Search results for 'Humphrey Primatt' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aaron Garrett, Richard Dean, Humphrey Primatt, John Oswald & Thomas Young (eds.) (1713/2000). Animal Rights and Souls in the Eighteenth Century. Thoemmes Press.score: 300.0
    The publication of 'Animal Rights and Souls in the 18th Century' will be welcomed by everyone interested in the development of the modern animal liberation movement, as well as by those who simply want to savour the work of enlightenment thinkers pushing back the boundaries of both science and ethics. At last these long out-of-print texts are again available to be read and enjoyed - and what texts they are! Gems like Bougeant's witty reductio of the Christian view of animals (...)
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  2. Diane Humphrey (2007). Chapter Fifteen Pictures in the Mind: Symmetry and Projections in Drawings Diane Humphrey and Dorothy Washburn. In L. I͡A Dorfman, Colin Martindale & Vladimir Petrov (eds.), Aesthetics and Innovation. Cambridge Scholars Pub.. 273.score: 180.0
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  3. N. Humphrey (2000). Discussion of Nicholas Humphrey's Theory-In Reply. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):98-112.score: 180.0
     
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  4. Nicholas Humphrey (2000). In Reply [Reply to Commentaries on "How to Solve the Mind-Body Problem"]. Humphrey, Nicholas (2000) in Reply [Reply to Commentaries on "How to Solve the Mind-Body Problem"]. [Journal (Paginated)] 7 (4):98-112.score: 60.0
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  5. Nicholas Humphrey (2001). Doing It My Way: Sensation, Perception – and Feeling Red. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):987-987.score: 60.0
    The theory presented here is a near neighbour of Humphrey's theory of sensations as actions. O'Regan & Noë have opened up remarkable new possibilities. But they have missed a trick by not making more of the distinction between sensation and perception; and some of their particular proposals for how we use our eyes to represent visual properties are not only implausible but would, if true, isolate vision from other sensory modalities and do little to explain the phenomenology of conscious (...)
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  6. N. Humphrey (1992/1999). A History of the Mind: Evolution and the Birth of Consciousness. Simon and Schuster.score: 60.0
    This book is a tour-de-force on how human consciousness may have evolved. From the "phantom pain" experienced by people who have lost their limbs to the uncanny faculty of "blindsight," Humphrey argues that raw sensations are central to all conscious states and that consciousness must have evolved, just like all other mental faculties, over time from our ancestorsodily responses to pain and pleasure. '.
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  7. Nicholas Humphrey, Seeing Red: A Postscript.score: 60.0
    One day someone will write a book that explains consciousness. The book will put forward a theory that closes the “explanatory gap” between conscious experience and brain activity, by showing how a brain state could in principle amount to a state of consciousness. But it will do more. It will demonstrate just why this particular brain state has to be this particular experience. As Dan Lloyd puts it in his philosophical novel, Radiant Cool: “What we need is a transparent theory. (...)
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  8. N. Humphrey (2003). The Mind Made Flesh: Essays From the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Nicholas Humphrey's writings about the evolution of the mind have done much to set the agenda for contemporary psychology.
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  9. Steven J. Humphrey (1999). Probability Learning, Event-Splitting Effects and the Economic Theory of Choice. Theory and Decision 46 (1):51-78.score: 60.0
    This paper reports an experiment which investigates a possible cognitive antecedent of event-splitting effects (ESEs) experimentally observed by Starmer and Sugden (1993) and Humphrey (1995) – the learning of absolute frequency of event category impacting on the learning of probability of event category – and reveals some evidence that it is responsible for observed ESEs. It is also suggested and empirically substantiated that stripped-down prospect theory will accurately predict ESEs in some decision making tasks, but will not perform well (...)
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  10. Nicholas Humphrey (2000). How to Solve the Mind-Body Problem. Journal Of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):5-20.score: 30.0
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  11. Nicholas Humphrey & Daniel C. Dennett (1989). Speaking for Our Selves: An Assessment of Multiple Personality Disorder. .score: 30.0
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  12. J. F. Humphrey (2009). “There is Good Hope That Death is a Blessing”. In Dennis Cooley & Lloyd Steffen (eds.), Innovative Dialogue. Probing the Boundaries: Re-Imagining Death and Dying. Interdisciplinary Press.score: 30.0
    In Plato’s Apology (29a-b), Socrates agues that he does not fear death; indeed, to fear death is a sign of ignorance. It is to claim to know what one in fact does not know (Ap. 29 a-b). Perhaps, Socrates suggests, death is not a great evil after all, but “the greatest of all goods.” At the end of the dialogue, after the judges have voted on the final verdict and Socrates has received the death penalty, the philosopher considers two common (...)
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  13. Nicholas Humphrey (2006). Consciousness: The Achilles Heel of Darwinism? Thank God, Not Quite. In John Brockman (ed.), Intelligent Thought: Science Versus the Intelligent Design Movement. Vintage.score: 30.0
    William Paley in his famous statement in 1800 of the Argument from Design, imagined that he found a watch lying on a heath and set to wondering how it came to be there. “The inference is inevitable, that the watch must have had a maker: that there must have existed, at some time, and at some place or other, an artificer or artificers who formed it for the purpose which.
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  14. N. Humphrey & Daniel C. Dennett (1989). Speaking for Ourselves. Raritan 9:68-98.score: 30.0
    _Raritan: A Quarterly Review_ , IX, 68-98, Summer 1989. Reprinted (with footnotes), _Occasional Paper #8_ , Center on Violence and Human Survival, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The City University of New York, 1991; Daniel Kolak and R. Martin, eds., _Self & Identity: Contemporary Philosophical Issues_ , Macmillan, 1991.
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  15. John Humphrey, Some Oddities in Kripke's Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language.score: 30.0
    Oddity One : Kripke claims that Wittgenstein has invented "a new form of scepticism", one which inclines Kripke "to regard it as the most radical and original sceptical problem that philosophy has seen to date, one that only a highly unusual cast of mind could have produced" (K, p. 60). However, Kripke also claims that there are analogies (and sometimes the analogies look very much like identities) between Wittgenstein's sceptical argument and the work of at least three and maybe four (...)
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  16. N. Humphrey (2000). One Self: A Meditation on the Unity of Consciousness. Social Research 67 (4):1059-1066.score: 30.0
    What unites the many selves that constitute the human mind? How is the self-binding problem solved? I argue that separate selves come to belong together as one Self as a result of their dynamic participation in creating a single life, rather as the members of an orchestra come to belong together as a result of their jointly creating a single work of music.
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  17. Nicholas Humphrey, The Uses of Consciousness.score: 30.0
    Reflexive consciousness evolved in the context of early human social life, as a means by which 'natural psychologists' could develop working models of their own and others' minds.
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  18. Nicholas Humphrey (1974). Vision in a Monkey Without Striate Cortex: A Case Study. Perception 3 (3):241-55.score: 30.0
    Abstract. A rhesus monkey, Helen, from whom the striate cortex was almost totally removed, was studied intensively over a period of 8 years. During this time she regained an effective, though limited, degree of visually guided behaviour. The evidence suggests that while Helen suffered a permanent loss of `focal vision she retained (initially unexpressed) the capacity for `ambient vision.
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  19. Nicholas Humphrey (2002). Thinking About Feeling. In G. Richard (ed.), [Book Chapter]. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  20. Nicholas Humphrey (2007). The Society of Selves. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 362 (1480):745-754.score: 30.0
    Human beings are not only the most sociable animals on Earth, but also the only animals that have to ponder the separateness that comes with having a conscious self. The philosophical problem of ‘other minds’ nags away at people’s sense of who—and why—they are. But the privacy of consciousness has an evolutionary history—and maybe even an evolutionary function. While recognizing the importance to humans of mind-reading and psychic transparency, we should consider the consequences and possible benefits of being—ultimately—psychically opaque.
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  21. Ingerid S. Straume & J. F. Humphrey (eds.) (2011). Depoliticization. The Political Imaginary of Global Capitalism. NSU Press.score: 30.0
    Depoliticization: The Political Imaginary of Global Capitalism follows in the path blazed by Hannah Arendt and Cornelius Castoriadis, where politics is seen as a mode of freedom; the possibility for individuals to consciously and explicitly create the institutions of their own societies. Starting with such problem as: What is capital? How can we characterize the dominant economic system? What are the conditions for its existence, and how can we create alternatives?, the articles examine the central institutions of modern Western societies, (...)
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  22. John Humphrey, With Factualist Friends, Kripke's Wittgenstein Needs No Enemies: On Byrne's Case for Kripke's Wittgenstein Being a Factualist About Meaning Attributions.score: 30.0
    _Private Language_ is that it almost universally sees KW as offering, in his sceptical solution, an account of meaning attributions (i.e., statements of the form, "X means such-and-so by 's'"; hereafter, MAs) which takes their legitimate attribution to be a function of something other than facts or truth conditions. KW is almost universally read as having rejected any account of meaning attributions which takes them to be stating facts or corresponding to facts. In a word, KW is understood as offering (...)
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  23. Nicholas Humphrey, Consciousness: A Just-so Story.score: 30.0
  24. John A. Humphrey (1996). Kripke's Wittgenstein and the Impossibility of Private Language: The Same Old Story? Journal of Philosophical Research 21 (January):197-207.score: 30.0
    A common complaint against Kripke’s Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language is that whereas the aim of “the real” Wittgenstein’s private language argument is to establish the impossibility of a necessarily private language, the communitarian account of meaning proposed by Kripke’s Wittgenstein (KW), if successful, would establish the impossibility of a contingently private language. I show that this common complaint is based on a failure of Kripke’s critics (a failure that is justified, in part, by Kripke’s text) to recognize and (...)
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  25. J. F. Humphrey (2010). Business Ethics. In Richard H. Corrigan & Mary E. Farrell (eds.), Ethics: A University Guide. Progressive Frontier Press.score: 30.0
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  26. Nicholas Humphrey, One Self: A Meditation on the Unity of Consciousness. Social Research, 67, No. 4, 32-39, 2000.score: 30.0
    I am looking at my baby son, as he thrashes around in his crib, two arms flailing, hands grasping randomly, legs kicking the air, head and eyes turning this way and that, a smile followed by a grimace crossing his face. . . And I’m wondering: what is it like to be him? What is he feeling now? What kind of experience is he having of himself?
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  27. J. F. Humphrey (2010). Reflections on the Economic Crisis. The Transcendental Character of Money: An Exposition of Karl Marx’s Argument in the Grundrisse. Nordicum-Mediterraneum, Vol. 5, No. 1 (March 2010) 5 (1).score: 30.0
    An exposition of Karl Marx’s argument in the Grundrisse for the logical development of money, this essay is divided into three parts. Since Marx is concerned to distinguish himself and his method from that of the seventeenth century political economists, I begin my paper with a brief reflection on “the scientifically correct method” or the “theoretical method” (Grundrisse 101 and 102). The second part of this paper considers how Marx justifies beginning his reflection with the concept of production in general. (...)
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  28. Nicholas Humphrey (2000). The Privatization of Sensation. In Celia Heyes & Ludwig Huber (eds.), The Evolution of Cognition. Mit Press. 241--252.score: 30.0
    It is the ambition of evolutionary psychology to explain how the basic features of human mental life came to be selected because of their contribution to biological survival. Counted among the most basic must be the subjective qualities of conscious sensory experience: the felt redness we experience on looking at a ripe tomato, the felt saltiness on tasting an anchovy, the felt pain on being pricked by a thorn. But, as many theorists acknowledge, with these qualia, the ambition of evolutionary (...)
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  29. Mathew Humphrey (2009). Mapping the Moral Future: Environmental Problems and What We Owe to Future Generations. Res Publica 15 (1):85-95.score: 30.0
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  30. Nicholas Humphrey, Placebo Effect.score: 30.0
    When people are unwell, they will often begin to recover just as soon as they receive medical attention., but before the treatment could have any direct effect and even when the treatment is a sham. Mere belief that recovery is coming can by itself bring the recovery about.
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  31. Ted Humphrey (1981). Schopenhauer and the Cartesian Tradition. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):191-212.score: 30.0
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  32. Nicholas Humphrey (2000). Dreaming as Play. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):953-953.score: 30.0
    Dreaming can provide a marvelous opportunity for the “playful” exploration of dramatic events. But the chance to learn to deal with danger is only a small part of it. More important is the chance to discover what it is like to be the subject of strange but humanly significant mental states. [Revonsuo].
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  33. Nicholas Humphrey, Great Expectations: The Evolutionary Psychology of Faith- Healing and the Placebo Effect.score: 30.0
    I said that the cure itself is a certain leaf, but in addition to the drug there is a certain charm, which if someone chants when he makes use of it, the medicine altogether restores him to health, but without the charm there is no profit from the leaf.
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  34. Nicholas Humphrey (1999). Cave Art, Autism, and the Evolution of the Human Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.score: 30.0
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  35. Karen L. Benson, Timothy J. Brailsford & Jacquelyn E. Humphrey (2006). Do Socially Responsible Fund Managers Really Invest Differently? Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):337 - 357.score: 30.0
    To date, research into socially responsible investment (SRI), and in particular the socially responsible investment funds industry, has focused on whether investing in SRI assets has any differential impact on investor returns. Prior findings generally suggest that, on a risk-adjusted basis, there is no difference in performance between SRI and conventional funds. This result has led to questions about whether SRI funds are really any different from conventional funds. This paper examines whether the portfolio allocation across industry sectors and the (...)
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  36. Mathew Humphrey (2007). Ecological Politics and Democratic Theory: The Challenge to the Deliberative Ideal. Routledge.score: 30.0
    This book examines the relationship between environmental and democratic thought and the apparent compatibility of ecology and democracy. Although environmental politics is quite rightly seen as a progressive force, it has also featured a strand of extreme right "eco-authoritarianism" and its proponents have sometimes developed controversial positions on such issues as population policy. There have also been a number of situations where radical environmental activists have broken the laws of democratic societies in pursuit of ecological objectives and the book examines (...)
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  37. Nicholas Humphrey, Getting the Measure of Consciousness.score: 30.0
    The hard problem of consciousness is to explain the experience of qualia. But everything gets easier once we realise that what has to be explained is not how qualia can exist as objective entities but rather why the conscious subject should believe that they exist. This essay lays out a programme for doing this. It makes radical proposals as to how the “qualia illusion” is created, and why sustaining this illusion is biologically adaptive.
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  38. John A. Humphrey (1999). Quine, Kripke's Wittgenstein, Simplicity and Sceptical Solutions. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):43-55.score: 30.0
  39. G. K. Humphrey & Melvyn A. Goodale (1998). Probing Unconscious Visual Processing with the Mccollough Effect. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):494-519.score: 30.0
    The McCollough effect, an orientation-contingent color aftereffect, has been known for over 30 years and, like other aftereffects, has been taken as a means of probing the brain's operations psychophysically. In this paper, we review psychophysical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging studies of the McCollough effect. Much of the evidence suggests that the McCollough effect depends on neural mechanisms that are located early in the cortical visual pathways, probably in V1. We also review evidence showing that the aftereffect can be induced without (...)
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  40. Ted Humphrey (1973). The Historical and Conceptual Relations Between Kant's Metaphysics of Space and Philosophy of Geometry. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (4):483-512.score: 30.0
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  41. Nicholas Humphrey, Questioning Consciousness.score: 30.0
    No one doubts that our experience of phenomenal consciousness—the felt redness of fire, the felt sweetness of a peach, the felt pain of a bee sting—arises from the activity of our brains. Yet the problem of explaining how this can be so seems to many theorists to be staggeringly hard. How can the wine of consciousness, the weird, ineffable, immaterial qualia that give such richness to subjective experience, conceivably arise from the water of the brain? As the philosopher Colin McGinn (...)
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  42. Nicholas Humphrey, Commentary on Michael Winkelman, 'Shamanism and Cognitive Evolution'.score: 30.0
    ‘The shamanic context of cave art is attested by a number of features’, Michael Winkelman writes (p.6); and, scarcely pausing for breath, he proceeds to reel off as if they were matters of established fact a list of co njectures about the authorship and meaning of ice-age cave paintings. We are t o conclude, without question apparently, that ‘cave art images represent shamanic activities and altered states of consciousness, and the subterranean rock art sites were used for shamanic vision questing’ (...)
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  43. Peter Humphrey (1985). The Ethics of Earthworks. Environmental Ethics 7 (1):5-21.score: 30.0
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  44. Mathew Humphrey (2005). (De) Contesting Ideology: The Struggle Over the Meaning of the Struggle Over Meaning. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (2):225-246.score: 30.0
    In this essay I seek to re?examine the ?what is ideology?? question in the light of recent developments in ideology theory. We see that contemporary ideology theory tends to employ either a ?restrictive? or an ?inclusive? conception of ideology. Most theorists operating in the field of ideology study see these two approaches as both rival and exclusive. Furthermore the relationship between the analyst of ideology and the ideological field is at issue in both cases. I argue that the concept/conception distinction (...)
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  45. Nicholas K. Humphrey (1980). Nature's Psychologists. In Brian Josephson & Vilayanur S. Ramachandran (eds.), [Book Chapter]. Pergamon Press. 57--80.score: 30.0
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  46. John Humphrey, Brief Overview of Key Parts and Key Notions in Kripke's Book.score: 30.0
    The alleged paradox begins with a sceptical inquiry about my right to claim that my past usage of '+' (i.e., my past usage of the plus sign) was used to denote the function plus rather than the function quus. The definition of quus is: x quus y = x + y, if x, y < 57; otherwise, x quus y = 5. (Kripke uses an encircled plus sign to represent the quus sign. I can't reproduce that sign here so I'll (...)
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  47. Nicholas Humphrey (2006). Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness. Belknap Press.score: 30.0
    The purpose of this book is to build towards an explanation of just what the matter is.
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  48. John Humphrey, The Will to Believe.score: 30.0
    IN the recently published Life by I.eslie Stephen of his brother, Fitz-James, there is an account of a school to which the latter went when he was a boy. The teacher, a certain Mr. Guest, used to converse with his pupils in this wise: "Gurney, what is the difference between justification and sanctification?- Stephen, prove the omnipotence of God " etc. In the midst of our Harvard freethinking and indifference we are prone to imagine that here at your good old (...)
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  49. Nicholas Humphrey (1997). Varieties of Altruism - and the Common Ground Between Them. Social Research.score: 30.0
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  50. Nicholas Humphrey (2002). Shamanism and Cognitive Evolution [Commentary on Michael Winkelman]. .score: 30.0
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