Search results for 'Human-animal relationships Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Silke Schicktanz (2006). Ethical Considerations of the Human–Animal-Relationship Under Conditions of Asymmetry and Ambivalence. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):7-16.score: 2018.0
    Ethical reflection deals not only with the moral standing and handling of animals, it should also include a critical analysis of the underlying relationship. Anthropological, psychological, and sociological aspects of the human–animal-relationship should be taken into account. Two conditions, asymmetry and ambivalence, are taken as the historical and empirical basis for reflections on the human–animal-relationship in late modern societies. These conditions explain the variety of moral practice, apart from paradoxes, and provide a framework to systematize animal (...)
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  2. Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka (2011). Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 1758.0
    Zoopolis offers a new agenda for the theory and practice of animal rights. Most animal rights theory focuses on the intrinsic capacities or interests of animals, and the moral status and moral rights that these intrinsic characteristics give rise to. Zoopolis shifts the debate from the realm of moral theory and applied ethics to the realm of political theory, focusing on the relational obligations that arise from the varied ways that animals relate to human societies and institutions. (...)
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  3. Dale Jamieson (2002). Morality's Progress: Essays on Humans, Other Animals, and the Rest of Nature. Oxford University Press.score: 1734.0
    The twenty-two papers here are invigoratingly diverse, but together tell a unified story about various aspects of the morality of our relationships to animals and to nature.
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  4. Francine L. Dolins (ed.) (1999). Attitudes to Animals: Views in Animal Welfare. Cambridge University Press.score: 1707.0
    This thought-provoking book will ask what it is to be human, what to be animal, and what are the natures of the relationships between them. This is accomplished with philosophical and ethical discussions, scientific evidence and dynamic theoretical approaches. Attitudes to Animals will also encourage us to think not only of our relationships to non-human animals, but also of those to other, human, animals. This book provides a foundation that the reader can use to make ethical (...)
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  5. Rosalind Hursthouse (2000). Ethics, Humans, and Other Animals: An Introduction with Readings. Routledge.score: 1626.0
    Rosalind Hursthouse carefully introduces one of three standard approaches in current ethical theory: utilitarianism, rights, and virtue ethics. She then proceeds to clearly explain how each approach encourages us to think about our treatment of animals. Every chapter is linked to a reading from a key exponent of each approach. With readings from Singer, Regan and Midgley.
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  6. Richard Twine (2010). Animals as Biotechnology: Ethics, Sustainability, and Critical Animal Studies. Earthscan.score: 1504.0
    This book concludes by considering whether growing counter calls to reduce our consumption of meat/dairy products in the face of climate change threats are in ...
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  7. C. R. W. Spedding (2000). Animal Welfare. Earthscan Publications.score: 1422.0
    This book charts new ground, specifically, in its negotiation of a definition of animal welfare, in its systematic discussion of the organizations actually ...
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  8. Alan Herscovici (1985/1991). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.score: 1410.0
  9. Mylan Engel (2010). The Philosophy of Animal Rights: A Brief Introduction for Students and Teachers. Lantern Books.score: 1408.0
    The book also contains an extensive bibliography of references and philosophical resources.
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  10. Lewis Gompertz (1824/1997). Moral Inquiries on the Situation of Man and of Brutes. E. Mellen Press.score: 1404.0
     
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  11. Lisa Johnson (2012). Power, Knowledge, Animals. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 1350.0
    The Essential Political Problem -- Contemporary Discourses about Animals -- Insurrection -- On Blindness to Being -- Parallelisms (Or, the Changeable Nature of Knowledge).
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  12. Rod Preece (ed.) (2002). Awe for the Tiger, Love for the Lamb: A Chronicle of Sensibility to Animals. Ubc Press.score: 1344.0
    From the myths of the ancient world to the Middle Ages to Darwin and beyond, Preece captures the most telling and fascinating accounts of humankind's ...
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  13. Jessica Pierce (2012). The Last Walk: Reflections on Our Pets at the End of Their Lives. The University of Chicago Press.score: 1332.0
    Drawing on the moving story of the last year of the life of her own treasured dog, Ody, she presents an in-depth exploration of the practical, medical, and moral issues that trouble pet owners confronted with the decline and death of their ...
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  14. Jocelyne Porcher (2011). Vivre Avec les Animaux: Une Utopie Pour le Xxie Siècle. Éditions la Découverte/M.A.U.S.S..score: 1320.0
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  15. Matthew H. Haber & Bryan Benham (2012). Reframing the Ethical Issues in Part-Human Animal Research: The Unbearable Ontology of Inexorable Moral Confusion. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):17-25.score: 1116.0
    Research that involves the creation of animals with human-derived parts opens the door to potentially valuable scientific and therapeutic advances, yet invokes unsettling moral questions. Critics and champions alike stand to gain from clear identification and careful consideration of the strongest ethical objections to this research. A prevailing objection argues that crossing the human/nonhuman species boundary introduces inexorable moral confusion (IMC) that warrants a restriction to this research on precautionary grounds. Though this objection may capture the intuitions (...)
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  16. Stephen Thomas Newmyer (2006). Animals, Rights, and Reason in Plutarch and Modern Ethics. Routledge.score: 835.0
    Plutarch is virtually unique in surviving classical authors in arguing that animals are rational and sentient, and in concluding that human beings must take notice of their interests. Stephen Newmyer explores Plutarch's three animal-related treatises, as well as passages from his other ethical treatises, which argue that non-human animals are rational and therefore deserve to fall within the sphere of human moral concern. Newmyer shows that some of the arguments Plutarch raises strikingly foreshadow those found in the works (...)
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  17. Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.) (2008). Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 830.7
    The entwined history of humans and elephants is fascinating but often sad. People have used elephants as beasts of burden and war machines, slaughtered them for their ivory, exterminated them as threats to people and ecosystems, turned them into objects of entertainment at circuses, employed them as both curiosities and conservation ambassadors in zoos, and deified and honored them in religious rites. How have such actions affected these pachyderms? What ethical and moral imperatives should humans follow to ensure (...)
     
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  18. Hope Ferdowsian (2011). Human and Animal Research Guidelines: Aligning Ethical Constructs with New Scientific Developments. Bioethics 25 (8):472-478.score: 828.0
    Both human research and animal research operate within established standards and procedures. Although the human research environment has been criticized for its sometimes inefficient and imperfect process, reported abuses of human subjects in research served as the impetus for the establishment of the Nuremberg Code, Declaration of Helsinki, and the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research and the resulting Belmont Report. No similar, comprehensive and principled effort has addressed the use of animals in (...)
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  19. Rebecca L. Walker (2006). Human and Animal Subjects of Research: The Moral Significance of Respect Versus Welfare. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):305-331.score: 804.0
    Human beings with diminished decision-making capacities are usually thought to require greater protections from the potential harms of research than fully autonomous persons. Animal subjects of research receive lesser protections than any human beings regardless of decision-making capacity. Paradoxically, however, it is precisely animals’ lack of some characteristic human capacities that is commonly invoked to justify using them for human purposes. In other words, for humans lesser capacities correspond to greater protections but for animals the opposite is true. Without explicit (...)
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  20. Margherita D'Amico (2007). La Pelle Dell'orso: Noi E Gli Altri Animali. Mondadori.score: 760.0
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  21. Erin McKenna & Andrew Light (eds.) (2004). Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships. Indiana University Press.score: 758.0
    What does American pragmatism contribute to contemporary debates about human-animal relationships? Does it acknowledge our connections to all living things? Does it bring us closer to an ethical treatment of all animals?
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  22. Clare Palmer (2001). “Taming the Wild Profusion of Existing Things”?: A Study of Foucault, Power, and Human/Animal Relationships. Environmental Ethics 23 (4):339-358.score: 743.8
    I explore how some aspects of Foucoult’s work on power can be applied to human/animal power relations. First, I argue that because animals behave as “beings that react” and can respond in different ways to human actions, in principle at least, Foucoult’s work can offer insights into human/animal power relations. However, many of these relations fall into the category of “domination,” in which animals are unable to respond. Second, I examine different kinds of human power practices, in particular, ways (...)
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  23. Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) (2003). Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research: Readings and Commentary. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 740.0
    All investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health are now required to receive training about the ethics of clinical research. Based on a course taught by the editors at NIH, Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research is the first book designed to help investigators meet this new requirement. The book begins with the history of human subjects research and guidelines instituted since World War II. It then covers various stages and components of the clinical trial process: (...)
     
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  24. Jason T. Eberl & Rebecca A. Ballard (2009). Metaphysical and Ethical Perspectives on Creating Animal-Human Chimeras. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (5):470-486.score: 732.0
    This paper addresses several questions related to the nature, production, and use of animal-human chimeras. At the heart of the issue is whether certain types of animal-human chimeras should be brought into existence, and, if they are, how we should treat such creatures. In our current research environment we recognize a dichotomy between research involving nonhuman animal subjects and research involving human subjects, and the classification of a research protocol into one of these categories will trigger different ethical standards (...)
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  25. J. T. Eberl & R. A. Ballard (2009). Metaphysical and Ethical Perspectives on Creating Animal-Human Chimeras. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (5):470-486.score: 732.0
    This paper addresses several questions related to the nature, production, and use of animal-human (a-h) chimeras. At the heart of the issue is whether certain types of a-h chimeras should be brought into existence, and, if they are, how we should treat such creatures. In our current research environment, we recognize a dichotomy between research involving nonhuman animal subjects and research involving human subjects, and the classification of a research protocol into one of these categories will trigger different ethical (...)
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  26. Lori Gruen (2011). Ethics and Animals: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 730.0
    In this fresh and comprehensive introduction to animal ethics, Lori Gruen weaves together poignant and provocative case studies with discussions of ethical theory, urging readers to engage critically and empathetically reflect on our treatment of other animals. In clear and accessible language, Gruen provides a survey of the issues central to human-animal relations and a reasoned new perspective on current key debates in the field. She analyses and explains a range of theoretical positions and poses challenging questions that (...)
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  27. Elisa Aaltola (2012). Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 700.0
    Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture explores the multifaceted moral meanings allocated to non-human suffering in contemporary Western culture.
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  28. Mary Midgley (1994/1996). The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom, and Morality. Routledge.score: 688.0
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come (...)
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  29. A. S. Franklin (2007). Human-Nonhuman Animal Relationships in Australia: An Overview of Results From the First National Survey and Follow-Up Case Studies 2000-2004. Society and Animals 15 (1):7-27.score: 660.7
    This paper provides an overview of results from an Australian Research Council-funded project "Sentiments and Risks: The Changing Nature of Human-Animal Relations in Australia." The data discussed come from a survey of 2000 representative Australians at the capital city, state, and rural regional level. It provides both a snapshot of the state of involvement of Australians with nonhuman animals and their views on critical issues: ethics, rights, animals as food, risk from animals, native versus introduced animals, hunting, fishing, and (...)
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  30. Claire Molloy (2011). Popular Media and Animals. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 655.0
    'Animals sell papers' : the value of animal stories -- Media and animal debates : welfare, rights, 'animal lovers' and terrorists -- Stars : animal performers -- Wild : authenticity and getting closer to nature -- Experimental : the visibility of experimental animals -- Farmed : selling animal products -- Hunted : recreational killing -- Monsters : horrors and moral panics -- Beginning at the end : re-imagining human-animal relations.
     
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  31. Logi Gunnarsson (2008). The Great Apes and the Severely Disabled: Moral Status and Thick Evaluative Concepts. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (3):305 - 326.score: 653.3
    The literature of bioethics suffers from two serious problems. (1) Most authors are unable to take seriously both the rights of the great apes and of severely disabled human infants. Rationalism—moral status rests on rational capacities—wrongly assigns a higher moral status to the great apes than to all severely disabled human infants with less rational capacities than the great apes. Anthropocentrism—moral status depends on membership in the human species—falsely grants all humans a higher moral status than (...)
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  32. Mark H. Bernstein (1998). On Moral Considerability: An Essay on Who Morally Matters. Oxford University Press.score: 651.7
    In this fresh and powerfully argued book, Mark Bernstein identifies the qualities that make an entity deserving of moral consideration. It is frequently assumed that only (normal) human beings count. Bernstein argues instead for "experientialism"--the view that having conscious experiences is necessary and sufficient for moral standing. He demonstrates that this position requires us to include many non-human animals in our moral realm, but not to the extent that many deep ecologists champion.
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  33. Nigel F. Piercy & Nikala Lane (2007). Ethical and Moral Dilemmas Associated with Strategic Relationships Between Business-to-Business Buyers and Sellers. Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):87 - 102.score: 651.0
    While ethical and moral issues have been widely considered in the general areas of marketing and sales, similar attention has not been given to the impact of strategic account management (SAM) approaches to handling the relationships between suppliers and very␣large customers. SAM approaches have been widely␣adopted by suppliers as a mechanism for managing␣relationships and partnerships with dominant customers␣– characterized by high levels of buyer–seller inter-dependence and forms of collaborative partnership. Observation suggests that the perceived moral (...)
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  34. Bernard E. Rollin (2006). Science and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 650.0
    Bernard Rollin historically and conceptually examines the ideology that denies the relevance of ethics to science. Providing an introduction to basic ethical concepts, he discusses a variety of ethical issues relevant to science and how they are ignored, to the detriment of both science and society. These issues include research on human subjects, animal research, genetic engineering, biotechnology, cloning, xenotransplantation, and stem cell research. Rollin also explores the ideological agnosticism that scientists have displayed regarding subjective experience in humans (...)
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  35. Maurice Hamington (2008). Learning Ethics From Our Relationships with Animals. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):177-188.score: 650.0
    The majority of animal advocacy discourse is unidirectional: Humans are regarded as stewards of animal welfare, and humans control the bestowal of rights and protections upon animals. This article offers a reversal of the typical moral reflection used in animal advocacy. I suggest that our relationship with animals participates in the development of moral faculties requisite for ethical behavior. In other words, we have a lot to learn from animals, not in this instance by documenting their behavior, (...)
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  36. Vasil Gluchman (2013). Pious Aspects in the Ethical and Moral Views of Matthias Bel. History of European Ideas 39 (6):776-790.score: 648.0
    Summary The author of the paper studies the ethical views of Matthias Bel expressed in his Preface to Johann Arndt's treatise and in Davidian-Solomonian Ethics, which contain a critique of false Christianity and ancient (especially Aristotle's) ethics. Bel refuses any philosophical ethics based on human nature, since man, in his very essence, is sinful and vicious. This leads to the general moral downfall of the young and mankind. He only recognises ethics whose source and the highest good is (...)
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  37. Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 636.0
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous research participant may have significant bearing (...)
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  38. Christine Chwaszcza (2007). Moral Responsibility and Global Justice: A Human Rights Approach. Nomos.score: 632.0
  39. Lori Brown (2007). Becoming-Animal in the Flesh: Expanding the Ethical Reach of Deleuze and Guattari's Tenth Plateau. Phaenex 2 (2):260-278.score: 628.0
    Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s notion of becoming-animal offers a mode of interaction that goes beyond the symbolic language and conceptual thought that are often used in the western philosophical tradition to circumscribe the limits and define the nature of an ethical engagement. They fail, however, to provide a robust account of how becoming may yield an ethical exchange between the human being and the animal other. In order for this process to generate such an outcome, it must (...)
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  40. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.score: 620.0
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, biotechnology (...)
     
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  41. Mark Juergensmeyer (1985). Gandhi and the Cow: The Ethics of Human/Animal Relationships. Between the Species 1 (1):215.score: 615.0
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  42. Andreas Maier (forthcoming). Torture. How Denying Moral Standing Violates Human Dignity. In Webster Elaine & Kaufmann Paulus (eds.), Violations of Human Dignity. Springer.score: 612.0
    In this article I try to elucidate the concept of human dignity by taking a closer look at the features of a paradigmatic torture situation. After identifying the salient aspects of torture, I discuss various accounts for the moral wrongness of such acts and argue that what makes torture a violation of human dignity is the perverted moral relationship between torturer and victim. This idea is subsequently being substantiated and defended against important objections. In the final part (...)
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  43. Mark H. Bernstein (2004). Without a Tear: Our Tragic Relationship with Animals. University of Illinois Press.score: 609.3
    The principle of gratuitous suffering -- The value of humans and the value of animals -- The holocaust of factory farming -- Hunting -- Animal experimentation -- The law and animals -- Women and animals.
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  44. Michael P. T. Leahy (1994). Against Liberation: Putting Animals in Perspective. Routledge.score: 605.0
    This timely and provocative book examines the theories behind the most commonly held contemporary assumptions about animal rights. Focusing on the writings of prominent pro-liberation activists such as Peter Singer, Tom Regan and Mary Midgley, Michael P. T. Leahy argues that the animal rights movement is based upon a series of fundamental misconceptions about the basic nature of animals--beliefs which define them rationally, emotionally, and morally in too human terms. Leahy gives particular emphasis to the writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein and (...)
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  45. Laura Yenisa Cabrera Trujillo & Sabrina Engel-Glatter (forthcoming). Human–Animal Chimera: A Neuro Driven Discussion? Comparison of Three Leading European Research Countries. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-23.score: 604.0
    Research with human–animal chimera raises a number of ethical concerns, especially when neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of non-human primates (NHPs). Besides animal welfare concerns and ethical issues associated with the use of embryonic stem cells, the research is also regarded as controversial from the standpoint of NHPs developing cognitive or behavioural capabilities that are regarded as “unique” to humans. However, scientists are urging to test new therapeutic approaches for neurological diseases in primate models as (...)
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  46. Raymond Anthony (2012). Building a Sustainable Future for Animal Agriculture: An Environmental Virtue Ethic of Care Approach Within the Philosophy of Technology. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):123-144.score: 590.0
    Agricultural technologies are non-neutral and ethical challenges are posed by these technologies themselves. The technologies we use or endorse are embedded with values and norms and reflect the shape of our moral character. They can literally make us better or worse consumers and/or people. Looking back, when the world’s developed nations welcomed and steadily embraced industrialization as the dominant paradigm for agriculture a half century or so ago, they inadvertently championed a philosophy of technology that promotes an insular (...)
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  47. David Degrazia (2007). Human-Animal Chimeras: Human Dignity, Moral Status, and Species Prejudice. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):309–329.score: 588.0
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  48. Adil E. Shamoo (2009). Responsible Conduct of Research. Oxford University Press.score: 585.3
    Scientific research and ethics -- Ethical theory and decision making -- Data acquisition and management -- Mentoring and professional relationship -- Collaboration in research -- Authorship -- Publication and peer review -- Misconduct in research -- Intellectual property -- Conflicts of interest and scientific objectivity -- The use of animals in research -- The use of human subjects in research -- The use of vulnerable subjects in research -- Genetics, cloning, and stem cell research -- International research.
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  49. David DeGrazia (1996). Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status. Cambridge University Press.score: 580.0
    This book distinguishes itself from much of the polemical literature on these issues by offering the most judicious and well-balanced account yet available of animals' moral standing, and related questions concerning their minds and welfare. Transcending jejune debates focused on utilitarianism versus rights, the book offers a fresh methodological approach with specific and constructive conclusions about our treatment of animals. David DeGrazia provides the most thorough discussion yet of whether equal consideration should be extended to animals' interests, and examines (...)
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  50. Rosemary Rodd (1990). Biology, Ethics, and Animals. Oxford University Press.score: 580.0
    This book utilizes both philosophical and biological approaches to address the various attitudes in the debate over animal rights. Rodd justifies ethical concern within a framework that is firmly grounded on evolutionary theory, and provides detailed discussion of practical situations in which ethical decisions have to be made. For moral philosophers, the book offers a biological background to the ethical questions involved. Biologists will find that it provides an approach to the ethics of animal rights which (...)
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