Search results for 'Humanity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). The Motivation Question: Arguments From Justice, and From Humanity. British Journal of Political Science 42:661-678.score: 24.0
    There are many interesting questions to ask about cosmopolitan arguments. Is it true that the sphere of moral concern is global? Which sets of actions would realize the outcomes of global justice that cosmopolitans seek? Are those sets of actions feasible, and when we compare them against each other, which is the most feasible? The question I want to focus on in this paper is a question of the latter kind, but I want to take a slightly unique approach to (...)
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  2. Richard Dean (2006). The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The humanity formulation of Kant's Categorical Imperative demands that we treat humanity as an end in itself. Because this principle resonates with currently influential ideals of human rights and dignity, contemporary readers often find it compelling, even if the rest of Kant's moral philosophy leaves them cold. Moreover, some prominent specialists in Kant's ethics have recently turned to the humanity formulation as the most theoretically central and promising principle of Kant's ethics. Nevertheless, it has received less attention (...)
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  3. Adam Cureton (2013). A Contractualist Reading of Kant's Proof of the Formula of Humanity. Kantian Review 18 (3):363-386.score: 24.0
    Kant offers the following argument for the formula of humanity (FH): Each rational agent necessarily conceives of her own rational nature as an end in itself and does so on the same grounds as every other rational agent, so all rational agents must conceive of one another's rational nature as an end in itself. As it stands, the argument appears to be question-begging and fallacious. Drawing on resources from the formula of universal law (FUL) and Kant's claims about the (...)
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  4. N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen & Jeff McMahan (eds.) (2010). Ethics and Humanity: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Glover. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Ethics and Humanity pays to tribute to Jonathan Glover, a pioneering figure whose thought and personal influence have had a significant impact on applied ...
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  5. Richard Dean (2013). Humanity as an Idea, as an Ideal, and as an End in Itself. Kantian Review 18 (2):171-195.score: 24.0
    Kant emphasizes that moral philosophy must be divided into two parts, a metaphysics of morals, and an empirical application to individuals, which Kant calls 'moral anthropology'. But Kant gives humanity (die Menschheit) a prominent role even in the purely rational part of ethics – for example, one formulation of the categorical imperative is a demand to treat humanity as an end in itself. This paper argues that the only concepts of humanity suited to play such a role (...)
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  6. Thierry Meynard (ed.) (2006). Teilhard and the Future of Humanity. Fordham University Press.score: 24.0
    Fifty years after his death, the thought of the French scientist and Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881–1955) continues to inspire new ways of understanding humanity’s future. Trained as a paleontologist and philosopher, Teilhard was an innovative synthesizer of science and religion, developing an idea of evolution as an unfolding of material and mental worlds into an integrated, holistic universe at what he called the Omega Point. His books, such as the bestselling The Phenomenon of Man, have influenced generations (...)
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  7. Sven Nyholm (2013). On Kant's Idea of Humanity as an End in Itself. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2).score: 24.0
    Writers like Christine Korsgaard and Allen Wood understand Kant's idea of rational nature as an end in itself as a commitment to a substantive value. This makes it hard for them to explain the supposed equivalence between the universal law and humanity formulations of the categorical imperative, since the former does not appear to assert any substantive value. Nor is it easy for defenders of value-based readings to explain Kant's claim that the law-giving nature of practical reason makes all (...)
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  8. James A. Stieb (2007). On “Bettering Humanity” in Science and Engineering Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):265-273.score: 24.0
    Authors such as Krishnasamy Selvan argue that “all human endeavors including engineering and science” have a single primary objective: “bettering humanity.” They favor discussing “the history of science and measurement uncertainty.” This paper respectfully disagrees and argues that “human endeavors including engineering and science” should not pursue “bettering humanity” as their primary objective. Instead these efforts should first pursue individual betterment. One cannot better humanity without knowing what that means. However, there is no one unified theory of (...)
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  9. Ilana Feldman & Miriam Iris Ticktin (eds.) (2010). In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care. Duke University Press.score: 24.0
    "In a complex world where competing groups claim to be speaking on behalf of incommensurate versions of 'humanity, ' the authors represented in "In the Name of ...
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  10. G. E. R. Lloyd (2012). Being, Humanity, and Understanding: Studies in Ancient and Modern Societies. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Humanity between gods and beasts? -- Error -- Ancient understandings reassessed and the consequences for ontologies -- Language and audiences -- Philosophical implications.
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  11. Steve Fuller (2013). Preparing for Life in Humanity 2. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Philosophy for Humanity 2.0 -- Political economy for Humanity 2.0 -- Anthropology for Humanity 2.0 -- Ethics for Humanity 2.0 -- Epilogue: General education for Humanity 2.0: a focus on the brain.
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  12. Bruce Mazlish (2009). The Idea of Humanity in a Global Era. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    The result of a lifetime of research and contemplation on global phenomena, this book explores the idea of humanity in the modern age of globalization. Tracking the idea in the historical, philosophical, legal, and political realms, this is a concise and illuminating look at a concept that has defined the twentieth century.
     
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  13. Sven Nyholm (2012). On the Universal Law and Humanity Formulas. Dissertation, University of Michiganscore: 24.0
    Whereas the universal law formula says to choose one’s basic guiding principles (or “maxims”) on the basis of their fitness to serve as universal laws, the humanity formula says to always treat the humanity in each person as an end, and never as a means only. Commentators and critics have been puzzled by Kant’s claims that these are two alternative statements of the same basic law, and have raised various objections to Kant’s suggestion that these are the most (...)
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  14. Sonia Sikka (2011). Herder on Humanity and Cultural Difference: Enlightened Relativism. Cambridge University Press.score: 22.0
    Machine generated contents note: Note on citation style; Abbreviations and works cited by title; Introduction; 1. The question of moral relativism; 2. Happiness and the moral life; 3. History and human destiny; 4. The concept of race; 5. Language and world; 6. The place of reason; 7. Religious diversity; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index.
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  15. Aimee Bolletino (2008). Crimes Against Humanity in Colombia: The International Criminal Court's Jurisdiction Over the May 2003 Attack on the Betoyes Guahibo Indigenous Reserve and Colombian Accountability. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 9 (4):491-511.score: 22.0
    The Colombian military and the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) have committed systematic attacks against the Colombian people that violate international law. One such heinous incident took place in May 2003 at the Betoyes Guahibo indigenous reserve in Colombia. Unlike other acts of terror, the attack at the Reserve is well documented. Because of this, the attack on the Reserve is an excellent case for International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecution. This article exposes acts of cruelty and makes a persuasive (...)
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  16. Zachary Hoskins (2008). Review: The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory - by Richard Dean. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 49 (2):150-152.score: 21.0
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  17. David Brog (2010). In Defense of Faith: The Judeo-Christian Idea and the Struggle for Humanity. Encounter Books.score: 21.0
    Introduction: The sanctity of life and its discontents -- Our morality : selfish genes and cultural clout -- The Judeo-Christian idea : transcending our selfish genes -- The Judeo-Christian idea against genocide -- The Judeo-Christian idea against slavery -- Falling backwards : the abandonment of the Judeo-Christian idea and the return of genocide and slavery -- The rising : the Judeo-Christian idea in the post-war world -- The myth of biblical immorality -- The myth ofJudeo-Christian atrocities -- The myth of (...)
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  18. David Cannadine (2013). The Undivided Past: Humanity Beyond Our Differences. Alfred A. Knopf.score: 21.0
    Religion -- Nation -- Class -- Gender -- Race -- Civilization.
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  19. Laura K. Davis & Cristina Santos (eds.) (2010). The Monster Imagined: Humanity's Recreation of Monsters and Monstrosity. Inter-Disciplinary.score: 21.0
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  20. Marshall Marinker (ed.) (2001). Medicine and Humanity. King's Fund.score: 21.0
     
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  21. Joe Hoover (2013). Towards a Politics for Human Rights: Ambiguous Humanity and Democratizing Rights. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (9):0191453713498390.score: 20.0
    Human rights are a suspect project – this seems the only sensible starting point today. This suspicion, however, is not absolute and the desire to preserve and reform human rights persists for many of us. The most important contemporary critiques of human rights focus on the problematic consequences of the desire for universal rights. Some defenders of human rights accept elements of this critique in their reformulations, but opponents remain wary of the desire to think and act in human rights (...)
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  22. Alan Clune (2011). Deeper Problems for Noonan's Probability Argument Against Abortion: On a Charitable Reading of Noonan's Conception Criterion of Humanity. Bioethics 25 (5):280-289.score: 18.0
    In ‘An Almost Absolute Value in History’ John T. Noonan criticizes several attempts to provide a criterion for when an entity deserves rights. These criteria, he argues are either arbitrary or lead to absurd consequence. Noonan proposes human conception as the criterion of rights, and justifies it by appeal to the sharp shift in probability, at conception, of becoming a being possessed of human reason. Conception, then, is when abortion becomes immoral.The article has an historical and a philosophical goal. The (...)
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  23. Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (1995). Making Sense of Humanity and Other Philosophical Papers, 1982-1993. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This new volume of philosophical papers by Bernard Williams is divided into three sections: the first Action, Freedom, Responsibility, the second Philosophy, Evolution and the Human Sciences; in which appears the essay which gives the collection its title; and the third Ethics, which contains essays closely related to his 1983 book Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. Like the two earlier volumes of Williams's papers published by Cambridge University Press, Problems of the Self and Moral Luck, this volume will be (...)
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  24. Stephen Wallace (2008). Governing Humanity. Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):27-32.score: 18.0
    In the United Kingdom, clinical governance has become a master narrative for health care over the last decade. While many see this political imperative as embodying both enlightening and humanistic goals, I argue that it has also become an apparatus for resuscitating a hypermodernist worldview which further conceals the political drivers of health care delivery. While resistance to clinical governance seems futile, insistence on the inclusion of historical analysis in understanding modern health care delivery may be profitable. Drawing from selected (...)
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  25. Kwame Gyekye (2004). Beyond Cultures: Perceiving a Common Humanity: Ghanian Philosophical Studies, Iii. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.score: 17.0
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  26. Selvan T. Krishnasamy (2008). Comments on 'on “Bettering Humanity” in Science and Engineering Education'. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):291-293.score: 17.0
    The object of this communication is to reflect on the recent article by James Stieb in relation to an earlier article by Selvan.
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  27. Edmond Barbotin (1975). The Humanity of Man. Orbis Books.score: 17.0
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  28. Eliot Deutsch (1970). Humanity and Divinity. Honolulu,University of Hawaii Press.score: 17.0
     
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  29. Gilles Lamoureux (2004). Towards the Death of Humanity: Dehumanization: The Affliction Destroying Mankind and Modern Society, Immunologist and Emeritus Professor. Authorhouse.score: 17.0
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  30. S. J. Samartha & Lynn De Silva (eds.) (1979). Man in Nature: Guest or Engineer?: A Preliminary Enquiry by Christians and Buddhists Into the Religious Dimensions in Humanity's Relation to Nature. Ecumenical Institute for Study and Dialogue in Co-Operation with the World Council of Churches.score: 17.0
     
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  31. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). How Can Our Human World Exist and Best Flourish Embedded in the Physical Universe? A Letter to an Applicant to a New Liberal Studies Course. On the Horizon 22 (1).score: 14.0
    In this paper I sketch a liberal studies course designed to explore our fundamental problem of thought and life: How can our human world exist and best flourish embedded as it is in the physical universe? The fundamental character of this problem provides one with the opportunity to explore a wide range of issues. What does physics tell us about the universe and ourselves? How do we account for everything physics leaves out? How can living brains be conscious? If everything (...)
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  32. Steve Fuller (2012). The Art of Being Human: A Project for General Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):113-123.score: 14.0
    Throughout the medieval and modern periods, in various sacred and secular guises, the unification of all forms of knowledge under the rubric of ‘science’ has been taken as the prerogative of humanity as a species. However, as our sense of species privilege has been called increasingly into question, so too has the very salience of ‘humanity’ and ‘science’ as general categories, let alone ones that might bear some essential relationship to each other. After showing how the ascendant Stanford (...)
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  33. Antoon De Baets (2012). Does Inhumanity Breed Humanity? Investigation of a Paradox. History and Theory 51 (3):451-465.score: 14.0
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  34. Lawrence Burns (2008). What is the Scope for the Interpretation of Dignity in Research Involving Human Subjects? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):191-208.score: 14.0
    Drawing on Lennart Nordenfelt’s distinction between the four distinct senses of dignity, I elucidate the meaning of dignity in the context of research involving human subjects. I acknowledge that different interpretations of the personal senses of dignity may be acceptable in human subject research, but that inherent dignity (Menschenwürde) is not open to interpretation in the same way. In order to map out the grounds for interpreting dignity, I examine the unique application of the principle of respect for dignity in (...)
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  35. Ryan Preston-Roedder (2013). Faith in Humanity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (3):664-687.score: 12.0
    History and literature provide striking examples of people who are morally admirable, in part, because of their profound faith in people’s decency. But moral philosophers have largely ignored this trait, and I suspect that many philosophers would view such faith with suspicion, dismissing it as a form of naïvete or as some other objectionable form of irrationality. I argue that such suspicion is misplaced, and that having a certain kind of faith in people’s decency, which I call faith in (...), is a centrally important moral virtue. In order to make this view intuitively more plausible, I discuss two moral exemplars – one historical and the other literary – whose lives vividly exhibit such faith. Then I provide a rationale for the view that having such faith is morally admirable. Finally, I discuss cases in which someone’s faith in humanity can lead her to make judgments that are, to some degree, epistemically irrational. I argue that the existence of such cases does not pose a serious objection to the view that having faith in humanity is a moral virtue. Rather, it makes salient important limits on the role that epistemic, as opposed to practical, rationality should occupy in our ideals of how to live. (shrink)
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  36. Nicholas Maxwell (2013). Does Philosophy Betray Both Reason and Humanity? Changed Without the Author's Knowledge To: 'Knowledge or Wisdom?'. The Philosophers' Magazine (62):17-18.score: 12.0
    A bad philosophy of inquiry, built into the intellectual/institutional structure of universities round the world, betrays both reason and humanity.
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  37. Japa Pallikkathayil (2010). Deriving Morality From Politics: Rethinking the Formula of Humanity. Ethics 121 (1):116-147.score: 12.0
    Kant's Formula of Humanity famously forbids treating others merely as a means. It is unclear, however, what exactly treating someone merely as a means comes to. This essay argues against an interpretation of this idea advanced by Christine Korsgaard and Onora O'Neill. The essay then develops a new interpretation that suggests an important connection between the Formula of Humanity and Kant's political philosophy: the content of many of our moral duties depends on the results of political philosophy and, (...)
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  38. Simon Caney (2011). Humanity, Associations and Global Justice: A Defence of Humanity-Centred Cosmopolitan Egalitarianism. The Monist 94 (4):506-534.score: 12.0
    This paper defends an egalitarian conception of global justice against two kinds of criticism. Many who defend egalitarian principles of justice do so on the basis that all humans are part of a common 'association' of some kind. In this paper I defend the humanity-centred approach which holds that persons should be included within the scope of distributive justice simply because they are fellow human beings. The paper has four substantive sections - the first addresses Andrea Sangiovanni's reciprocity-based argument (...)
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  39. Eric Dietrich (2007). After the Humans Are Gone. Philosophy Now 61 (May/June):16-19.score: 12.0
    Recently, on the History Channel, artificial intelligence (AI) was singled out, with much wringing of hands, as one of the seven possible causes of the end of human life on Earth. I argue that the wringing of hands is quite inappropriate: the best thing that could happen to humans, and the rest of life of on planet Earth, would be for us to develop intelligent machines and then usher in our own extinction.
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  40. Allen E. Buchanan (2011). Beyond Humanity?: The Ethics of Biomedical Enhancement. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    In Beyond Humanity a leading philosopher offers a powerful and controversial exploration of urgent ethical issues concerning human enhancement.
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  41. Ted Honderich, Humanity, Terrorisms in Palestine, Innocent Victims.score: 12.0
    This is a new discussion in the philosophy of terrorism of (1) the morality of Humanity, (2) Palestine and Israel, (3) right and wrong, liberalism, free riders, narratives, (4) definitions of terrorism, (5) objections to definitions not mentioning innocents, (6) the question of who the innocents are, (7) intentional action, (8) objections having to do with definitions, (9) inquiry, prejudice, pure inquiry, and advocacy, and (10) other innocents. The discussion was prompted by a forthcoming paper by Tamar Meisels of (...)
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  42. Adrienne M. Martin (2006). How to Argue for the Value of Humanity. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):96–125.score: 12.0
    Significant effort has been devoted to locating a good argument for Kant's Formula of Humanity. In this paper, I contrast two arguments, based on Kant's text, for the Formula of Humanity. The first, which I call the 'Valued Ends' argument, is an influential and appealing argument developed most notably by Christine Korsgaard and Allen Wood. Notwithstanding the appeal and influence of this argument, it ultimately fails on several counts. I therefore present as an alternative the 'Autonomy' argument, which (...)
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  43. Joshua Glasgow (2007). Kant's Conception of Humanity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):291-308.score: 12.0
    Contemporary Kant scholarship generally takes Kant’s conception of humanity in his ethical writings to refer to beings with rational capacities. 1 According to this interpretation, when Kant tells us in the Categorical Imperative’s Formula of Humanity [FH] to “act so that you use humanity…always at the same time as an end, never merely as a means,” we are to treat anyone with rational capacities this way. 2 However, Richard Dean has recently revived an alternative interpretation that he (...)
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  44. Lawrence Masek (2008). Treating Humanity as an Inviolable End. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (1):1-16.score: 12.0
    I argue that contraception is morally wrong but that periodic abstinence (or natural family planning) is not. Further, I argue that altered nuclear transfer—a proposed technique for creating human stem cells without destroying human embryos—is morally wrong for the same reason that contraception is. Contrary to what readers might expect, my argument assumes nothing about the morality of cloning or abortion and requires no premises about God or natural teleology. Instead, I argue that contraception and altered nuclear transfer are morally (...)
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  45. Andrew Wernick (2001). Auguste Comte and the Religion of Humanity: The Post-Theistic Program of French Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    This book offers an exciting re-interpretation of Auguste Comte, the founder of French sociology. Following the development of his philosophy of positivism, Comte later focused on the importance of the emotions in his philosophy resulting in the creation of a new religious system, the Religion of Humanity. Andrew Wernick provides the first in-depth critique of Comte's concept of religion and its place in his thinking on politics, sociology and philosophy of science. He places Comte's ideas in the context of (...)
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  46. Hektor K. T. Yan (2010). Cosmopolitanism and What It Means to Be Human: Rethinking Ancient and Modern Views on Discerning Humanity. Philosophia 38 (1):107-129.score: 12.0
    This paper takes a conceptual look at cosmopolitanism and the related issue of what it means to be human in order to arrive at an alternative conceptual framework which is free from empiricist assumptions. With reference to a discussion on Homer’s Iliad , the author develops a ‘humanist’ model of discerning humanity. This model is then compared and contrasted with Martha Nussbaum’s version of cosmopolitanism. The notion of ‘aspect-seeing’ discussed by Wittgenstein in the second part of the Philosophical Investigations (...)
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  47. William Nelson (2008). Kant's Formula of Humanity. Mind 117 (465):85-106.score: 12.0
    This paper is concerned with the normative content of Kant's formula of humanity (FH). More specifically, does FH, as some seem to think, imply the specific and rigid prescriptions in 'standard' deontological theories? To this latter question, I argue, the answer is 'no'. I propose reading FH largely through the formula of autonomy and the formula of the kingdom of ends, where I understand FA to describe the nature of the capacity of humanity-a capacity for self-governance. The latter, (...)
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  48. Nick Bostrom (2009). The Future of Humanity. In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Evan Selinger & Søren Riis (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Technology. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
    The future of humanity is often viewed as a topic for idle speculation. Yet our beliefs and assumptions on this subject matter shape decisions in both our personal lives and public policy – decisions that have very real and sometimes unfortunate consequences. It is therefore practically important to try to develop a realistic mode of futuristic thought about big picture questions for humanity. This paper sketches an overview of some recent attempts in this direction, and it offers a (...)
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  49. Massimo Renzo (2012). Crimes Against Humanity and the Limits of International Criminal Law. Law and Philosophy 31 (4):443-476.score: 12.0
    Crimes against humanity are supposed to have a collective dimension with respect both to their victims and their perpetrators. According to the orthodox view, these crimes can be committed by individuals against individuals, but only in the context of a widespread or systematic attack against the group to which the victims belong. In this paper I offer a new conception of crimes against humanity and a new justification for their international prosecution. This conception has important implications as to (...)
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  50. Andrews Reath, Formal Approaches to Kant's Formula of Humanity.score: 12.0
    My aim in this paper is to explore different ways of understanding Kant’s Formula of Humanity as a formal principle. I believe that a formal principle for Kant is a principle that is constitutive of some domain of cognition or rational activity. It is a principle that both constitutively guides that activity and serves as its internal regulative norm. In the first section of this essay, I explain why it is desirable to find a way to understand the Formula (...)
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