Search results for 'Hunk Bats' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Derk Pereboom (1994). Bats, Brain Scientists, and the Limitations of Introspection. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):315-29.score: 15.0
  2. Christopher S. Hill (1977). Of Bats, Brains, and Minds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (September):100-106.score: 15.0
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  3. Patricia Hanna (1990). Must Thinking Bats Be Conscious? Philosophical Investigations 13 (October):350-55.score: 15.0
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  4. Jagmeet S. Kanwal (1998). Charting Speech with Bats Without Requiring Maps. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):272-273.score: 15.0
    The effort to understand speech perception on the basis of relationships between acoustic parameters of speech sounds is to be recommended. Neural specializations (combination-sensitivity) for echolocation, communication, and sound localization probably constitute the common mechanisms of vertebrate auditory processing and may be essential for speech production as well as perception. There is, however, no need for meaningful maps.
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  5. Lee A. Miller & Annemarie Surlykke (2001). How Some Insects Detect and Avoid Being Eaten by Bats: Tactics and Countertactics of Prey and Predator Evolutionarily Speaking, Insects Have Responded to Selective Pressure From Bats with New Evasive Mechanisms, and These Very Responses in Turn Put Pressure on Bats to “Improve” Their Tactics. BioScience 51 (7):570-581.score: 15.0
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  6. Wayne H. Davis (1984). Bat Ecology Ecology of Bats Thomas H. Kunz. BioScience 34 (3):189-189.score: 15.0
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  7. Gerald Kerth (2008). Causes and Consequences of Sociality in Bats. BioScience 58 (8):737-746.score: 15.0
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  8. Lee A. Miller & Annemarie Surlykke (2001). And Avoid Being Eaten by Bats: Tactics and Countertactics of Prey And. BioScience 51:7.score: 15.0
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  9. Lee A. Miller & Annemarie Surlykke (2001). How Some Insects Detect and Avoid Being Eaten by Bats: Tactics and Countertactics of Prey and Predator. BioScience 51 (7):570.score: 15.0
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  10. K. V. Wilkes (1997). Talking to Cats, Rats and Bats. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 42:177-.score: 15.0
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  11. Jeffrey P. Cohn (2012). Bats and White-Nose Syndrome Still a Conundrum. BioScience 62 (4):444-444.score: 15.0
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  12. Jeffrey P. Cohn (2008). White-Nose Syndrome Threatens Bats. BioScience 58 (11):1098.score: 15.0
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  13. Donald R. Griffin (2001). Return to the Magic Well: Echolocation Behavior of Bats and Responses of Insect Prey. BioScience 51 (7):555.score: 15.0
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  14. John F. Kavanaugh (1998). What Is It Like to Be Bats or Brains? Modern Schoolman 76 (1):73-79.score: 15.0
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  15. Tigga Kingston (2012). Bats. BioScience 62 (4):436-438.score: 15.0
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  16. C. A. Long (1971). Treatise on Bats Biology of Bats W. A. Wimsatt. BioScience 21 (15):835-835.score: 15.0
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  17. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1994). Humans Did Not Evolve From Bats. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):183.score: 15.0
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  18. Igor Popov (2005). An Enigma for Evolutionary Theory. The Origin of Bats. Ludus Vitalis 13 (23):4-19.score: 15.0
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  19. Melanie S. Thomson (2007). Placing the Wild in the City: "Thinking with" Melbourne's Bats. Society and Animals 15 (1):79-95.score: 15.0
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  20. William H. Allen (1996). The Varied Bats of Barro Colorado Island. BioScience 46 (9):639-642.score: 15.0
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  21. Harald Brüssow (2012). On Viruses, Bats and Men: A Natural History of Food-Borne Viral Infections. In Witzany (ed.), Viruses: Essential Agents of Life. Springer. 245--267.score: 15.0
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  22. A. M. Gillis & J. A. Miller (1994). Separate Menus for Birds and Bats. BioScience 44 (11):733.score: 15.0
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  23. A. la MillerSurlykke (forthcoming). How Some Insects Detect and Avoid Being Eaten by Bats. BioScience.score: 15.0
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  24. Gary F. McCracken (1997). All About Bats Ecology, Evolution and Behaviour of Bats Paul A. Racey Susan M. Swift. BioScience 47 (3):188-191.score: 15.0
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  25. Gary F. McCracken (1997). All About Bats. BioScience 47 (3):188-191.score: 15.0
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  26. Alain Montañez & Roberto Martínez Gallardo (2013). La Naturaleza Como Víctima de la Conquista Española Caso: Los Murciélagos/Nature as a Victim of the Spanish Conquest: Bats. Telos 15 (2):153-164.score: 15.0
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  27. Douglas W. Morrison (1988). Shedding Light on Bats. BioScience 38 (5):351-352.score: 15.0
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  28. Hans-Ulrich Schnitzler & Elisabeth K. V. Kalko (2001). Echolocation by Insect-Eating Bats. BioScience 51 (7):557.score: 15.0
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  29. Hans-Ulrich Schnitzler & Elisabeth K. V. Kalko (2001). Echolocation by Insect-Eating Bats We Define Four Distinct Functional Groups of Bats and Find Differences in Signal Structure That Correlate with the Typical Echolocation Tasks Faced by Each Group. BioScience 51 (7):557-569.score: 15.0
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  30. Henry Simoni-Wastila (2000). Particularity and Consciousness: Wittgenstein and Nagel on Privacy, Beetles and Bats. Philosophy Today 44 (4):415-425.score: 15.0
  31. Henry Sinnoni-Wastila (2000). Particularity and Consciousness: Wittgenstein and Nagel on Privacy, Beetles, and Bats. Philosophy Today 44 (4):415-425.score: 15.0
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  32. J. G. M. Thewissen & S. K. Babcock (1992). The Origin of Flight in Bats. BioScience 42 (5):340-345.score: 15.0
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  33. Sean Allen-Hermanson (2014). Strong Neurophilosophy and the Matter of Bat Consciousness: A Case Study. Erkenntnis:1-20.score: 14.0
    In “What is it like to be boring and myopic?” Kathleen Akins offers an interesting, empirically driven, argument for thinking that there is nothing that it is like to be a bat. She suggests that bats are “boring” in the sense that they are governed by behavioral scripts and simple, non-representational, control loops, and are best characterized as biological automatons. Her approach has been well received by philosophers sympathetic to empirically informed philosophy of mind. But, despite its influence, her (...)
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  34. Yonah Weinrib (2004). The Bat Mitzvah Treasury: A Collection of Illumination, Calligraphy, Inspiring Messages, Essays, and Laws for the Young Woman as She Becomes Bat Mitzvah. Distributed by Mesorah Publications.score: 7.0
     
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  35. Yujin Nagasawa (2003). Thomas Versus Thomas: A New Approach to Nagel's Bat Argument. Inquiry 46 (3):377-395.score: 6.0
    i l l ustrat es t he di ffi cul t y of providing a purely physical characterisation of phenomenal experi ence wi t ha vi vi d exampl e about a bat ’ s sensory apparatus. Whi l e a number of obj ect i ons have al ready been made to Nagel..
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  36. Mark Heller (1990). The Ontology of Physical Objects: Four-Dimensional Hunks of Matter. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    This provocative new book attempts to resolve traditional problems of identity over time. It seeks to answer such questions as "How is it that an object can survive change?" and "How much change can an object undergo without being destroyed?" To answer these questions Professor Heller presents a completely new theory about the nature of physical objects and about the relationship between our language and the physical world. According to his theory, the only actually existing physical entities are what the (...)
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  37. Neil Levy, Closing the Door on BAT.score: 6.0
    BAT - the belief in ability thesis - states, roughly, that for an agent to be able rationally to deliberate between two or more alternatives, she must believe that she is metaphysically free to perform each alternative. I show, by way of a counterexample, that BAT is false.
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  38. Shinya Fujii & Gottfried Schlaug (2013). The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): A Battery for Assessing Beat Perception and Production and Their Dissociation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:771.score: 6.0
    Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: 1) music tapping test (MTT), 2) beat saliency test (BST), 3) beat interval test (BIT), and 4) beat finding and interval test (BFIT). (...)
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  39. Thomas Nagel (1974). What is It Like to Be a Bat? Philosophical Review 83 (October):435-50.score: 5.0
  40. Laurence BonJour (2013). What is It Like to Be Human (Instead of a Bat). American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):373-386.score: 5.0
    My purpose in this paper is to discuss and defend an objection to physicalist or materialist accounts of the mind.
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  41. P. M. S. Hacker (2002). Is There Anything It is Like to Be a Bat? Philosophy 77 (300):157-174.score: 5.0
    The concept of consciousness has been the source of much philosophical, cognitive scientific and neuroscientific discussion for the past two decades. Many scientists, as well as philosophers, argue that at the moment we are almost completely in the dark about the nature of consciousness. Stuart Sutherland, in a much quoted remark, wrote that.
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  42. Robert Hanna, What is It Like to Be a Bat in Pain? Kinds of Animal Minds and the Moral Comparison Principle.score: 5.0
  43. Andrew R. Bailey (2005). What is It Like to See a Bat? A Critique of Dretske's Representationalist Theory of Qualia. Disputatio 1 (18):1 - 27.score: 5.0
    This paper critiques the representationalist account of qualia, focussing on the Representational Naturalism presented by Fred Dretske in Naturalizing the Mind. After laying out Dretske�s theory of qualia and making clear its externalist consequences, I argue that Dretske�s definition is either too liberal or runs into problems defending its requirements, in particular �naturalness� and �mentalness.� I go on to show that Dretske�s account of qualia falls foul of the argument from misperception in such a way that Dretske must either admit (...)
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  44. John Sutton (2007). Batting, Habit, and Memory: The Embodied Mind and the Nature of Skill. Sport in Society 10 (5):763-786.score: 5.0
    in Jeremy McKenna (ed), At the Boundaries of Cricket, to be published in 2007 as a special issue of the journal Sport in Society and as a book in the series Sport in the Global Society (Taylor and Francis).
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  45. Bryan Frances (2007). Externalism, Physicalism, Statues, and Hunks. Philosophical Studies 133 (2):199-232.score: 5.0
    Content externalism is the dominant view in the philosophy of mind. Content essentialism, the thesis that thought tokens have their contents essentially, is also popular. And many externalists are supporters of such essentialism. However, endorsing the conjunction of those views either (i) commits one to a counterintuitive view of the underlying physical nature of thought tokens or (ii) commits one to a slightly different but still counterintuitive view of the relation of thought tokens to physical tokens as well as a (...)
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  46. Kathleen Wider (1990). Overtones of Solipsism in Thomas Nagel's "What is It Like to Be a Bat?" And the View From Nowhere. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (3):481-499.score: 5.0
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  47. David R. Pugmire (1989). Bat or Batman. Philosophy 64 (April):207-17.score: 5.0
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  48. J. Christopher Maloney (1986). About Being a Bat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (March):26-49.score: 5.0
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  49. Nic Damnjanovic (2009). Sperm, Eggs and Hunks: Biological Origins and Identity. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 24 (2):113-126.score: 5.0
    In several publications Graeme Forbes has developed and defended one of the strongest arguments for essentialism about biological origins. I attempt to show that there are deep, as yet unrecognized, problems with this argument. The problems with Forbes’s argument suggest that a range of other arguments for various forms of origin essentialism are also likely to be flawed, and that we should abandon the seemingly plausible general metaphysical thesis that concrete entities that share all intrinsic properties are identical.
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  50. Philip Whalen (2011). From 'Bat-Filled Slimy Ruins' to 'Gastronomic Delights'. Environment, Space, Place 3 (1):99-139.score: 5.0
    The modernization of Burgundy during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries drew on the coordinated efforts of numerous industrial and cultural sectors. Among these innovative developments, new tourism industries played a prominent role in providing new opportunities for the consumption of local products while redefining existing conceptions of Burgundian landscapes. This entailed collaboration of a variety of cultural intermediaries ranging from local boosters to politicians and from merchants to academics. Geographers contributed by incorporating symbolic, subjective, and performative practices into (...)
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