Search results for 'Humanities' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alan Bleakley, Robert Marshall & Rainer Brömer (2006). Toward an Aesthetic Medicine: Developing a Core Medical Humanities Undergraduate Curriculum. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (4):197-213.score: 27.0
    The medical humanities are often implemented in the undergraduate medicine curriculum through injection of discrete option courses as compensation for an overdose of science. The medical humanities may be reformulated as process and perspective, rather than content, where the curriculum is viewed as an aesthetic text and learning as aesthetic and ethical identity formation. This article suggests that a “humanities” perspective may be inherent to the life sciences required for study of medicine. The medical humanities emerge (...)
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  2. Neville Chiavaroli & Constance Ellwood (2012). The Medical Humanities and the Perils of Curricular Integration. Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):245-254.score: 27.0
    The advent of integration as a feature of contemporary medical curricula can be seen as an advantage for the medical humanities in that it provides a clear implementation strategy for the inclusion of medical humanities content and/or perspectives, while also making its relevance to medical education more apparent. This paper discusses an example of integration of humanities content into a graduate medical course, raises questions about the desirability of an exclusively integrated approach, and argues for the value (...)
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  3. Jeffrey P. Bishop (2008). Rejecting Medical Humanism: Medical Humanities and the Metaphysics of Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):15-25.score: 27.0
    The call for a narrative medicine has been touted as the cure-all for an increasingly mechanical medicine. It has been claimed that the humanities might create more empathic, reflective, professional and trustworthy doctors. In other words, we can once again humanise medicine through the addition of humanities. In this essay, I explore how the humanities, particularly narrative medicine, appeals to the metaphysical commitments of the medical institution in order to find its justification, and in so doing, perpetuates (...)
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  4. Howard Brody (2011). Defining the Medical Humanities: Three Conceptions and Three Narratives. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (1):1-7.score: 27.0
    The definition of ‘medical humanities’ may be approached via three conceptions—the humanities as a list of disciplines, as a program of moral development, and as a supportive friend. The conceptions are grounded by linking them to three narratives—respectively, the history of the modern liberal arts college; the history of Petrarch and the studia humanitatis of the early Renaissance; and the life of Sir William Osler. The three conceptions are complementary, each filling gaps in one or more of the (...)
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  5. H. M. Evans (2008). Affirming the Existential Within Medicine: Medical Humanities, Governance, and Imaginative Understanding. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):55-59.score: 27.0
    This paper first distinguishes governance (collective, autonomous self-regulatory processes) from government (externally-imposed mandatory regulation); it proposes that the second of these is essentially incompatible with a conception of the medical humanities that involves imagination and vision on the part of medical practitioners. It next develops that conception of the medical humanities, as having three distinguishable aspects (all of them distinct from the separate phenomena popularly known as “arts-in-health”): first, an intellectual enquiry into the nature of clinical medicine; second, (...)
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  6. Aliye Runyan, Katherine Ellington & Andrea Wershof Schwartz (2013). A Compelling Practice: Empowering Future Leaders in the Medical Humanities. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (4):493-495.score: 27.0
    Medical students and faculty explore the medical humanities for diverse reasons: as a medium for self-reflection, a means to cultivate professionalism and humanism, and a way to gain an appreciation for the broader contexts in which illness and health occur. One important area for development is increasing the exposure of learners and clinicians of various levels of training to the medical humanities and to role models in the field. Student-led programs in the medical humanities at the American (...)
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  7. Delese Wear (2009). The Medical Humanities: Toward a Renewed Praxis. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (4):209-220.score: 27.0
    In this essay, I explore medical humanities practice in the United States with descriptions offered by fifteen faculty members who participated in an electronic survey. The questions posed focused on the desirability of a core humanities curriculum in medical education; on the knowledge, skills, and values that are found in such a curriculum; and on who should teach medical humanities and make curriculum decisions regarding content and placement. I conclude with a call for a renewed interdisciplinarity in (...)
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  8. Judith Andre (2001). The Medical Humanities as an Elephant Seen by Blind Men. Medical Humanities Review.score: 27.0
    Because the medical humanities are multidisciplinary, participants tend to see one another's work through their own disciplinary lens. This can lead to misinterpretations.
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  9. Christina M. Gillis (2008). Medicine and Humanities: Voicing Connections. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):5-14.score: 27.0
    Accepting as a given that the humanities disciplines are not product or “results” driven, this paper argues that the core of an interdisciplinary field of medicine and humanities, or medical humanities, is an interpretive enterprise that is not readily open to quantitative assessment. A more humanistically oriented medical practice can derive, however, from the process that produces new insights and works toward the development of a new, mutually shared, and humanizing language.
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  10. M. G. Kidd & J. T. H. Connor (2008). Striving to Do Good Things: Teaching Humanities in Canadian Medical Schools. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):45-54.score: 27.0
    We provide the results of a systematic key-informant review of medical humanities curricula at fourteen of Canada’s seventeen medical schools. This survey was the first of its kind. We found a wide diversity of views among medical educators as to what constitutes the medical humanities, and a lack of consensus on how best to train medical students in the field. In fact, it is not clear that consensus has been attempted – or is even desirable – given that (...)
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  11. Lianne McTavish (2010). Practices of Looking and the Medical Humanities: Imagining the Unborn in France, 1550–1800. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):11-26.score: 27.0
    Visuality is a concept used to study vision as an historically and culturally specific activity. Curriculum in the medical humanities could address visuality by stressing how different kinds of practitioners and peoples learn how to see. This paper introduces the visual training promoted by the discipline of art history, analysing early modern French medical images of the unborn as a case study. The goal is to encourage medical practitioners to reflect on their own visual skills, comparing and contrasting them (...)
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  12. Susan M. Squier & Anne Hunsaker Hawkins (2004). Medical Humanities and Cultural Studies: Lessons Learned From an NEH Institute. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (4):243-253.score: 27.0
    In this essay, the directors of an NEH Institute on “Medicine, Literature, and Culture” consider the lessons they learned by bringing humanities scholars to a teaching hospital for a month-long institute that mingled seminar discussions, outside speakers and clinical observations. In an exchange of letters, they discuss the productive tensions inherent in approaching medicine from multiple perspectives, and they argue the case for a broader conception of medical humanities that incorporates the methodologies of cultural studies.
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  13. J. Russell Teagarden (2013). Well Connected: Pharmacy Education and the Humanities. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (4):477-480.score: 27.0
    Traditional pharmacy education emphasizes the biological processes of diseases and their pharmacological treatments. While the intense focus on biomedical aspects of disease is vital to educating pharmacy students, this focus is often insufficient in conveying what patients experience. The humanities, however, offer powerful characterizations of the disease experience for individuals as well as its impact on the human condition more generally. In this essay, I describe how using literary texts with pharmacy students provides them with a fuller appreciation of (...)
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  14. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Who Knows What - The War Between Science and the Humanities. Aeon.score: 24.0
    Whenever we try to make an inventory of humankind’s store of knowledge, we stumble into an ongoing battle between what CP Snow called ‘the two cultures’. On one side are the humanities, on the other are the sciences (natural and physical), with social science and philosophy caught somewhere in the middle. This is more than a turf dispute among academics. It strikes at the core of what we mean by human knowledge.
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  15. Edward G. Slingerland (2008). What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    What Science Offers the Humanities examines some of the deep problems facing current approaches to the study of culture. It focuses especially on the excesses of postmodernism, but also acknowledges serious problems with postmodernism's harshest critics. In short, Edward Slingerland argues that in order for the humanities to progress, its scholars need to take seriously contributions from the natural sciences—and particular research on human cognition—which demonstrate that any separation of the mind and the body is entirely untenable. The (...)
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  16. Mette Ebbesen (2008). The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development. Nanoethics 2 (3):333-333.score: 24.0
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence is created on (...)
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  17. Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.score: 24.0
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given that research in social (...)
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  18. Tom Cohen (ed.) (2001). Jacques Derrida and the Humanities: A Critical Reader. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The work of Jacques Derrida has transformed our understanding of a range of disciplines in the humanities through its questioning of some of the basic tenets of western metaphysics. This volume is a trans-disciplinary collection dedicated to his work; the assembled contributions - on law, literature, ethics, history, gender, politics and psychoanalysis, among others - constitute an investigation of the role of Derrida's work within the field of humanities, present and future. The volume is distinguished by work on (...)
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  19. Piccoli Barbara (2013). "Advice to the Medical Students in My Service": The Rediscovery of a Golden Book by Jean Hamburger, Father of Nephrology and of Medical Humanities. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):2-.score: 24.0
    Jean Hamburger (1909--1992) is considered the founder of the concept of medical intensive care (reanimation medicale) and the first to propose the name Nephrology for the branch of medicine dealing with kidney diseases. One of the first kidney grafts in the world (with short-term success), in 1953, and the first dialysis session in France, in 1955, were performed under his guidance. His achievements as a writer were at least comparable: Hamburger was awarded several important literary prizes, including prix Femina, prix (...)
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  20. Paola Spinozzi & Alessandro Zironi (eds.) (2010). Origins as a Paradigm in the Sciences and in the Humanities. V & R Unipress.score: 24.0
    The assumption that origins can be defined as a hermeneutic paradigm in the humanities and in the sciences is explored in relation to specific theoretical ...
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  21. Miles Little (2014). Perhaps Medicine Is One of the Humanities? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):265-266.score: 24.0
    Why on earth should literary skills, or even a love of literature, make for a better doctor? Gribble (1992) has argued that encouraging literary critical skills sharpens those specific skills but has no benefits that flow into other cognitive areas. Nussbaum (1995), per contra, has claimed that literature does indeed allow imaginative participation in situations that are ethically challenging and therefore encourages the development of phronesis, or practical wisdom. Robin Downie (1994) taught an immensely popular course on medicine and the (...)
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  22. William E. Stempsey (2007). Medical Humanities and Philosophy: Is the Universe Expanding or Contracting? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):373-383.score: 24.0
    The question of whether the universe is expanding or contracting serves as a model for current questions facing the medical humanities. The medical humanities might aptly be described as a metamedical multiverse encompassing many separate universes of discourse, the most prominent of which is probably bioethics. Bioethics, however, is increasingly developing into a new interdisciplinary discipline, and threatens to engulf the other medical humanities, robbing them of their own distinctive contributions to metamedicine. The philosophy of medicine considered (...)
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  23. H. M. Evans (2007). Medical Humanities: Stranger at the Gate, or Long-Lost Friend? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):363-372.score: 24.0
    “Medical humanities” is a phrase whose currency is wider than its agreed meaning or denotation. What sort of study is it, and what is its relation to the study of philosophy of medicine? This paper briefly reviews the origins of the current flowering of interest and activity in studies that are collectively called “medical humanities” and presents an account of its nature and central enquiries in which philosophical questions are unashamedly central. In the process this paper argues that (...)
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  24. Patrick Fuery (1997). Cultural Studies and the New Humanities: Concepts and Controversies. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The contemporary humanities--from "intertextuality" to "queer theory"--are a minefield of new theories and controversies. This book explores some of the new ways of thinking about the traditional arts and human sciences, providing historical background, defining key terms, and introducing the ideas of the important personalities.
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  25. Peter Levine (2009). Reforming the Humanities: Literature and Ethics From Dante Through Modern Times. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    This book combines contemporary ethical theory, literary interpretation, and historical narrative to defend a view of the humanities as a source of moral guidance. Peter Levine argues that moral philosophers should interpret narratives and literary critics should adopt moral positions. His new analysis of Dante’s story of Paolo and Francesca sheds new light on the moral advantages and pitfalls of narratives versus ethical theories and principles.
     
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  26. William E. Stempsey (2007). Medical Humanities: Introduction to the Theme. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):359-361.score: 24.0
    The Twentieth European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care was held in Helsinki, Finland, in August 2006 and highlighted the theme “Medicine, Philosophy and the Humanities.” The four papers in this thematic section are developed from presentations made at that conference.They are the work of physicians and philosophers and present fundamentally philosophical reflections on the medical humanities. The authors show that philosophy offers both a substantial way of humanizing the theory and practice of medicine and a (...)
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  27. Peter Pericles Trifonas & Michael Peters (eds.) (2005). Deconstructing Derrida: Tasks for the New Humanities. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Responding to Jacques Derrida's vision for what a "new" humanities should strive toward, Peter Trifonas and Michael Peters gather together in a single volume original essays by major scholars in the humanities today. Using Derrida's seven programmatic theses as a springboard, the contributors aim to reimagine, as Derrida did, the tasks for the new humanities in such areas as history of literature, history of democracy, history of profession, idea of sovereignty, and history of man.
     
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  28. William E. Stempsey (1999). The Quarantine of Philosophy in Medical Education: Why Teaching the Humanities May Not Produce Humane Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):3-9.score: 22.0
    Patients increasingly see physicians not as humane caregivers but as unfeeling technicians. The study of philosophy in medical school has been proposed to foster critical thinking about one's assumptions, perspectives and biases, encourage greater tolerance toward the ideas of others, and cultivate empathy. I suggest that the study of ethics and philosophy by medical students has failed to produce the humane physicians we seek because of the way the subject matter is quarantined in American medical education. First, the liberal arts (...)
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  29. Jens Høyrup (1995). As Regards the Humanities--: An Approach to Their Theory Through History and Philosophy. Max Planck Institute for the History of Science.score: 22.0
    pt. I. Institutions, professions and ideas -- pt. II. Human science and human nature -- pt. III. The art of knowing.
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  30. Paul A. Youngman (2012). 21st-Century Humanities: Art, Complexity, and Interdisciplinarity. Human Affairs 22 (2):111-121.score: 22.0
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  31. A. Woods (2011). The Limits of Narrative: Provocations for the Medical Humanities. Medical Humanities 37 (2):73-78.score: 21.0
    This paper aims to (re)ignite debate about the role of narrative in the medical humanities. It begins with a critical review of the ways in which narrative has been mobilised by humanities and social science scholars to understand the experience of health and illness. I highlight seven dangers or blind spots in the dominant medical humanities approach to narrative, including the frequently unexamined assumption that all human beings are ‘naturally narrative’. I then explore this assumption further through (...)
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  32. Alan Petersen, Governmentality, Critical Scholarship, and the Medical Humanities.score: 21.0
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  33. D. Flynn (2010). Narratives of Melancholy: A Humanities Approach to Depression. Medical Humanities 36 (1):36-39.score: 21.0
    This paper explores narrative literature as a means of inquiry into the sense of self in depression. Described as a disease, an identity and a way of life, depression is influenced by both internal and external factors. Although brain research has provided new insight into the relationship between neurotransmitter function and depression, the symptoms are experienced by individuals whose lives are intertwined with historical and sociocultural interpretations of illness and its manifestations. At the intersection of science and the humanities, (...)
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  34. J. Macnaughton (2000). The Humanities in Medical Education: Context, Outcomes and Structures. Medical Humanities 26 (1):23-30.score: 21.0
    There is now a context for teaching humanities in undergraduate medical education via special study modules (SSMs). This paper discusses the instrumental and non-instrumental role of the humanities in the education of doctors. Three courses are then described and compared. The most successful of the three is a SSM which had the following characteristics: it was voluntary, it was an integral part of the curriculum, and it was examinable.
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  35. R. Garden (2010). Disability and Narrative: New Directions for Medicine and the Medical Humanities. Medical Humanities 36 (2):70-74.score: 21.0
    Next SectionPeople with disabilities are a large minority that disproportionately seeks medical care. However, disability is relatively neglected in medical education and practice, and disabled people experience troubling differences and even disparities in healthcare. Practitioners can help improve healthcare for disabled people through disability studies, a multi-disciplinary field of enquiry that draws on the experiences and perspectives of people with disabilities to address discrimination. This article outlines a disability studies perspective on healthcare, specifically the rejection of the medicalisation of disability (...)
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  36. C. Hooker & E. Noonan (2011). Medical Humanities as Expressive of Western Culture. Medical Humanities 37 (2):79-84.score: 21.0
    In this paper we articulate a growing awareness within the field of the ways in which medical humanities could be deemed expressive of Western cultural values. The authors suggest that medical humanities is culturally limited by a pedagogical and scholarly emphasis on Western cultural artefacts, as well as a tendency to enact an uncritical reliance upon foundational concepts (such as ‘patient’ and ‘experience’) within Western medicine. Both these tendencies within the field, we suggest, are underpinned by a humanistic (...)
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  37. James S. Terry (1985). The Humanities and Gross Anatomy: Forgotten Alternatives. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 6 (2):90-98.score: 21.0
    Researchers in medical education have extensively studied negative reactions to gross anatomy, sometimes grouped under the term “the cadaver experience.” Although there has been disagreement about the extent and importance of such phenomena, several attempts at curricular reform have been designed to “humanize” the student-cadaver encounter. However, some obvious sources linking gross anatomy and the humanities have been consistently overlooked. Such sources—from the history of art, the history of anatomy, and autobiographical and imaginative literature—not only bear witness to the (...)
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  38. L. E. Acuna (2000). Don't Cry for Us Argentinians: Two Decades of Teaching Medical Humanities. Medical Humanities 26 (2):66-70.score: 21.0
    Medical humanities—history, literature, anthropology, ethics and fine arts applied to medicine—play an important role in medical education. For more than 20 years an effort has been made to obtain an academic identity for such a multidisciplinary approach. A distinction between humanitarianism and humanism is attempted here, the former being associated with medical care and the latter with medical education. In order more precisely to define the relationship between the arts and medicine, an alternative term “medical kalology”, as-yet-unsanctioned, coined after (...)
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  39. Alan Petersen, Alan Bleakley, Rainer Bromer & Rob Marshall, The Medical Humanities Today : Humane Health Care or Tool of Governance? [REVIEW]score: 21.0
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  40. PhD Michael Peters MA (2002). Derrida and the Tasks for the New Humanities: Postmodern Nursing and the Culture Wars. Nursing Philosophy 3 (1):47–57.score: 21.0
  41. M. Louis-Courvoisier (2005). How to Make the Most of History and Literature in the Teaching of Medical Humanities: The Experience of the University of Geneva. Medical Humanities 31 (1):51-54.score: 21.0
    Next SectionIn this paper the authors discuss the benefits of history and literature in the teaching of medical humanities. They suggest that human sciences produce a common effect, which they call distancing. Distancing is the awareness that one natural way to describe a given situation does not exist and that any point of view—scientific or not—is context dependant and culturally shaped. Distancing is important to medical students, by allowing them to become aware of the specificity of their own professional (...)
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  42. Donnie J. Self & DeWitt C. Baldwin (1990). Teaching Medical Humanities Through Film Discussions. Journal of Medical Humanities 11 (1):23-37.score: 21.0
    Following a brief consideration of two contrasting purposes for teaching the medical humanities, a description is given of a film discussion elective course. In contrast to the usual teaching of medical ethics which is primarily a cognitive activity emphasizing the development of a code of principles such as justice, autonomy, and beneficence, the film discussion elective was primarily an affective activity emphasizing the development of an ethical ideal of caring, relatedness, and sensitivity to others. The pass/fail elective, offered for (...)
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  43. James Mark Baldwin (1909/1980). Darwin and the Humanities. Ams Press.score: 21.0
  44. Gérald Berthoud & Beat Sitter-Liver (eds.) (1996). The Responsible Scholar: Ethical Considerations in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Watson Pub. International.score: 21.0
  45. Carolyn Birdsall (ed.) (2009). Inside Knowledge: (Un)Doing Ways of Knowing in the Humanities. Cambridge Scholars Pub..score: 21.0
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  46. Ernst Cassirer (1961). The Logic of the Humanities. New Haven, Yale University Press.score: 21.0
     
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  47. Jan Faye (2012). After Postmodernism: A Naturalistic Reconstruction of the Humanities. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 21.0
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  48. David E. Hayes-Bautista (1992). The Intellectual Basis for Latino AIDS Policy: Towards the Humanities and Health Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (4):235-246.score: 21.0
    The AIDS epidemic touches upon basic humanities themes: sex, death and social worth, to name just three. AIDS policy in general builds upon society's discourse on these topics. The growing Latino population (25% of California and Texas) needs an AIDS policy that builds upon the Latino humanities tradition. The contours of the Latino intellectual tradition, as focused on issues attendant to health, are presented, with examples from Aztec, colonial and modern times.
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  49. David Holbrook (1987). Evolution and the Humanities. St. Martin's Press.score: 21.0
     
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  50. Martin Kohn (1989). Context, Voice and Choice: A Curricular Framework for the Medical Humanities. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (2):93-98.score: 21.0
    Although the humanities' place in the medical school curriculum has been established, how we can best approach our teaching remains unanswered. A curricular framework which addresses process, as well as subject matter and structure is needed. A process-oriented framework demands that we enhance our student's ability to contextualize experience through multiple realms of meaning; encourage our students in the struggle to find a voice; and once a voice is found, to endow our students with the courage to let it (...)
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