Search results for 'Humor' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Morreall (2009). Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor develops an inclusive theory that integrates psychological, aesthetic, and ethical issues relating to humor Offers an enlightening and accessible foray into the serious business of humor Reveals how standard theories of humor fail to explain its true nature and actually support traditional prejudices against humor as being antisocial, irrational, and foolish Argues that humor’s benefits overlap significantly with those of philosophy Includes a foreword by Robert Mankoff, Cartoon (...)
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  2. David Benatar (2014). Taking Humour (Ethics) Seriously, But Not Too Seriously. Journal of Practical Ethics 2 (1):24-43.
    Humour is worthy of serious ethical consideration. However, it is often taken far too seriously. In this paper, it is argued that while humour is sometimes unethical, it is wrong much less often than many people think. Non-contextual criticisms, which claim that certain kinds of humour are always wrong, are rejected. Contextual criticisms, which take issue with particular instances of humour rather than types of humour, are more promising. However, it is common to overstate the number of contexts in which (...)
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  3. John Morreall (ed.) (1986). The Philosophy of Laughter and Humor. State University of New York Press.
    This book assesses the adequacy of the traditional theories of laughter and humor, suggests revised theories, and explores such areas as the aesthetics and ethics of humor, and the relation of amusement to other mental states. Theories of laughter and humor originated in ancient times with the view that laughter is an expression of feelings of superiority over another person. This superiority theory was held by Plato, Aristotle, and Hobbes. Another aspect of laughter, noted by Aristotle and (...)
     
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  4. Aaron Smuts (2006). Humor. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    According to the standard analysis, humor theories can be classified into three neatly identifiable groups:incongruity, superiority, and relief theories. Incongruity theory is the leading approach and includes historical figures such as Immanuel Kant, Søren Kierkegaard, and perhaps has its origins in comments made by Aristotle in the Rhetoric. Primarily focusing on the object of humor, this school sees humor as a response to an incongruity, a term broadly used to include ambiguity, logical impossibility, irrelevance, and inappropriateness. The (...)
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  5. Aaron Smuts (2007). The Joke is the Thing: 'In the Company of Men' and the Ethics of Humor. Film and Philosophy 11 (1):49-66.
    Any analysis of "In the Company of Men" is forced to answer three questions of central importance to the ethics of humor: What does it mean to find sexist humor funny? What are the various sources of humor? And, can moral flaws with attempts at humor increase their humorousness? I argued that although merely finding a joke funny in a neutral context cannot tell you anything reliable about a person's beliefs, in context, a joke may reveal (...)
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  6. E. M. Dadlez (2011). Truly Funny: Humor, Irony, and Satire as Moral Criticism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):1-17.
    Comparatively speaking, philosophy has not been especially long-winded in attempting to answer questions about what is funny and why we should think so. There is the standard debate of many centuries’ standing between superiority and incongruity accounts of humor, which for the most part attempt to identify the intentional objects of our amusement.1 There is the more recent debate about humor and morality, about whether jokes themselves may be regarded as immoral or about whether it can in certain (...)
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  7.  94
    Brian Ribeiro (2008). A Distance Theory of Humour. Think 6 (17/18):139-148.
    This paper develops a programmatic 'theory sketch' of a new theory of humour, pitched at roughly the same level of detail, and intended to have roughly the same level of inclusiveness, as the other available philosophical "theories" of humour. I will call the theory I propose the distance theory. After an appeal to some intuitive illustrations of the distance theory's attractions, I move on to offer an analysis of observational comedy using the distance theory. I conclude the paper with some (...)
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  8.  16
    Rachel Hull, Sümeyra Tosun & Jyotsna Vaid (forthcoming). What's so Funny? Modelling Incongruity in Humour Production. Cognition and Emotion:1-16.
    Finding something humorous is intrinsically rewarding and may facilitate emotion regulation, but what creates humour has been underexplored. The present experimental study examined humour generated under controlled conditions with varying social, affective, and cognitive factors. Participants listed five ways in which a set of concept pairs (e.g. MONEY and CHOCOLATE) were similar or different in either a funny way (intentional humour elicitation) or a “catchy” way (incidental humour elicitation). Results showed that more funny responses were produced under the incidental condition, (...)
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  9.  10
    Georges B. Dreyfus (2008). What is Debate For? The Rationality of Tibetan Debates and the Role of Humor. Argumentation 22 (1):43-58.
    In this essay, I examine the mode of operation and aim of debates in the Tibetan Buddhist traditions. I contrast the probative form of argument that was privileged by the Indian tradition to the more agonic practice favored by Tibetan scholastics. I also examine the rules that preside over this dialectical practice, which is seen by the Tibetan tradition as essential to a proper scholastic education. I argue, however, that the practice of debates cannot be reduced to this dialectical model, (...)
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  10.  84
    Shayne Clarke (2009). Locating Humour in Indian Buddhist Monastic Law Codes: A Comparative Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (4):311-330.
    It has been claimed that Indian Buddhism, as opposed to East Asian Chan/Zen traditions, was somehow against humour. In this paper I contend that humour is discernible in canonical Indian Buddhist texts, particularly in Indian Buddhist monastic law codes (Vinaya). I will attempt to establish that what we find in these texts sometimes is not only humourous but that it is intentionally so. I approach this topic by comparing different versions of the same narratives preserved in Indian Buddhist monastic law (...)
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  11.  4
    Justine T. Kao, Roger Levy & Noah D. Goodman (2016). A Computational Model of Linguistic Humor in Puns. Cognitive Science 40 (5):1270-1285.
    Humor plays an essential role in human interactions. Precisely what makes something funny, however, remains elusive. While research on natural language understanding has made significant advancements in recent years, there has been little direct integration of humor research with computational models of language understanding. In this paper, we propose two information-theoretic measures—ambiguity and distinctiveness—derived from a simple model of sentence processing. We test these measures on a set of puns and regular sentences and show that they correlate significantly (...)
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  12.  81
    Martin Shuster (2013). Humor as an Optics: Bergson and the Ethics of Humor. Hypatia 28 (3):618-632.
    Although the ethics of humor is a relatively new field, it already seems to have achieved a consensus about ethics in general. In this paper, I implicitly (1) question the view of ethics that stands behind many discussions in the ethics of humor; I do this by explicitly (2) focusing on what has been a chief preoccupation in the ethics of humor: the evaluation of humor. Does the immoral content of a joke make it more or (...)
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  13.  14
    Justine T. Kao, Roger Levy & Noah D. Goodman (2015). A Computational Model of Linguistic Humor in Puns. Cognitive Science 40 (1).
    Humor plays an essential role in human interactions. Precisely what makes something funny, however, remains elusive. While research on natural language understanding has made significant advancements in recent years, there has been little direct integration of humor research with computational models of language understanding. In this paper, we propose two information-theoretic measures—ambiguity and distinctiveness—derived from a simple model of sentence processing. We test these measures on a set of puns and regular sentences and show that they correlate significantly (...)
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  14.  14
    Rik Peels (2015). Does God Have a Sense of Humor? Faith and Philosophy 32 (3):271-292.
    This paper provides a defense of the thesis that God has a sense of humor. First, I sketch the four main theories of what it is to have a sense of humor that we find in the literature. Next, I argue that three arguments against the thesis that God has a sense of humor fail to convince. Then, I consider what one might take to be four biblical reasons to think that God has a sense of (...) and argue that none of them are convincing. Subsequently, I give three philosophical reasons to think that God (if he exists) has a sense of humor, that is, reasons that any person who grasps the concept of God should be willing to embrace. These arguments differ in strength, but I argue that, jointly, they provide us with sufficient reason to think that God has a sense of humor. Finally, I spell out three implications of the idea that God has a sense of humor. (shrink)
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  15.  70
    Andrew Jordan & Stephanie Patridge (2012). Against the Moralistic Fallacy: A Modest Defense of a Modest Sentimentalism About Humor. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):83-94.
    In a series of important papers, Justin D’Arms and Daniel Jacobson argue that all extant neo-sentimentalists are guilty of a conflation error that they call the moralistic fallacy. One commits the moralistic fallacy when one infers from the fact that it would be morally wrong to experience an affective attitude—e.g., it would be wrong to be amused—that the attitude does not fit its object—e.g., that it is not funny. Such inferences, they argue, conflate the appropriateness conditions of attitudinal responses with (...)
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  16. Alan Roberts (forthcoming). Humour is a Funny Thing. British Journal of Aesthetics.
    This paper considers the question of how immoral elements in instances of humour affect funniness. Comic ethicism is the position that each immoral element negatively affects funniness and if their cumulative effect is sufficient, then funniness is eliminated. I focus on Berys Gaut’s (1998, 2007) central argument in favour of comic ethicism; the merited response argument. Noël Carroll (2014) has criticized the merited response argument as illegitimately conflating comic merit with moral merit. I argue that the merited response argument, and (...)
     
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  17.  8
    Aaron Smuts (forthcoming). L'Humor. In Julien Deonna Emma Tieffenbach (ed.), Petite Dictionnaire des Valeurs.
    Most everything one might think about humor is in dispute. Only a few negative claims are fairly clear. Does humor always involve feelings of superiority? Probably not. But what properties do objects need in order to be amusing? Most plausibly, humorous objects present non-threatening incongruities. However, not all such incongruities are amusing. So there must be something more. -/- What is the connection between feelings of amusement and laughter? Amusement typically leads to laughter, but not always. And we (...)
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  18.  43
    John Marmysz (2010). Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):305-308.
    A review of John Morrreall's book Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor.
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  19.  5
    Edgardo Cifuentes (2015). Angustia y humor en Papelucho de Marcela Paz. Logos: Revista de Lingüística, Filosofía y Literatura 25 (2):131-139.
    Los estudios clásicos sobre el humor identifican una interrelación estrecha entre humor y angustia. En la serie narrativa Papelucho, esta interacción es constante en la trama de las distintas novelas. Este trabajo describe la interacción entre humor y angustia que se da en la obra y reflexiona sobre su sentido. Se concluye que la serie propone el humor como estrategia para enfrentar los hechos angustiantes ineludibles en la vida.
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  20.  32
    Aaron Smuts (2003). Review of Simon Critchley, On Humour. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (4):414-416.
    The highlight of Simon Critchley's small book On Humor (2002) is the inclusion of seven beautiful prints by Charles Le Brun at the start of each chapter. Le Brun's captivating drawings are zoomorphic studies of the human face, each in relation to a different animal.
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  21.  12
    Brenda Goldberg (1999). A Genealogy of the Ridiculous: From 'Humours' to Humour. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 1 (1):59-71.
    We tend to take the phenomenon of humour for granted, seeing it for the most part as something innately and fundamentally human. However we might go even further than this, and say that the phenomenon of humour is perceived as an essential part of what makes us human. In this respect, philosophers and theorists as wide apart as Aristotle and the French, feminist Julia Kristeva (1980; also see Goldberg, 1999a) have regarded a baby's ability to laugh as one of the (...)
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  22.  5
    Robert Storey (2003). Humor and Sexual Selection. Human Nature 14 (4):319-336.
    Recently Geoffrey Miller has suggested that humor evolved through sexual selection as a signal of "creativity," which in turn implies youthfulness, intelligence, and adaptive unpredictability. Drawing upon available empirical studies, I argue that the evidence for a link between humor and creativity is weak and ambiguous. I also find only tenuous support for Miller’s assumption that the attractiveness of the "sense of humor" is to be found in the wittiness of its possessor, since those who use the (...)
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  23.  4
    Alejandro Angulo-Novoa sj (2008). La metafísica del humor de A. Garzón. Logos 14:107-114.
    La caricatura de Garzón, que aparece en el periódico El Espectador con el título de Cartones, es una caricatura filosófica, un dibujo del alma humana, en contraste con la de su contemporáneo Osuna que es la clásica caricatura política. Garzón prescinde, en general, de las palabras y critica con humor seco la insensatez. Adopta en sus dibujos del alma una posición ética que repudia el espíritu mercantil de nuestra época. El hombrecillo protagonista de sus dibujos recuerda los hombres grises, (...)
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  24. Sharon Lockyer & Michael Pickering (eds.) (2005). Beyond a Joke: The Limits of Humour. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Humor is pervasive in contemporary culture, and is generally celebrated as a public good. Yet there are times when it is felt to produce intolerance, misunderstanding or even hatred. This book brings together, for the first time, contributions that consider the ethics as well as the aesthetics of humor. The book focuses on the abuses and limits of humor, some of which excite considerable social tension and controversy. Beyond a Joke is an exciting intervention, full of challenging (...)
     
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  25.  45
    John Marmysz (2003). Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism. SUNY Press.
    Disputing the common misconception that nihilism is wholly negative and necessarily damaging to the human spirit, John Marmysz offers a clear and complete definition to argue that it is compatible, and indeed preferably responded to, with an attitude of good humor. He carefully scrutinizes the phenomenon of nihilism as it appears in the works, lives, and actions of key figures in the history of philosophy, literature, politics, and theology, including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, and Mishima. While suggesting that there ultimately (...)
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  26. Berys Nigel Gaut (1998). Just Joking: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Humor. Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):51-68.
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  27.  8
    Elena Hoicka, Sarah Jutsum & Merideth Gattis (2008). Humor, Abstraction, and Disbelief. Cognitive Science 32 (6):985-1002.
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  28.  12
    Jennifer Marra (2015). Humor as a Symbolic Form: Cassirer and the Culture of Comedy. In Sebastian Luft & J. Tyler Friedman (eds.), The Philosophy of Ernst Cassirer: A Novel Assessment. De Gruyter 419-434.
  29.  17
    Glenn A. Hartz & Ralph Hunt (1991). Humor: The Beauty and the Beast. American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):299 - 309.
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  30.  48
    John Marmysz (2001). Humor, Sublimity and Incongruity. Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 2 (3).
    Humorous laughter is related to the sublime experience in that it involves the transformation of a potentially unpleasant perception into a pleasurable experience. However, whereas sublimity is associated with feelings of awe and respect, humorous laughter is associated with feelings of superiority and contempt. This difference is a result of the fact that sublimity is an affective response involving an individual’s perception of vulnerability while humorous laughter is a response involving perceived invulnerability.
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  31.  59
    Joseph Newirth (2006). Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious: Humor as a Fundamental Emotional Experience. Psychoanalytic Dialogues 16 (5):557-571.
  32.  26
    Cris Mayo (2010). Incongruity and Provisional Safety: Thinking Through Humor. Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (6):509-521.
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  33.  13
    Susanna Trnka (2011). Specters of Uncertainty: Violence, Humor, and the Uncanny in Indo‐Fijian Communities Following the May 2000 Fiji Coup. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (3):331-348.
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  34.  26
    J. Morreal (1983). Humor and Emotion. American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (July):297-304.
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  35. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). The Epistemic Function of Contempt and Humor in Nietzsche. In Michelle Mason (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Contempt. Rowman & Littlefield
  36. Manuel Ballester Hernández & Enrique Ujaldón (eds.) (2010). La Sonrisa Del Sabio: Ensayos Sobre Humor y Filosofía. Biblioteca Nueva.
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  37. Geert Brône (2010). Bedeutungskonstitution in Verbalem Humor: Ein Kognitiv-Linguistischer Und Diskurssemantischer Ansatz. Peter Lang.
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  38. Adir Cohen (2008). Soḳraṭes U-Ḳsanṭipah Be-Yeraḥ Devash: Mifgash ʻim Filosofyah Be-Darkhe Ha-Humor Ṿeha-Tseḥoḳ. Amatsyah.
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  39. Jorge Figueroa-Dorrego & Cristina Larkin-Galinanes (eds.) (2009). A Source Book of Literary and Philosophical Writings About Humour and Laughter: The Seventy-Five Essential Texts From Antiquity to Modern Times. The Edwin Mellen Press.
     
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  40. F. R. Fleet (1890). A Theory of Wit and Humour. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.
     
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  41. Julius Gordon (1950). Your Sense of Humor. New York, Didier.
     
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  42. Anthony Ashley Cooper Shaftesbury (1988). An Old-Spelling, Critical Edition of Shaftesbury's Letter Concerning Enthusiasm, and, Sensus Communis: An Essay on the Freedom of Wit and Humor. Garland.
  43. Aaron Smuts (2010). The Ethics of Humor: Can Your Sense of Humor Be Wrong? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (3):333-347.
    I distill three somewhat interrelated approaches to the ethical criticism of humor: (1) attitude-based theories, (2) merited-response theories, and (3) emotional responsibility theories. I direct the brunt of my effort at showing the limitations of the attitudinal endorsement theory by presenting new criticisms of Ronald de Sousa’s position. Then, I turn to assess the strengths of the other two approaches, showing that that their major formulations implicitly require the problematic attitudinal endorsement theory. I argue for an effects-mediated responsibility theory (...)
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  44. Simon Critchley (2002). On Humour. Routledge.
    Does humour make us human, or do the cats and dogs laugh along with us? On Humour is a fascinating, beautifully written and funny book on what humour can tell us about being human. Simon Critchley skilfully probes some of the most perennial but least understood aspects of humour, such as our tendency to laugh at animals and our bodies, why we mock death with comedy and why we think it's funny when people act like machines. He also looks at (...)
     
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  45.  76
    Luvell Anderson (2015). Racist Humor. Philosophy Compass 10 (8):501-509.
    In this brief essay, I will lay out the philosophical landscape concerning theories of racist humor. First, I mention some preliminary issues that bear on the question of what makes a joke racist. Next, I briefly survey some of the views philosophers have offered on racist humor, and on a view of sexist humor that is relevant for this discussion. I then suggest the debates could benefit from moving beyond the racist/non-racist binary most views presuppose. Finally, I (...)
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  46.  10
    Mordechai Gordon (2010). Learning to Laugh at Ourselves: Humor, Self-Transcendence, and the Cultivation of Moral Virtues. Educational Theory 60 (6):735-749.
    In this essay Mordechai Gordon begins to address the neglect of humor among philosophers of education by focusing on some interesting connections between humor, self‐transcendence, and the development of moral virtues. More specifically, he explores the kind of humor that makes fun of oneself and how it can affect educational encounters. Gordon begins his analysis by discussing the nature and purpose of humor in general, while distinguishing it from laughter and amusement. In the next part of (...)
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  47.  75
    John Lippitt (2000). Humour and Irony in Kierkegaard's Thought. St. Martin's Press.
    Irony, humor and the comic play vital yet under-appreciated roles in Kierkegaard's thought. Focusing upon the Concluding Unscientific Postscript , this book investigates these roles, relating irony and humor as forms of the comic to central Kierkegaardian themes. How does the comic function as a form of "indirect communication"? What roles can irony and humor play in the infamous Kierkegaardian "leap"? Do certain forms of wisdom depend upon possessing a sense of humor? And is such a (...)
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  48. Joshua Shaw (2010). Philosophy of Humor. Philosophy Compass 5 (2):112-126.
    Humor is a surprisingly understudied topic in philosophy. However, there has been a flurry of interest in the subject over the past few decades. This article outlines the major theories of humor. It argues for the need for more publications on humor by philosophers. More specifically, it suggests that humor may not be a well-understood phenomenon by questioning a widespread consensus in recent publications – namely, that humor can be detached from laughter. It is argued (...)
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  49.  36
    Noël Carroll (2014). Humour: A Very Short Introduction. OUP Oxford.
    Humour is a universal feature of human life. In this Very Short Introduction Noel Carroll considers the nature and value of humour, from its leading theories and its relation to emotion and cognition, to ethical questions of its morality and its significance in shaping society.
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  50. Brian Boyd (2004). Laughter and Literature: A Play Theory of Humor. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):1-22.
    : Humor seems uniquely human, but it has deep biological roots. Laughter, the best evidence suggests, derives from the ritualized breathing and open-mouth display common in animal play. Play evolved as training for the unexpected, in creatures putting themselves at risk of losing balance or dominance so that they learn to recover. Humor in turn involves play with the expectations we share-whether innate or acquired-in order to catch one another off guard in ways that simulate risk and stimulate (...)
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