Search results for 'Human rights Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association (2009). Declaration on Anthropology and Human Rights (1999). In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 680.0
     
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  2. Adam Etinson (2010). To Be or Not to Be: Charles Beitz on the Philosophy of Human Rights. Res Publica 16 (4):441-448.score: 174.0
    This is a review article of Charles Beitz's 2009 book on the philosophy of human rights, The Idea of Human Rights. The article provides a charitable overview of the book's main arguments, but also raises some doubts about the depth of the distinction between Beitz's 'practical' approach to humans rights and its 'naturalistic' counterparts.
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  3. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 174.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
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  4. Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.score: 161.0
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  5. Patrick Hayden (2001). The Philosophy of Human Rights. Paragon House.score: 147.0
  6. Christoph Lüth, Dieter Jedan, Thomas Altfelix & Rita E. Guare (eds.) (2002). The Enlightenment Idea of Human Rights in Philosophy and Education and Postmodern Criticism. Winkler.score: 147.0
     
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  7. Alan S. Rosenbaum (ed.) (1980). The Philosophy of Human Rights: International Perspectives. Greenwood Press.score: 145.0
  8. W. J. Talbott (2010). Human Rights and Human Well-Being. Oxford University Press.score: 131.0
    The consequentialist project for human rights -- Exceptions to libertarian natural rights -- The main principle -- What is well-being? What is equity? -- The two deepest mysteries in moral philosophy -- Security rights -- Epistemological foundations for the priority of autonomy rights -- The millian epistemological argument for autonomy rights -- Property rights, contract rights, and other economic rights -- Democratic rights -- Equity rights -- The most (...)
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  9. John K. Roth (ed.) (2005). Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 131.0
    Genocide is evil or nothing could be. It raises a host of questions about humanity, rights, justice, and reality, which are key areas of concern for philosophy. Strangely, however, philosophers have tended to ignore genocide. Even more problematic, philosophy and philosophers bear more responsibility for genocide than they have usually admitted. In Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide, an international group of twenty-five contemporary philosophers work to correct those deficiencies by showing how philosophy (...)
     
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  10. James Griffin (2008). On Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 116.0
    It is our job now - the job of this book - to influence and develop the unsettled discourse of human rights so as to complete the incomplete idea.
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  11. Amar Dhall (2010). On the Philosophy and Legal Theory of Human Rights in Light of Quantum Holism. World Futures 66 (1):1 – 25.score: 116.0
    This article explores the traditional basis of modern human rights doctrines and exposes some of the systemic shortcomings. It then posits that a number of these problems are advanced via integrating some developments in the philosophy of science and substantive scientific research into legal philosophy. This article argues that supervening holism grounded in quantum mechanics provides an alternative basis to human rights by positing an ontological construct that is congruous with many of the wisdom (...)
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  12. John Mahoney (2007). The Challenge of Human Rights: Origin, Development, and Significance. Blackwell Pub..score: 116.0
    The Challenge of Human Rights traces the history of human rights theory from classical antiquity through the enlightenment to the modern human rights movement, and analyses the significance of human rights in today’s increasingly globalized world. Provides an engaging study of the origin and the philosophical and political development of human rights discourse. Offers an original defence of human rights. Explores the significance of human rights in (...)
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  13. Mayra Gómez (2003). Human Rights in Cuba, El Salvador, and Nicaragua: A Sociological Perspective on Human Rights Abuse. Routledge.score: 116.0
    This book presents a historical perspective on patterns of human rights abuse in Cuba, El Salvador and Nicaragua and incorporates international relations in to the traditional theories of state repression found within the social sciences.
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  14. Clinton Timothy Curle (2007). Humanité: John Humphrey's Alternative Account of Human Rights. University of Toronto Press.score: 116.0
    Curle concludes that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, understood in a Bergsonian context, provides us with a way to affirm in the modern context that ...
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  15. Vittorio Cotesta (2012). Global Society and Human Rights. Brill.score: 116.0
    Knowledge transmission and universality of man in global society -- The other and the paradoxes of universalism -- Religion, human rights, and political conflicts -- Europe : common values and a common identity -- The public sphere and political space -- America and Europe : Carl Schmitt and Alexis de Tocqueville -- Identity and human rights : a glance at Europe from afar -- Human rights, universalism, and cosmopolitanism.
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  16. Thaddeus Metz (2010). Human Dignity, Capital Punishment, and an African Moral Theory: Toward a New Philosophy of Human Rights. Journal of Human Rights 9 (1):81-99.score: 115.0
    In this article I spell out a conception of dignity grounded in African moral thinking that provides a plausible philosophical foundation for human rights, focusing on the particular human right not to be executed by the state. I first demonstrate that the South African Constitutional Court’s sub-Saharan explanations of why the death penalty is degrading all counterintuitively entail that using deadly force against aggressors is degrading as well. Then, I draw on one major strand of Afro-communitarian thought (...)
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  17. Costas Douzinas (2007). Human Rights and Empire: The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 115.0
    Erudite and timely, this book is a key contribution to the renewal of radical theory and politics.
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  18. A. Belden Fields (2003). Rethinking Human Rights for the New Millennium. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 114.0
    A. Belden Fields invites people to think more deeply about human rights in this book in an attempt to overcome many of the traditional arguments in the human rights literature. He argues that human rights should be reconceptualized in a holistic way to combine philosophical, historical, and empirical-practical dimensions. Human rights are viewed not as a set of universal abstractions but rather as a set of past and ongoing social practices rooted in (...)
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  19. Filip Spagnoli (2003). Homo Democraticus: On the Universal Desirability and the Not so Universal Possibility of Democracy and Human Rights. Cambridge Scholars.score: 114.0
    The subject of the book - the universal value of human rights and democracy - is highly topical in view of the "democratic imperialism" of the current US ...
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  20. Stephen C. Angle & Marina Svensson (eds.) (2001). Chinese Human Rights Reader. M. E. Sharpe.score: 114.0
    Translations of Chinese writing on human rights from throughout the twentieth century, with introductions.
     
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  21. S. Brincat (2009). 'Death to Tyrants": Self-Defence, Human Rights and Tyrannicide - Part II. Journal of International Political Theory 5 (1):75-93.score: 114.0
    This is the final part of a series of two papers that have examined the conceptual development of the philosophical justifications for tyrannicide. While Part I focused on the classical, medieval, and liberal justifications for tyrannicide, Part II aims to provide the tentative outlines of a contemporary model of tyrannicide in world politics. It is contended that a reinvigorated conception of self-defence, when coupled with the modern understanding of universal human rights, may provide the foundation for the normative (...)
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  22. Patrick Loobuyck (2010). Intrinsic and Equal Human Worth in a Secular Worldview. Fictionalism in Human Rights Discourse. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):58-77.score: 114.0
    One of the most central ideas of secular, humanistic morality is the thesis of intrinsic and equal human worth. Paradoxically, it is very hard to place this thesis in a secular worldview, because an indifferent universe can not make room for intrinsic values and a priori human rights. Nevertheless, it would not be a good solution to jettison the whole human rights discourse. Therefore, this paper proposes the stance of moral fictionalism: to believe that the (...)
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  23. Jos Philips (forthcoming). On Setting Priorities Among Human Rights. Human Rights Review.score: 114.0
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  24. Pablo Gilabert (2013). The Capability Approach and the Debate Between Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. A Critical Survey. Human Rights Review 14 (4):299-325.score: 113.0
    This paper provides a critical exploration of the capability approach to human rights (CAHR) with the specific aim of developing its potential for achieving a synthesis between “humanist” or “naturalistic” and “political” or “practical” perspectives in the philosophy of human rights. Section II presents a general strategy for achieving such a synthesis. Section III provides an articulation of the key insights of CAHR (its focus on actual realizations given diverse circumstances, its pluralism of grounds, its (...)
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  25. Mark F. N. Franke (2013). A Critique of the Universalisability of Critical Human Rights Theory: The Displacement of Immanuel Kant. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (4):367-385.score: 113.0
    While the critically oriented writings of Immanuel Kant remain the key theoretical grounds from which universalists challenge reduction of international rights law and protection to the practical particularities of sovereign states, Kant’s theory can be read as also a crucial argument for a human rights regime ordered around sovereign states and citizens. Consequently, universalists may be tempted to push Kant’s thinking to greater critical examination of ‘the human’ and its properties. However, such a move to more (...)
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  26. Joseph Hoover & Marta Iñiguez De Heredia (2011). Philosophers, Activists, and Radicals: A Story of Human Rights and Other Scandals. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (2):191-220.score: 113.0
    Paradoxically, the political success of human rights is often taken to be its philosophical failing. From US interventions to International NGOs to indigenous movements, human rights have found a place in diverse political spaces, while being applied to disparate goals and expressed in a range of practices. This heteronomy is vital to the global appeal of human rights, but for traditional moral and political philosophy it is something of a scandal. This paper is (...)
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  27. Robin Redhead & Nick Turnbull (2011). Towards a Study of Human Rights Practitioners. Human Rights Review 12 (2):173-189.score: 113.0
    The expansion of human rights provisions has produced an increasing number of human rights practitioners and delineated human rights as a field of its own. Questions of who is practicing human rights and how they practice it have become important. This paper considers the question of human rights practice and the agency of practitioners, arguing that practice should not be conceived as the application of philosophy, but instead approached from (...)
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  28. Andrew Fagan, Human Rights. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 103.0
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  29. Jennifer Szende (2011). Review of Charles Beitz The Idea of Human Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):639-641.score: 103.0
  30. Luigi Bonanate, Roberto Papini & William Sweet (eds.) (2011). Intercultural Dialogue and Human Rights. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.score: 102.0
  31. Benulal Dhar (2013). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Rights. D.K. Printworld.score: 102.0
     
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  32. Costas Douzinas (2000). The End of Human Rights: Critical Legal Thought at the Turn of the Century. Hart Pub..score: 102.0
     
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  33. Aakash Singh Rathore & Alex Cistelecan (eds.) (2011). Wronging Rights?: Philosophical Challenges for Human Rights. Routledge.score: 102.0
     
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  34. Markus Rothhaar (2010). Human Dignity and Human Rights in Bioethics: The Kantian Approach. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):251-257.score: 102.0
    The concept of human dignity plays an important role in the public discussion about ethical questions concerning modern medicine and biology. At the same time, there is a widespread skepticism about the possibility to determine the content and the claims of human dignity. The article goes back to Kantian Moral Philosophy, in order to show that human dignity has in fact a determinable content not as a norm in itself, but as the principle and ground of (...)
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  35. Richard Wilson (ed.) (1997). Human Rights, Culture and Context: Anthropological Perspectives. Pluto Press.score: 102.0
  36. Hailiang Yan (2008). Ren Quan Lun Zheng Fan Shi de Bian Ge: Cong Zhu Ti Xing Dao Guan Xi Xing = Theories of Justifications for Human Rights. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.score: 102.0
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  37. Sánchez Zamorano & María Purificación (2002). Nonfoundational Human Rights and Culture. Ediciones Uam.score: 102.0
     
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  38. Eric D. Smaw (2008). An Analysis of the Philosophy of Universal Human Rights: Hobbes, Locke, and Ignatieff. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):39-58.score: 101.0
    This project is, in part, motivated by my contention that one cannot adequately answer the question regarding the proper justification for human rights until one has answered the metaphysical question regarding the fundamental nature of human rights and the ontological question regarding the proper status of human rights. I offer a sustained analysis of metaphysical, ontological, and justificatory questions regarding human rights with the purpose of illustrating the point that theories that fail (...)
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  39. Enrico Berti, Philosophy and Human Rights.score: 101.0
    It is common knowledge that modern political societies, and to even greater extent contemporary ones, are characterized by pluralism. The term is used to describe situations which contain within the same society individuals and groups associated by various religions, various cultures, and various ethical systems. This is the consequence of several historical phenomena of widespread influence, which began in modern epoch and has intensified in the contemporary era, such as secularization, emigration, the establishment of democratic regimes in an even-larger number (...)
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  40. Marek Piechowiak (2008). Can Human Rights Be Real? Can Norms Be True? In Norm and Truth.score: 100.0
  41. Thomas Cushman (ed.) (2011). Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge.score: 100.0
  42. Vladimir Dedijer & Rudi Rizman (eds.) (1982). The Universal Validity of Human Rights: An Interdisciplinary Analysis: The Case of Russell Tribunals. R. Rizman.score: 100.0
  43. Jonathan Power (2003). Do We Need to Make War on Behalf of Human Rights? Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies.score: 100.0
     
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  44. Marcus Arvan (2014). A Better, Dual Theory of Human Rights. Philosophical Forum 45 (1):17-47.score: 99.0
    Human rights theory and practice have long been stuck in a rut. Although disagreement is the norm in philosophy and social-political practice, the sheer depth and breadth of disagreement about human rights is truly unusual. Human rights theorists and practitioners disagree – wildly in many cases – over just about every issue: what human rights are, what they are for, how many of them there are, how they are justified, what (...) interests or capacities they are supposed to protect, what they require of persons and institutions, etc. Disagreement about human rights is so profound, in fact, that several prominent theorists have remarked that the very concept of a “human right” appears nearly criterionless. In my 2012 article, “Reconceptualizing Human Rights”, I diagnosed the root cause of these problems. Theorists and practitioners have falsely supposed that the concept of “human right” picks out a single, unified class of moral entitlements. However, the concept actually refers to two fundamentally different types of moral entitlements: (A) international human rights, which are universal human moral entitlements to coercive international protections, and (B) domestic human rights, which are universal human moral entitlements to coercive domestic protections. Accordingly, I argue, an adequate “theory of human rights” must be a dual theory. The present paper provides the first such theory. First, I show that almost every justificatory ground given for “human rights” in the literature – such as the notion of a “minimally decent human life”, “urgent human interests”, and “human needs” – faces at least one of two fatal problems. Second, I show that after some revisions, James Griffin’s conception of “personhood” provides a compelling justificatory ground for international human rights. Third, I show that the account entails that there are very few international human rights – far fewer than existing human rights theories and practices suggest. Fourth, I show that there are reasons to find my very short list of international human rights compelling: “human rights justifications” for coercive international and foreign policy actions over the past several have consistently overstepped what can be morally justified, and my account reveals precisely how existing human rights theories and practices have failed to adequately grapple with these moral hazards. Finally, I outline an account of domestic human rights which fits well with many existing human rights beliefs and practices, vindicating those beliefs and practices, but only at a domestic level. (shrink)
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  45. Henning Hahn (2012). Justifying Feasibility Constraints on Human Rights. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):143-157.score: 99.0
    It is a crucial question whether practicalities should have an impact in developing an applicable theory of human rights—and if, how (far) such constraints can be justified. In the course of the non-ideal turn of today’s political philosophy, any entitlements (and social entitlements in particular) stand under the proviso of practical feasibility. It would, after all, be unreasonable to demand something which is, under the given political and economic circumstances, unachievable. Thus, many theorist—particularly those belonging to the (...)
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  46. Stephen C. Angle (2002). Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry. Cambridge University Press.score: 99.0
    This book is about the origins and development of Chinese ideas of human rights, and about what we in the contemporary world should make of different cultures having different moral ideas. It differs from competing books in two ways. First, its historical account is much fuller, since it shows how Chinese discussions of rights grew out of pre-existing Confucian philosophical concerns. Second, it is also a work of philosophy: it explains what it means to have moral (...)
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  47. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Reflections on Human Rights and Power. In Adam Etinson (ed.), Human Rights: Moral or Political? Oxford University Press.score: 98.0
    Human rights are particularly relevant in contexts in which there are significant asymmetries of power, but where these asymmetries exist the human rights project turns out to be especially difficult to realize. The stronger can use their disproportionate power both to threaten others’ human rights and to frustrate attempts to secure their fulfillment. They may even monopolize the international discussion as to what human rights are and how they should be implemented. This (...)
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  48. Tom Campbell (2006). Rights: A Critical Introduction. Routledge.score: 98.0
    We take rights to be fundamental to everyday life. Rights are also controversial and hotly debated both in theory and practice. Where do rights come from? Are they invented or discovered? What sort of rights are there and who is entitled to them? In this comprehensive introduction, Tom Campbell introduces and critically examines the key philosophical debates about rights. The first part of the book covers historical and contemporary theories of rights, including the origin (...)
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  49. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Power. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 98.0
    This paper explores the connections between human rights, human dignity, and power. The idea of human dignity is omnipresent in human rights discourse, but its meaning and point is not always clear. It is standardly used in two ways, to refer to (a) a normative status of persons that makes their treatment in terms of human rights a proper response, and (b) a social condition of persons in which their human (...) are fulfilled. This paper pursues three tasks. First, it provides an analysis of the content and an interpretation of the role of the idea of human dignity in current human rights discourse. The interpretation includes a pluralist view of human interests and dignity that avoids a narrow focus on rational agency. Second, this paper characterizes the two aspects of human dignity in terms of capabilities. Certain general human capabilities are among the facts that ground status-dignity, and the presence of certain more specific capabilities constitutes condition-dignity. Finally, this paper explores how the pursuit of human rights and human dignity links to distributions and uses of power. Since capabilities are a form of power, and human rights are in part aimed at respecting and promoting capabilities, human rights involve empowerment. Exploring the connections between human rights, capabilities, and empowerment provides resources to defend controversial human rights such as the right to democratic political participation, and to respond to worries about the feasibility of their fulfillment. This paper also argues that empowerment must be coupled with solidaristic concern in order to respond to unavoidable facts of social dependency and vulnerability. (shrink)
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  50. W. J. Talbott (2005). Which Rights Should Be Universal? Oxford University Press.score: 98.0
    "We hold these truths to be self-evident..." So begins the U.S. Declaration of Independence. What follows those words is a ringing endorsement of universal rights, but it is far from self-evident. Why did the authors claim that it was? William Talbott suggests that they were trapped by a presupposition of Enlightenment philosophy: That there was only one way to rationally justify universal truths, by proving them from self-evident premises. With the benefit of hindsight, it is clear that the (...)
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