch raises strikingly foreshadow those found (...)
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  20. Simeon O. Ilesanmi (1995). Human Rights Discourse in Modern Africa: A Comparative Religious Ethical Perspective. Journal of Religious Ethics 23 (2):293 - 322.score: 874.2
    Contemporary discourse on human rights in Africa constitutes an important and controversial aspect of the general discourse on African society and culture. I begin by examining the idea of human rights as a moral category and discuss its pertinence to African cultural and political life. I then analyze and discuss the two dominant positions in the current debate, namely, the communitarian and the individualist theses. I argue that both positions are inadequate because they dissociate dimensions (...)
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  21. Mathias Thaler (2008). Moralische Politik oder politische Moral? Eine Analyse aktueller Debatten zur internationalen Gerechtigkeit. Campus.score: 843.0
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  22. Mylan Engel (2010). The Philosophy of Animal Rights: A Brief Introduction for Students and Teachers. Lantern Books.score: 837.0
    The book also contains an extensive bibliography of references and philosophical resources.
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  23. Alan Herscovici (1985/1991). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.score: 837.0
  24. Sheila McLean (2007). Impairment and Disability: Law and Ethics at the Beginning and End of Life. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 802.0
    pt. 1. Background you need. -- What is brain-compatible teaching -- The old and new of it -- When brain research is applied to the classroom everything will change -- Change can be easy -- We're not in Kansas anymore -- Where's the proof -- Tools for exploring the brain -- Ten reasons to care about brain research -- The evolution of brain models -- Be a brain-smart consumer: recognizing good research -- Action or theory: who wants to read all (...)
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  25. Sumner B. Twiss (2005). Comparative Ethics, a Common Morality, and Human Rights. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):649-657.score: 800.0
    This essay is a brief attempt to summarize and evaluate the contributions that "Democracy and Tradition" makes to the field of comparative ethics. It is argued that the potential impact of these contributions would be strengthened by engagement with the common morality already imbedded in international human rights norms.
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  26. Manfred Berg & Bernd Schäfer (eds.) (2009). Historical Justice in International Perspective: How Societies Are Trying to Right the Wrongs of the Past. Cambridge University Press.score: 793.0
    This book makes a valuable contribution to recent debates on redress for historical injustices by offering case studies from nine countries on five continents.
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  27. Luis Cabrera (2004). Political Theory of Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Case for the World State. Routledge.score: 777.0
    Could global government be the answer to global poverty and starvation? Cosmopolitan thinkers challenge the widely held belief that we owe more to our co-citizens than to those in other countries. This book offers a moral argument for world government, claiming that not only do we have strong obligations to people elsewhere, but that accountable integration among nation-states will help ensure that all persons can lead a decent life. Cabrera considers both the views of those political philosophers who say (...)
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  28. Abraham Magendzo Kolstrein (2011). Why Are We Involved in Human Rights and Moral Education? Educators as Constructors of Our Own History. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):289-297.score: 772.8
    My professional interest originally focused on curriculum planning and development, but for the last 30 years I have been researching, publishing and teaching in the field of human rights education. Suddenly, I became a human rights educator. Suddenly? No, nothing in our personal and professional life is the result of an abrupt occurrence. We are subjects of a particular history, a succession of events and narratives, located in time, space and circumstances. I constructed myself, consciously or (...)
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  29. David W. Oaks (2011). 12 The Moral Imperative for Dialogue with Organizations of Survivors of Coerced Psychiatric Human Rights Violations. In Thomas W. Kallert, Juan E. Mezzich & John Monahan (eds.), Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry: Clinical, Legal and Ethical Aspects. Wiley-Blackwell. 187.score: 771.0
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  30. Pablo De Greiff (ed.) (2006). The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press.score: 768.0
    Offering the most comprehensive book-length study to-date of reparation programs, this handbook contains an innovative blend of case-study analysis, thematic papers, and national legislation documents from leading scholars and practitioners. This landmark work will make a genuine contribution to the theory and practice of reparations.
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  31. João Lopes Alves (2005). Ética & Contrato Social: Estudos. Edições Colibri.score: 768.0
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  32. Silvia Staub-Bernasconi (2011). Human Rights and Social Work: Philosophical and Ethical Reflections on a Possible Dialogue Between East Asia and the West. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):331-347.score: 764.8
    The ?West? is inclined to blame Asian countries, especially China, for its disrespect of human rights without looking at it's own record of human rights violations! This makes a fair dialogue very difficult till improbable. Social work on the international level can't avoid this dialogue if it wants to live up to its internationally consensual documents which all refer to human rights. The thesis of this article is, that it will only succeed, if it (...)
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  33. Ingrid Brena Sesma & Luis Díaz Müller (eds.) (2004). Segundas Jornadas Sobre Globalización y Derechos Humanos: Bioética y Biotecnología. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.score: 762.0
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  34. Heta Häyry (1998). Individual Liberty and Medical Control. Ashgate Pub..score: 762.0
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  35. Subhradipta Sarkar, Archana Sarma, K. Mathiharan & Henri Tiphagne (eds.) (2006). Resource Materials for Doctors and Psychiatrists. People's Watch--Tamil Nadu.score: 762.0
     
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  36. Hamide Tacir (2011). Hastanın Kendi Geleceğini Belirleme Hakkı. Xii Levha.score: 762.0
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  37. Lisa Bortolotti (2006). Moral Rights and Human Culture. Ethical Perspectives 13 (4):603-620.score: 756.0
    In this paper I argue that there is no moral justification for the conviction that rights should be reserved to humans. In particular, I reject James Griffin’s view on the moral relevance of the cultural dimension of humanity. Drawing from the original notion of individual right introduced in the Middle Ages and the development of this notion in the eighteenth century, I emphasise that the practice of according rights is justified by the interest in safeguarding the (...)
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  38. Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) (2003). Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research: Readings and Commentary. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 741.6
    All investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health are now required to receive training about the ethics of clinical research. Based on a course taught by the editors at NIH, Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research is the first book designed to help investigators meet this new requirement. The book begins with the history of human subjects research and guidelines instituted since World War II. It then covers various stages and components of the clinical trial (...)
     
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  39. Audrey Osler & Hugh Starkey (1994). Fundamental Issues in Teacher Education for Human Rights: A European Perspective. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):349-359.score: 726.0
    Abstract Human rights education is an essential part of preparation for participation in a pluralistic democracy. As Europe aspires to be a continent of democratic states accepting human rights as their basic principles, a human rights ethic should be a feature of all schools within Europe. Human rights education provides an ethical and moral framework for living in community. Moreover, this ethical position is backed in Europe by the powerful (...)
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  40. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.score: 718.4
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, (...)
     
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  41. Adolfo Jorge Sánchez Hidalgo (2014). The Human Rights After the Spanish Civil War. Archiv Fuer Rechts- Und Sozialphilosphie 100 (3):379-395.score: 711.0
    The aim of this study is to characterize the weak discussion about the Human Rights in Franco's time, not in general, but by testing Vallet de Goytisolo's works. This author is deeply influenced by the lectures of M. Villey, Parisinian philosopher well-known by his denial of Human Rights. A comparative study of these authors will be done focusing on two – faced aspects : the strength and fragility of their doctrines. Both authors are defined as (...)
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  42. Irene Oh (2008). Approaching Islam: Comparative Ethics Through Human Rights. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):405-423.score: 710.4
    A dialogical approach to understanding Islamic ethics rejects objectivist methods in favor of a conversational model in which participants accept each other as rational moral agents. Hans-Georg Gadamer asserts the importance of agreement upon a subject matter through conversation as a means to gaining insight into other persons and cultures, and Jürgen Habermas stresses the importance of fairness in dialogue. Using human rights as a subject matter for engaging in dialogue with Islamic scholars, Muslim perspectives on issues (...)
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  43. Michiel Korthals & Cristian Timmermann (2012). Reflections on the International Networking Conference “Ethical and Social Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights – Agrifood and Health” Brussels, September 2011. Synesis 3 (1):G66-73.score: 693.2
    Public goods, as well as commercial commodities, are affected by exclusive arrangements secured by intellectual property (IP) rights. These rights serve as an incentive to invest human and material capital in research and development. Particularly in the life sciences, IP rights regulate objects such as food and medicines that are key to securing human rights, especially the right to adequate food and the right to health. Consequently, IP serves private (economic) and public interests. Part (...)
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  44. Thomas M. Besch, Reflections on the Foundations of Human Rights.score: 686.4
    Is there an approach to human rights that justifies rights-allocating moral-political principles as principles that are equally acceptable by everyone to whom they apply, while grounding them in categorical, reasonably non-rejectable foundations? The paper examines Rainer Forst’s constructivist attempt to provide such an approach. I argue that his view, far from providing an alternative to “ethical” approaches, depends for its own reasonableness on a reasonably contestable conception of the good, namely, the good of constitutive discursive (...)
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  45. Mary Midgley (1994/1996). The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom, and Morality. Routledge.score: 681.6
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and (...)
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  46. Stefano Semplici (forthcoming). Balancing the Principles: Why the Universality of Human Rights is Not the Trojan Horse of Moral Imperialism. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-9.score: 680.0
    The new dilemmas and responsibilities which arise in bioethics both because of the unprecedented pace of scientific development and of growing moral pluralism are more and more difficult to grapple with. At the ‘global’ level, the call for the universal nature at least of some fundamental moral values and principles is often being contended as a testament of arrogance, if not directly as a new kind of subtler imperialism. The human rights framework itself, which provided the (...)
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  47. Jacqueline A. Laing (2006). A Certain Kind of Moral Scepticism and the Foundations of Human Rights. Law and Justice 157:39-53.score: 676.8
    Despite the prevalence of human rights talk in Western jurisprudence, there has never been less belief in or acceptance of, any genuine form of objective morality. Academics reject the reality of moral objectivity and proclaim, as an objective truth, that morality is a mere “socio-historical construct”, illusory because always outweighed by worse consequences, expressions of subjective preference or mere evidence of culturally relative predilections. If morality is not that, then it is thought to be evidence of the (...)
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  48. Lizabeth A. Barclay & Karen S. Markel (2009). Ethical Fairness and Human Rights: The Treatment of Employees with Psychiatric Disabilities. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):333 - 345.score: 676.0
    Extant business research has not addressed the ethical treatment of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. This article will describe previous research on individuals with psychiatric disabilities drawn from rehabilitation, psychological, managerial, legal, as well as related business ethics writings before presenting a framework that illustrates the dynamics of (un)ethical behavior in relation to the employment of such individuals. Individuals with psychiatric disabilities often evoke negative reactions from those in their environment. Lastly, we provide recommendations for how employees and organizations (...)
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  49. Kathryn Ehrich, Clare Williams & Bobbie Farsides (2010). Consenting Futures: Professional Views on Social, Clinical and Ethical Aspects of Information Feedback to Embryo Donors in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Clinical Ethics 5 (2):77-85.score: 676.0
    This paper reports from an ongoing multidisciplinary, ethnographic study that is exploring the views, values and practices (the ethical frameworks) drawn on by professional staff in assisted conception units and stem cell laboratories in relation to embryo donation for research purposes, particularly human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, in the UK. We focus here on the connection between possible incidental findings and the circumstances in which embryos are donated for hESC research, and report some of the uncertainties and (...)
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  50. Rosalind Hursthouse (2000). Ethics, Humans, and Other Animals: An Introduction with Readings. Routledge.score: 652.0
    Rosalind Hursthouse carefully introduces one of three standard approaches in current ethical theory: utilitarianism, rights, and virtue ethics. She then proceeds to clearly explain how each approach encourages us to think about our treatment of animals. Every chapter is linked to a reading from a key exponent of each approach. With readings from Singer, Regan and Midgley.
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