Search results for 'Hunk Bats' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Melanie S. Thomson (2007). Placing the Wild in the City: "Thinking with" Melbourne's Bats. Society and Animals 15 (1):79-95.
    This paper uses academic and lay discourses to examine the ways in which "the city" is constructed in its relationship to "wildlife." The paper examines the negative and essentialized ways in which the city's relationship to wildlife has been represented in postcolonial theory and animal geography. The paper further explores these theoretical framings of the city in the empirical context of the relocation of an urban, flying fox colony, which provides opportunities to reconsider these bounded conceptualizations of the city.
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  2. Christopher S. Hill (1977). Of Bats, Brains, and Minds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (September):100-106.
  3.  98
    Derk Pereboom (1994). Bats, Brain Scientists, and the Limitations of Introspection. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):315-29.
  4.  4
    Gordon Bearn (2015). Bats? Again? William James, Consciousness, and Our Insipid Existence. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (4):522.
    Queerly enough, the introduction of this new phraseology [of sense-data] has deluded people into thinking that they had discovered new entities, new elements of the structure of the world, as though to say, “I believe that there are sense data” were similar to saying “I believe that matter consists of electrons.”There was no premeditation. Frustrated at the way our seminar had let the excitement of consciousness fade into professional model building, I took it once again, from the top, asking simply: (...)
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  5.  7
    Henry Simoni-Wastila (2000). Particularity and Consciousness: Wittgenstein and Nagel on Privacy, Beetles and Bats. Philosophy Today 44 (4):415-425.
  6.  19
    Patricia Hanna (1990). Must Thinking Bats Be Conscious? Philosophical Investigations 13 (October):350-55.
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  7.  8
    Igor Popov (2005). An Enigma for Evolutionary Theory. The Origin of Bats. Ludus Vitalis 13 (23):4-19.
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  8.  2
    Bruno Karsenti (2014). « Si je me bats seulement pour moi, que suis-je? » Leo Strauss et l'élection des juifs. Les Etudes Philosophiques 111 (4):547.
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  9.  13
    John F. Kavanaugh (1998). What Is It Like to Be Bats or Brains? Modern Schoolman 76 (1):73-79.
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  10.  2
    Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1994). Humans Did Not Evolve From Bats. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):183.
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  11.  4
    Henry Sinnoni-Wastila (2000). Particularity and Consciousness: Wittgenstein and Nagel on Privacy, Beetles, and Bats. Philosophy Today 44 (4):415-425.
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  12.  2
    Alain Montañez & Roberto Martínez Gallardo (2013). La Naturaleza Como Víctima de la Conquista Española Caso: Los Murciélagos/Nature as a Victim of the Spanish Conquest: Bats. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 15 (2):153-164.
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  13.  5
    Jagmeet S. Kanwal (1998). Charting Speech with Bats Without Requiring Maps. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):272-273.
    The effort to understand speech perception on the basis of relationships between acoustic parameters of speech sounds is to be recommended. Neural specializations (combination-sensitivity) for echolocation, communication, and sound localization probably constitute the common mechanisms of vertebrate auditory processing and may be essential for speech production as well as perception. There is, however, no need for meaningful maps.
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  14.  3
    K. V. Wilkes (1997). Talking to Cats, Rats and Bats. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 42:177-.
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  15. Harald Brüssow (2012). On Viruses, Bats and Men: A Natural History of Food-Borne Viral Infections. In Witzany (ed.), Viruses: Essential Agents of Life. Springer 245--267.
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  16. Sven Dijkgraaf (1960). Spallanzani's Unpublished Experiments on the Sensory Basis of Object Perception in Bats. Isis 51 (1):9-20.
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  17. Robert Galambos (1942). The Avoidance of Obstacles by Flying Bats: Spallanzani's Ideas and Later Theories. Isis 34 (2):132-140.
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  18. R. F. Lawrence (1959). New Mite Parasites From South African Lizards and Bats. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 35 (5):569-576.
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  19. H. Otto Sibum (2008). Machines, Bats, and Scholars: Experimental Knowledge in the Late Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. In Jan Lazardzig, Ludger Schwarte & Helmar Schramm (eds.), Theatrum Scientiarum - English Edition, Volume 2, Instruments in Art and Science: On the Architectonics of Cultural Boundaries in the 17th Century. De Gruyter 280-295.
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  20. Sean Allen-Hermanson (2015). Strong Neurophilosophy and the Matter of Bat Consciousness: A Case Study. Erkenntnis 80 (1):57-76.
    In “What is it like to be boring and myopic?” Kathleen Akins offers an interesting, empirically driven, argument for thinking that there is nothing that it is like to be a bat. She suggests that bats are “boring” in the sense that they are governed by behavioral scripts and simple, non-representational, control loops, and are best characterized as biological automatons. Her approach has been well received by philosophers sympathetic to empirically informed philosophy of mind. But, despite its influence, her (...)
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  21.  63
    Einar Duenger Bohn (forthcoming). Indefinitely Descending Ground. In Ricki Bliss & Graham Priest (eds.), Reality and its Structure. Oxford University Press
    In this paper I argue against grounding being necessarily well-founded, and provide some reasons to think it's actually not well-founded.
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  22. Mahrad Almotahari (2014). The Identity of a Material Thing and its Matter. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (256):387-406.
    I have both a smaller and a larger aim. The smaller aim is polemical. Kit Fine believes that a material thing—a Romanesque statue, for example, or an open door—can be distinguished from its constituent matter—a piece of alloy, say, or a hunk of plastic—without recourse to modal or temporal considerations. The statue is Romanesque; the piece of alloy is not Romanesque. The door is open; the hunk of plastic is not open. I argue that these considerations, when combined (...)
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  23.  91
    Gregg H. Rosenberg (2004). A Place for Consciousness: Probing the Deep Structure of the Natural World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    What place does consciousness have in the natural world? If we reject materialism, could there be a credible alternative? In one classic example, philosophers ask whether we can ever know what is it is like for bats to sense the world using sonar. It seems obvious to many that any amount of information about a bat's physical structure and information processing leaves us guessing about the central questions concerning the character of its experience. A Place for Consciousness begins with (...)
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  24.  2
    S. A. Gelman & T. Tardif (1998). A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of Generic Noun Phrases in English and Mandarin. Cognition 66 (3):215-248.
    Generic noun phrases (e.g. 'bats live in caves') provide a window onto human concepts. They refer to categories as 'kinds rather than as sets of individuals. Although kind concepts are often assumed to be universal, generic expression varies considerably across languages. For example, marking of generics is less obligatory and overt in Mandarin than in English. How do universal conceptual biases interact with language-specific differences in how generics are conveyed? In three studies, we examined adults' generics in English and (...)
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  25. Murat Aydede (2000). Emotions or Emotional Feelings? (Commentary on Rolls' The Brain and Emotion). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):192-194.
    It turns out that Rolls’s answer to Nagel’s (1974) question, "What is it like to be a bat?" is brusque: there is nothing it is like to be a bat . . . provided that bats don’t have a linguistically structured internal representational system that enables them to think about their first-order thoughts which are also linguistically structured. For phenomenal consciousness, a properly functioning system of higher-order linguistic thought (HOLT) is necessary (Rolls 1998, p. 262). By this criterion, not (...)
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  26.  71
    Dan Sperber, Does the Selection Task Detect Cheater-Detection?
    Evolutionary psychology—in its ambitious version well formulated by Cosmides and Tooby (e.g., Cosmides & Tooby 1987, Tooby & Cosmides 1992) —will succeed to the extent that it causes cognitive psychologists to rethink central aspects of human cognition in an evolutionary perspective, to the extent, that is, that psychology in general becomes evolutionary. The human species is exceptional by its massive investment in cognition, and in forms of cognitive activity—language, metarepresentation, abstract thinking—that are as unique to humans as echolocation is unique (...)
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  27. E. Diaz-Leon (2009). How Many Explanatory Gaps Are There? APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Computers 8 (2):33-35.
    According to many philosophers, there is an explanatory gap between physical truths and phenomenal truths. Someone could know all the physical truths about the world, and in particular, all the physical information about the brain and the neurophysiology of vision, and still not know what it is like to see red (Jackson 1982, 1986). According to a similar example, someone could know all the physical truths about bats and still not know what it is like to be a bat (...)
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  28. Steven Connor (2011). A Philosophy of Sport. Reaktion Books.
    While previous writing on the philosophy of sport has tended to see sport as a kind of testing ground for philosophical theories devised to deal with other kinds of problems—of ethics, aesthetics, or logical categorization—here Steven Connor offers a new philosophical understanding of sport in its own terms. In order to define what sport essentially is and means, Connor presents a complete grammar of sport, isolating and describing its essential elements, including the characteristic spaces of sport, the nature of sporting (...)
     
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  29.  45
    Ken Binmore, The Origins of Fair Play (Pdf 209k).
    My answer to the question why? is relatively uncontroversial among anthropologists. Sharing food makes good evolutionary sense, because animals who share food thereby insure themselves against hunger. It is for this reason that sharing food is thought to be so common in the natural world. The vampire bat is a particularly exotic example of a food-sharing species. The bats roost in caves in large numbers during the day. At night, they forage for prey, from whom they suck blood if (...)
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  30.  70
    Austen Clark, How to Respond to Philosophers on Raw Feels.
    I address this talk to anyone who believes in the possibility of an informative empirical science about sensory qualities. Potentially this is a large audience. By "sensory quality" I mean those qualities manifest in various sensory experiences: color, taste, smell, touch, pain, and so on. We should include sensory modalities humans do not share, such as electro-reception in fish, echolocation in bats, or the skylight compass in birds. Those pursuing empirical science about this large domain might pursue it in (...)
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  31.  27
    Stefano Gualeni (2014). Augmented Ontologies or How to Philosophize with a Digital Hammer. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):177-199.
    Could a person ever transcend what it is like to be in the world as a human being? Could we ever know what it is like to be other creatures? Questions about the overcoming of a human perspective are not uncommon in the history of philosophy. In the last century, those very interrogatives were notably raised by American philosopher Thomas Nagel in the context of philosophy of mind. In his 1974 essay What is it Like to Be a Bat?, Nagel (...)
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  32.  66
    Kirk A. Ludwig (1996). Shape Properties and Perception. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Philosophical Issues. Atascadero: Ridgeview 325-350.
    We can perceive shapes visually and tactilely, and the information we gain about shapes through both sensory modalities is integrated smoothly into and functions in the same way in our behavior independently of whether we gain it by sight or touch. There seems to be no reason in principle we couldn't perceive shapes through other sensory modalities as well, although as a matter of fact we do not. While we can identify shapes through other sensory modalities—e.g., I may know by (...)
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  33.  13
    Tam Hunt (2011). Kicking the Psychophysical Laws Into Gear A New Approach to the Combination Problem. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (11-12):11-12.
    A new approach to the 'hard problem'of consciousness, the eons-old mind-body problem, is proposed, inspired by Whitehead, Schopenhauer, Griffin, and others. I define a 'simple subject' as the fundamental unit of matter and of consciousness. Simple subjects are inherently experiential, albeit in a highly rudimentary manner compared to human consciousness. With this re-framing, the 'physical' realm includes the 'mental' realm; they are two aspects of the same thing, the outside and inside of each real thing. This view is known as (...)
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  34.  35
    Jerrold Levinson (1988). A Note on Categorical Properties and Contingent Identity. Journal of Philosophy 85 (12):718-722.
    Stephen Yablo has attempted recently to revive the notion of contingent identity, identifying this with a relation of L coincidence between objects that are "distinct by nature but the same in the circumstances" (296). Yablo argues convincingly for the need of essentialist metaphysics to recognize some relation of this sort, a relation of "intimate identity-like connections between things" (296) if it is to acknowledge properly the intuitive difference between (i) the nonidentity of a bust B and a hunk of (...)
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  35.  10
    B. J. Garrett (1988). Best-Candidate Theories and Identity: Reply to Brennan. Inquiry 31 (1):79 – 85.
    This note criticizes Andrew Brennan's attempt to defend best?candidate theories of the identity of artefacts over time against certain now familiar objections. Adoption of a mereological conception of individuals does not, in itself, provide the means for a satisfactory response to objections of Wiggins and Noonan (some of which are anyway ill?focused). The way forward consists in recognizing that the consequences of best?candidate theories which have been thought objectionable (in particular, commitment to the extrinsicness of identity) do not violate the (...)
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  36. Jay David Atlas, 16-17 April 2005.
    The lecture that we have heard consists of excerpts from Professor Stanley’s forthcoming book Knowledge and Interest, and it consists of two parts, a messy part and a clean part; the messy part is from the book’s introduction, which describes the “central data that is at issue in this debate,” and the clean part is from Chapter 7, which presents an interesting criticism of a semantical theory of knowledge-attribution sentences that makes their truth-conditions relative to non-time-world circumstances of evaluation, e.g. (...)
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  37.  21
    Steinar Bøyum (2008). Words From Nowhere – Limits of Criticism. Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):161–181.
    In the present essay, I aim to accentuate an analogy between the patterns of thought articulated by Berkeley's Hylas and those of Nagel in his philosophy of bats and aliens. The comparison has a critical purpose, with Philonous playing a role similar to that of Wittgenstein. I argue that Nagel's central claim comes down to statements that are marked by a peculiar form of emptiness. Towards the end, though, I will concede that this kind of Wittgensteinian criticism runs up (...)
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  38.  8
    E. E. Leppik (1968). Directional Trend of Floral Evolution. Acta Biotheoretica 18 (1-4):87-102.
    A directional trend of floral evolution, due to the selective activity of pollinating insects, birds and bats, is here described and discussed. Six clearly distinguishable levels in the evolution of flower types are correlated with six corresponding stages of sensory development of pollinating insects . This sequence of floral evolution was used for classification of present-day flower types , and for identification of flower imprints in fossilized clays, muds, and fine sands. It was also used as a practical yardstick (...)
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  39.  4
    John Fisher (1984). Entitling. Critical Inquiry 11 (2):286-298.
    For the moment, I assume that we have some rough idea of what “title” is supposed to mean: the large letters on the spine of a book, the words on the center of the first page of a musical score, or the little plate on the museum wall to the right of the painting . Thus examples of titles would be The Taming of the Shrew, “Mapleleaf Rag,” or The Birth of Venus, but that generates a rather complex set of (...)
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  40.  5
    Henry James, Review (1877) of Gustave de MolinariÂ's Letters on the United States and Canada (1876).
    Débats, addressed last summer to that sheet a series of letters descriptive of a rapid tour through the United States. He has just gathered these letters into a volume in which American readers will find a good deal of entertainment and a certain amount of instruction. M. de Molinari, in his capacity of French journalist, is of course lively and witty; but his vivacity is always in excellent taste. He is moreover extremely observant, and he often renders his impressions (...)
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  41.  1
    Chiara Cremonesi (2005). Il corpo mitico dell’eroe. Eroi e santi nella rappresentazione di un cristiano d’Oriente. Kernos 18:407-420.
    Le corps mythique du héros.Les dieux et les héros grecs sont refoulés dans les ténèbres comme des chauve-souris, Jésus est la lumière victorieuse : ce sont les mots de Théodoret dans sa Graecarum affectionum curatio, l’un des plus précieux témoignages de l’apologétique chrétienne. Dans cette œuvre, l’évêque de Cyr parle aux païens de leurs héros et en particulier de l’iniquité du culte héroïque : cette représentation ne s’explique pas seulement par les topoi de la rhétorique chrétienne, mais aussi par rapport (...)
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  42.  1
    Carmen Sorge (2008). The Relationship Between Bonding with Nonhuman Animals and Students' Attitudes Toward Science. Society and Animals 16 (2):171-184.
    This paper examines the relationship of bonding with nonhuman animals during an interactive, animal-in-the-wild science program and the science attitudes of 358 young children between the ages of 8 and 14 Talking Talons utilizes typically wild animals such as raptors, reptiles, and bats in a school-based educational science curriculum. Qualitative data from interviews with students in the program indicated that "bonding with animals" and the educators within the program were related to increased positive attitudes toward science. The program used (...)
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  43. Richard Dawkins, Why Don't Animals Have Wheels?
    Whenever humans have a good idea, zoologists have grown accustomed to finding it anticipated in the animal kingdom.. Why not the wheel? Bats and dolphins perfected sophisticated echo-ranging systems millions of years before human engineers gave us sonar and..
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  44. Roberto Bui (2001). Lettre sur les Tute Bianche. Multitudes 4 (4):33-37.
    Tute Bianche are not a movement but a device of subjectivation working inside vaster movements. Each is free to put or to remove Tute Bianca. It indicates that he respects the style of it: the refusal of the separation violence/nonviolence, reference to t zapatisme, the relationship of a particular type with the media. Tute Bianche are auto-sarcastic, ironic, rich in invention. In search of a hegemony of minority cultures, they put in crisis representations, destabilize media, etc. But if since Seattle (...)
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  45. Bärbel Herrnberger & Günter Ehret (1998). Linearity or Separability? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):269-270.
    Sussman et al. state that auditory systems exploit linear correlations in the sound signal in order to identify perceptual categories. Can the auditory system recognize linearity? In bats and owls, separability of emergent features is an additional constraint that goes beyond linearity and for which linearity is not a necessary prerequisite.
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  46. Keith R. Kluender (1998). Locus Equations Reveal Learnability. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):273-274.
    Although neural encoding by bats and owls presents seductive analogies, the major contribution of locus equations and orderly output constraints discussed by Sussman et al. is the demonstration that important acoustic information for speech perception can be captured by elegant and neurally-plausible learning processes.
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  47. Helen Vendler (1987). The Poems of Elizabeth Bishop. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):825-838.
    Bishop was both fully at home in, and fully estranged from, Nova Scotia and Brazil. In Nova Scotia, after Bishop’s father had died, her mother went insane; Bishop lived there with her grandparents from the age of three to the age of six. She then left to be raised by an aunt in Massachusetts, but spent summers in Nova Scotia till she was thirteen. Subsequent adult visits north produced poems like “Cape Breton,” “At the Fishhouses,” and “The Moose”; and Bishop (...)
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