Search results for 'Human-animal relationships' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. S. Franklin (2007). Human-Nonhuman Animal Relationships in Australia: An Overview of Results From the First National Survey and Follow-Up Case Studies 2000-2004. Society and Animals 15 (1):7-27.score: 594.0
    This paper provides an overview of results from an Australian Research Council-funded project "Sentiments and Risks: The Changing Nature of Human-Animal Relations in Australia." The data discussed come from a survey of 2000 representative Australians at the capital city, state, and rural regional level. It provides both a snapshot of the state of involvement of Australians with nonhuman animals and their views on critical issues: ethics, rights, animals as food, risk from animals, native versus introduced animals, hunting, fishing, and (...)
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  2. Erin McKenna & Andrew Light (eds.) (2004). Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships. Indiana University Press.score: 525.0
    What does American pragmatism contribute to contemporary debates about human-animal relationships? Does it acknowledge our connections to all living things? Does it bring us closer to an ethical treatment of all animals?
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  3. Chris Degeling, Ian Kerridge & Melanie Rock (2013). What to Think of Canine Obesity? Emerging Challenges to Our Understanding of Human–Animal Health Relationships. Social Epistemology 27 (1):90 - 104.score: 522.0
    (2013). What to Think of Canine Obesity? Emerging Challenges to Our Understanding of Human–Animal Health Relationships. Social Epistemology: Vol. 27, No. 1, pp. 90-104. doi: 10.1080/02691728.2012.760662.
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  4. Silke Schicktanz (2006). Ethical Considerations of the Human–Animal-Relationship Under Conditions of Asymmetry and Ambivalence. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):7-16.score: 494.0
    Ethical reflection deals not only with the moral standing and handling of animals, it should also include a critical analysis of the underlying relationship. Anthropological, psychological, and sociological aspects of the human–animal-relationship should be taken into account. Two conditions, asymmetry and ambivalence, are taken as the historical and empirical basis for reflections on the human–animal-relationship in late modern societies. These conditions explain the variety of moral practice, apart from paradoxes, and provide a framework to systematize animal ethical problems in a (...)
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  5. Clare Palmer (2001). “Taming the Wild Profusion of Existing Things”?: A Study of Foucault, Power, and Human/Animal Relationships. Environmental Ethics 23 (4):339-358.score: 492.0
    I explore how some aspects of Foucoult’s work on power can be applied to human/animal power relations. First, I argue that because animals behave as “beings that react” and can respond in different ways to human actions, in principle at least, Foucoult’s work can offer insights into human/animal power relations. However, many of these relations fall into the category of “domination,” in which animals are unable to respond. Second, I examine different kinds of human power practices, in particular, ways in (...)
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  6. Clifton P. Flynn (2009). Women-Battering, Pet Abuse, and Human-Animal Relationships. In Andrew Linzey (ed.), The Link Between Animal Abuse and Human Violence. Sussex Academic Press. 116--125.score: 486.0
     
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  7. Interdisciplinary Humanities Center & Santa Barbara March (2001). Animals in History And Culture. Faculty of Humanities, Bath Spa University College. July 3-4, 2000 Representing Animals. Center for Twentieth Century Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. April 13-15, 2000 Thresholds of Identity in Human-Animal Relationships: An Interdisciplinary Colloquium. [REVIEW] Society and Animals 9 (3).score: 456.0
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  8. Gail F. Melson (2002). Psychology and the Study of Human-Animal Relationships. Society and Animals 10 (4):347-352.score: 453.0
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  9. Margaret Schneider (2005). Exploring Human-Animal Relationships. The 14th Annual Conference of the International Society for Anthrozoology On July 11 and 12, 2005 the International Society for Anthrozoology (ISAZ) Held its 14th Annual Conference in Niagara Falls, New York. ISAZ is a Nonprofit, Nonpolitical. [REVIEW] Society and Animals 13 (4).score: 453.0
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  10. Margaret Schneider (2005). Exploring Human-Animal Relationships. The 14th Annual Conference of the International Society for Anthrozoology. Society and Animals 13 (4):355-357.score: 453.0
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  11. C. Rochais, S. Henry, C. Sankey, F. Nassur, A. Góracka-Bruzda & M. Hausberger (2014). Visual Attention, an Indicator of Human-Animal Relationships? A Study of Domestic Horses (Equus Caballus). Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 450.0
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  12. Mark Juergensmeyer (1985). Gandhi and the Cow: The Ethics of Human/Animal Relationships. Between the Species 1 (1):215.score: 450.0
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  13. M. Bekoff (ed.) (2007). Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships. Greenwood Press.score: 450.0
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  14. R. Claire Budge, John Spicer, Boyd Jones & Ross St George (1998). Health Correlates of Compatibility and Attachment in Human-Companion Animal Relationships. Society and Animals 6 (3):219-234.score: 438.0
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  15. Ross St George, R. Claire Budge, John Spicer & Boyd Jones (1998). Health Correlates of Compatibility and Attachment in Human-Companion Animal Relationships. Society and Animals 6 (3):219-234.score: 438.0
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  16. R. Claire Budge, John Spicer, Boyd Jones & Ross St George (1998). Health Correlates of Compatibility and Attachment in Human-Companion Animal Relationships. Society and Animals 6 (3):219-234.score: 438.0
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  17. Ann K. Clark (2006). Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (1):56-59.score: 435.0
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  18. Mark Bernstein (2006). Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):107-110.score: 435.0
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  19. Michael Allen Fox (2005). Erin McKenna and Andrew Light, Eds., Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (6):408-412.score: 435.0
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  20. M. A. Fox (2005). Erin McKenna and Andrew Light, Eds., Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships. Philosophy in Review 25 (6):408.score: 435.0
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  21. Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.score: 396.0
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's our fault -- The (...)
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  22. Kristin Armstrong Oma (2013). Human-Animal Meeting Points: Use of Space in the Household Arena in Past Societies. Society and Animals 21 (2):162-177.score: 393.0
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  23. Natalie Lloyd & Jane Mulcock (2007). Human-Animal Studies in Australia: Current Directions. Society and Animals 15 (1):1-5.score: 387.0
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  24. Jane Mulcock & Natalie Lloyd (2007). Human-Animal Studies in Australia: Current Directions. Society and Animals 15 (1):1-5.score: 387.0
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  25. Wesley J. Smith (2009). A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy: The Human Cost of the Animal Rights Movement. Encounter Books.score: 378.0
    Smith believe that granting "rights" to animals would inevitably diminish human dignity.
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  26. Wendy E. Phillips (2012). Double Personality: The Relationship Between Human and Animal Tono in Chautengo, Guerrero, Mexico in 2005. Anthropology of Consciousness 23 (2):158-174.score: 351.0
    After reading the research of Mexican anthropologists concerning the possible retention of traditional indigenous African beliefs in contemporary Mexican communities of African descent, I interviewed women of the region who migrated to Atlanta, Georgia about their spiritual beliefs and practices. I was surprised by the similarities in their reports to those recorded by Gonzalo Aguirre Beltran, who worked in Mexico over 60 years ago. I traveled to the town of Chautengo in coastal Guerrero state in 2005 to talk with women (...)
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  27. T. Milstein (2007). Animal Discourse: How Human Communication Informs and Shapes the Human Relationship with Other Animals. In M. Bekoff (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships. Greenwood Press.score: 345.0
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  28. Hope Ferdowsian (2011). Human and Animal Research Guidelines: Aligning Ethical Constructs with New Scientific Developments. Bioethics 25 (8):472-478.score: 333.0
    Both human research and animal research operate within established standards and procedures. Although the human research environment has been criticized for its sometimes inefficient and imperfect process, reported abuses of human subjects in research served as the impetus for the establishment of the Nuremberg Code, Declaration of Helsinki, and the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research and the resulting Belmont Report. No similar, comprehensive and principled effort has addressed the use of animals in (...)
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  29. Francine L. Dolins (ed.) (1999). Attitudes to Animals: Views in Animal Welfare. Cambridge University Press.score: 315.0
    This thought-provoking book will ask what it is to be human, what to be animal, and what are the natures of the relationships between them. This is accomplished with philosophical and ethical discussions, scientific evidence and dynamic theoretical approaches. Attitudes to Animals will also encourage us to think not only of our relationships to non-human animals, but also of those to other, human, animals. This book provides a foundation that the reader can use to make ethical choices about (...)
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  30. Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka (2011). Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 312.0
    Zoopolis offers a new agenda for the theory and practice of animal rights. Most animal rights theory focuses on the intrinsic capacities or interests of animals, and the moral status and moral rights that these intrinsic characteristics give rise to. Zoopolis shifts the debate from the realm of moral theory and applied ethics to the realm of political theory, focusing on the relational obligations that arise from the varied ways that animals relate to human societies and institutions. Building on recent (...)
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  31. Andrea Beetz, Kerstin Uvnäs-Moberg, Henri Julius & Kurt Kotrschal (2012). Psychosocial and Psychophysiological Effects of Human-Animal Interactions: The Possible Role of Oxytocin. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 293.3
    During the last decade it has become more widely accepted that pet-ownership and animal-assistance in therapy and education may have a multitude of positive effects on humans. Here, we review the evidence from 67 original studies on human-animal interactions (HAI) which met our inclusion criteria with regard to sample size, peer-review and standard scientific research design. Among the well-documented effects of HAI in humans of different ages, with and without special medical or mental health conditions are benefits for: social (...)
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  32. Dominique Lestel (2002). Human/Animal Communications, Language, and Evolution. Sign Systems Studies 30 (1):201-211.score: 291.0
    The article compares the research programs of teaching symbolic language to chimpanzees, pointing on the dichotomy between artificial language vs. ASL, and the dichotomy between researchers who decided to establish emotional relationships between themselves and the apes, and those who have seen apes as instrumental devices. It is concluded that the experiments with the most interesting results have been both with artificial language and ASL, but with strong affiliation between researchers and animal involved in the experiments. The experiments on (...)
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  33. Rob Boddice (ed.) (2011). Anthropocentrism: Human, Animals, Environments. Brill.score: 289.0
    This collection explores assumptions behind the label ‘anthropocentrism’, critically enquiring into the meaning of ‘human’.
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  34. Jocelyne Porcher (2011). The Relationship Between Workers and Animals in the Pork Industry: A Shared Suffering. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (1):3-17.score: 276.0
    Animal production, especially pork production, is facing growing international criticism. The greatest concerns relate to the environment, the animals’ living conditions, and the occupational diseases. But human and animal conditions are rarely considered together. Yet the living conditions at work and the emotional bond that inevitably forms bring the farm workers and the animals to live very close, which leads to shared suffering. Suffering does spread from animals to human beings and can cause workers physical, mental, and also moral suffering, (...)
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  35. Aysha Akhtar (2012). Animals and Public Health: Why Treating Animals Better is Critical to Human Welfare. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 270.0
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  36. George Nicholson (1801/1999). George Nicholson's on the Primeval Diet of Man (1801): Vegetarianism and Human Conduct Toward Animals. E. Mellen Press.score: 270.0
     
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  37. Michael J. Ryan, Nicole M. Kime & Gil G. Rosenthal (1998). Patterns of Evolution in Human Speech Processing and Animal Communication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):282-283.score: 261.0
    We consider Sussman et al.'s suggestion that auditory biases for processing low-noise relationships among pairs of acoustic variables is a preadaptation for human speech processing. Data from other animal communication systems, especially those involving sexual selection, also suggest that neural biases in the receiver system can generate strong selection on the form of communication signals.
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  38. Dale Jamieson (2002). Morality's Progress: Essays on Humans, Other Animals, and the Rest of Nature. Oxford University Press.score: 258.0
    The twenty-two papers here are invigoratingly diverse, but together tell a unified story about various aspects of the morality of our relationships to animals and to nature.
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  39. Lori Brown (2007). Becoming-Animal in the Flesh: Expanding the Ethical Reach of Deleuze and Guattari's Tenth Plateau. Phaenex 2 (2):260-278.score: 255.0
    Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s notion of becoming-animal offers a mode of interaction that goes beyond the symbolic language and conceptual thought that are often used in the western philosophical tradition to circumscribe the limits and define the nature of an ethical engagement. They fail, however, to provide a robust account of how becoming may yield an ethical exchange between the human being and the animal other. In order for this process to generate such an outcome, it must be accompanied (...)
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  40. Tjaart W. Schillhorn van Veen (1998). One Medicine: The Dynamic Relationship Between Animal and Human Medicine in History and at Present. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):115-120.score: 254.7
    The relation and collaboration of human and animal medicine had its ups and downs throughout history. The interaction between these two disciplines has been especially fruitful in the broad areas of patho-physiology and of epidemiology. An exploration of the interaction between the two disciplines, using historical and contemporary examples in comparative medicine, zoonoses, zooprophylaxis, and human-animal bond, reveals that a better understanding of animal and human disease, as well as societal changes such as interest in non-conventional medicine, are leading (...)
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  41. Elizabeth Atwood Lawrence (1998). Human and Horse Medicine Among Some Native American Groups. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):133-138.score: 252.0
    Because Plains Indians, as well as some other groups of Native Americans, generally perceived people and animals as closely related, medical therapies and preventive regimes in human and veterinary medical practice often overlapped. The sense of partnership that mounted people shared with their horses dictated that it was appropriate for certain equine remedies to be similar to those used for themselves. Horses, as well as people, could possess useful knowledge in the realm of curing. Reciprocity between humankind and nature was (...)
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  42. J. W. Guzek (1999). Human-Animal Relationship: Human Health and Animal Experimentation. Dialogue and Universalism 9:83-96.score: 243.3
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  43. Rosalind Hursthouse (2000). Ethics, Humans, and Other Animals: An Introduction with Readings. Routledge.score: 243.0
    Rosalind Hursthouse carefully introduces one of three standard approaches in current ethical theory: utilitarianism, rights, and virtue ethics. She then proceeds to clearly explain how each approach encourages us to think about our treatment of animals. Every chapter is linked to a reading from a key exponent of each approach. With readings from Singer, Regan and Midgley.
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  44. Corey Lee Wrenn (2014). Abolition Then and Now: Tactical Comparisons Between the Human Rights Movement and the Modern Nonhuman Animal Rights Movement in the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):177-200.score: 239.0
    This article discusses critical comparisons between the human and nonhuman abolitionist movements in the United States. The modern nonhuman abolitionist movement is, in some ways, an extension of the anti-slavery movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the ongoing human Civil Rights movement. As such, there is considerable overlap between the two movements, specifically in the need to simultaneously address property status and oppressive ideology. Despite intentional appropriation of terminology and numerous similarities in mobilization efforts, there has been disappointingly (...)
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  45. C. R. W. Spedding (2000). Animal Welfare. Earthscan Publications.score: 234.0
    This book charts new ground, specifically, in its negotiation of a definition of animal welfare, in its systematic discussion of the organizations actually ...
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  46. Ingrid Newkirk (2005). Making Kind Choices: Everyday Ways to Enhance Your Life Through Earth-and Animal-Friendly Living. St. Martin's Griffin.score: 234.0
    Choosing a compassionate lifestyle that makes you feel good and positively impacts on the environment and on animals has never been easier. In this practical and accessible handbook, loaded with resources for all products that are mentioned, Ingrid Newkirk presents fabulous options that will not only enhance your life, but those of your neighbors, your community, animals, and the earth itself. From comfortable home furnishings, to delicious foods, to fashionable clothing there are a myriad of choices to be made that (...)
     
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  47. Ingrid Newkirk (2009). The Peta Practical Guide to Animal Rights: Simple Acts of Kindness to Help Animals in Trouble. St. Martin's Griffin.score: 234.0
    With more than two million members and supporters, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is the world’s largest animal-rights organization, and its founder and president, Ingrid Newkirk, is one of the most well-known and most effective activists in America. She has spearheaded worldwide efforts to improve the treatment of animals in manufacturing, entertainment, and elsewhere. Every day, in laboratories, food factories, and other industries, animals by the millions are subjected to inhumane cruelty. In this accessible guide, Newkirk teaches (...)
     
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  48. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 234.0
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue in a (...)
     
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  49. Gala Argent (2013). Inked: Human-Horse Apprenticeship, Tattoos, and Time in the Pazyryk World. Society and Animals 21 (2):178-193.score: 228.0
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  50. Tora Holmberg (2008). A Feeling for the Animal: On Becoming an Experimentalist. Society and Animals 16 (4):316-335.score: 228.0
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