Search results for 'Husserl's philosophy of science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas Mormann (1991). Husserl's Philosophy of Science and the Semantic Approach. Philosophy of Science 58 (1):61-83.score: 1698.0
    Husserl's mathematical philosophy of science can be considered an anticipation of the contemporary postpositivistic semantic approach, which regards mathematics and not logic as the appropriate tool for the exact philosophical reconstruction of scientific theories. According to Husserl, an essential part of a theory's reconstruction is the mathematical description of its domain, that is, the world (or the part of the world) the theory intends to talk about. Contrary to the traditional micrological approach favored by the members of (...)
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  2. Patrick A. Heelan (1987). Husserl's Later Philosophy of Natural Science. Philosophy of Science 54 (3):368-390.score: 1533.0
    Husserl argues in the Crisis that the prevalent tradition of positive science in his time had a philosophical core, called by him "Galilean science", that mistook the quest for objective theory with the quest for truth. Husserl is here referring to Gottingen science of the Golden Years. For Husserl, theory "grows" out of the "soil" of the prescientific, that is, pretheoretical, life-world. Scientific truth finally is to be sought not in theory but rather in the pragmatic-perceptual praxes (...)
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  3. Jarosław Rolewski (2013). Husserl's Philosophy of Science. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (2):145-160.score: 1419.0
    The paper presents Husserl’s conception of the relation between science and the living world (Lebenswelt), i.e. the world of everyday experience and communication. In Husserl view, science, or, more precisely, its basic aprioric structure is founded on the primal, essential core of the living world (a priori) from which it obtains its sense. Science (scientific a priori) modifies, idealizes, and mathematizes the primal aprioric Lebenswelt. Due to those operations scientific theories can represent empirical reality.
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  4. Kyeong-Seop Choi (2007). Philosophy as Rigorous Regional Studies: A Parody of E. Husserl's Philosophy as Rigorous Science. Idealistic Studies 37 (3):203-218.score: 1398.0
    The present paper traces the trajectory of the development of Husserl’s phenomenology from its incipient eidetic phase over the transcendental to the lifeworld-phenomenological, and ascertains that, in spite of all their complexities, the idea of Zu den Sachen selbst is the very objective of all those ‘phenomenological’investigations. The search after the ‘immediately given’ (Vorgegebenheiten) finally discovers that the concrete cultural life-worlds are the authentically ‘immediatelypre-given’ and all kinds of knowledge and sciences (higher cultural configurations) are nothing but idealizations of those (...)
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  5. Michael Barber (2006). Philosophy and Reflection: A Critique of Frank Welz's Sociological and “Processual” Criticism of Husserl and Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):141 - 157.score: 1377.0
    Frank Welz’s Kritik der Lebenswelt undertakes a sociology of knowledge criticism of the work of Edmund Husserl and Alfred Schutz that construes them as developing absolutist, egological systems opposed to the “processual” worldview prominent since the modern rise of natural science. Welz, though, misunderstands the work of Schutz and Husserl and neglects how their focus on consciousness and eidetic features pertains to the kind of reflection that one must undertake if one would avoid succumbing to absolutism, that uncovers the (...)
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  6. Babette Babich (2007). Continental Philosophy of Science. In Constantin Boundas (ed.), The Edinburgh Companion to the Twentieth Century Philosophies. Edinburgh. University of Edinburgh Press. 545--558.score: 1361.0
    Continental philosophies of science tend to exemplify holistic themes connecting order and contingency, questions and answers, writers and readers, speakers and hearers. Such philosophies of science also tend to feature a fundamental emphasis on the historical and cultural situatedness of discourse as significant; relevance of mutual attunement of speaker and hearer; necessity of pre-linguistic cognition based in human engagement with a common socio-cultural historical world; role of narrative and metaphor as explanatory; sustained emphasis on understanding questioning; truth seen (...)
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  7. Uljana Feest (2012). Husserl's Crisis as a Crisis of Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):493-503.score: 1350.0
    This paper places Husserl’s mature work, The Crisis of the European Sciences, in the context of his engagement with – and critique of – experimental psychology at the time. I begin by showing (a) that Husserl accorded psychology a crucial role in his philosophy, i.e., that of providing a scientific analysis of subjectivity, and (b) that he viewed contemporary psychology – due to its naturalism – as having failed to pursue this goal in the appropriate manner. I then provide (...)
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  8. P. Heelan (1989). Husserl's Philosophy of Science. In William R. McKenna & J. N. Mohanty (eds.), Husserl's Phenomenology: A Textbook. University Press of America. 387--428.score: 1236.0
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  9. Hans Wagner (1974). Husserl's Ambiguous Philosophy of Science. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):169-185.score: 1212.0
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  10. Erazim Kohák (1985). Jan Patočka, Edmund Husserl's Philosophy of the Crisis of Science and His Conception of a Phenomenology of the “Life-World”. Husserl Studies 2 (2):129-155.score: 1176.0
  11. Justin Humphreys (2014). Husserl's Archaeology of Exact Science. Husserl Studies 30 (2):101-127.score: 1146.0
    Why is nature amenable to mathematical description? This question has received attention in the philosophy of science but rarely from a phenomenological perspective. Nevertheless Husserl’s late essay “The Origin of Geometry,” which has received some critical scholarly attention in recent years, contains the beginning of a striking answer. This answer proceeds from Husserl’s main claim in that essay, which he also makes in the Crisis of the European Sciences, that the original meaning of science has been covered (...)
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  12. Richard L. Lanigan (2011). Husserl's Phenomenology in America (USA): The Human Science Legacy of Wilbur Marshall Urban and the Yale School of Communicology. Schutzian Research. A Yearbook of Worldly Phenomenology and Qualitative Social Science 3:203-217.score: 1047.0
    Edmund Husserl gave his famous London Lectures (in German) in June 1922 where he says his purpose is to explain “transcendental sociological [intersubjective] phenomenology having reference to a manifest multiplicity of conscious subjects communicating with one another”. This effective definitionof semiotic phenomenology as Communicology was reported in English (1923) by Charles K. Ogden and I. A. Richards in the first book on the topic titled The Meaning of Meaning. This groundwork was in full development by 1939 with the first detailed (...)
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  13. Carlo Ierna (2013). Husserl’s Philosophy of Arithmetic in Reviews. The New Yearbook for Phenomonology and Phenomenological Philosophy:198-242.score: 1039.2
    This present collection of (translations of) reviews is intended to help obtain a more balanced picture of the reception and impact of Edmund Husserl’s first book, the 1891 Philosophy of Arithmetic. One of the insights to be gained from this non-exhaustive collection of reviews is that the Philosophy of Arithmetic had a much more widespread reception than hitherto assumed: in the present collection alone there already are fourteen, all published between 1891 and 1895. Three of the reviews appeared (...)
     
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  14. Eric J. Mohr (2012). Phenomenological Intuition and the Problem of Philosophy as Method and Science: Scheler and Husserl. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 16 (2):218-234.score: 1026.0
    Scheler subjects Husserl’s categorial intuition to a critique, which calls into question the very methodological procedure of phenomenology. Scheler’s divergence from Husserl with respect to whether sensory or categorial contents furnish the foundation of the act of intuition leads into a more significant divergence with respect to whether phenomenology should, primarily, be considered a form of science to which a specific methodology applies. Philosophical methods, according to Scheler, must presuppose, and not distract from, important preconditions of knowledge that pertain (...)
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  15. Dermot Moran (2008). Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy and the Critique of Naturalism. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):401-425.score: 1017.4
    Throughout his career, Husserl identifies naturalism as the greatest threat to both the sciences and philosophy. In this paper, I explicate Husserl’s overall diagnosis and critique of naturalism and then examine the specific transcendental aspect of his critique. Husserl agreed with the Neo-Kantians in rejecting naturalism. He has three major critiques of naturalism: First, it (like psychologism and for the same reasons) is ‘countersensical’ in that it denies the very ideal laws that it needs for its own justification. Second, (...)
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  16. Denis Fisette (2010). Descriptive Psychology and Natural Sciences: Husserl’s Early Criticism of Brentano. In C. Iena (ed.), Edmund Husserl 150 Years: Philosophy, Phenomenology, Sciences. Springer. 221--253.score: 1008.2
    In defining his phenomenology as descriptive psychology in the introduction to the first edition of his Logical Investigations 1, Husserl suggests that the field study of his phenomenology as his methodology are very close to that of Brentano’s psychology, and that the research in the book somehow contributes to Brentano’s philosophical program, one of whose main axes is psychology or philosophy of mind.
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  17. Robert Scharff (2011). Displacing Epistemology: Being in the Midst of Technoscientific Practice. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 16 (2):227-243.score: 993.0
    Interest the Erklären–Verstehen debate is usually interpreted as primarily epistemological. By raising the possibility that there are fundamentally different methods for fundamentally different types of science, the debate puts into play all the standard issues—that is, issues concerning scientific explanation and justification, the unity and diversity of scientific disciplines, the reality of their subject matter, the accessibility of various subject matters to research, and so on. In this paper, however, I do not focus on any of these specific issues. (...)
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  18. Babette Babich (2011). Towards a Critical Philosophy of Science: Continental Beginnings and Bugbears, Whigs, and Waterbears. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (4):343-391.score: 963.0
    Continental philosophy of science has developed alongside mainstream analytic philosophy of science. But where continental approaches are inclusive, analytic philosophies of science are not?excluding not merely Nietzsche?s philosophy of science but Gödel?s philosophy of physics. As a radicalization of Kant, Nietzsche?s critical philosophy of science puts science in question and Nietzsche?s critique of the methodological foundations of classical philology bears on science, particularly evolution as well as style (in (...)
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  19. Dermot Moran (2012). Husserl's Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 948.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction: Husserl's life and writings; 1. Husserl's Crisis: an unfinished masterpiece; 2. Galileo's revolution and the origins of modern science; 3. The Crisis in psychology; 4. Rethinking tradition: Husserl on history; 5. Husserl's problematical concept of the life-world; 6. Phenomenology as transcendental philosophy; 7. The ongoing influence of Husserl's Crisis.
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  20. Jeff Kochan (2011). Husserl and the Phenomenology of Science. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (3):467-471.score: 939.0
    This article critically reviews an outstanding collection of new essays addressing Edmund Husserl’s Crisis of European Sciences. In Science and the Life-World (Stanford, 2010), David Hyder and Hans-Jörg Rheinberger bring together an impressive range of first-rate philosophers and historians. The collection explicates key concepts in Husserl’s often obscure work, compares Husserl’s phenomenology of science to the parallel tradition of historical epistemology, and provocatively challenges Husserl’s views on science. The explications are uniformly clear and helpful, the comparative work (...)
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  21. Srećko Kovač (2008). Gödel, Kant, and the Path of a Science. Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):147-169.score: 903.0
    Gödel's philosophical views were to a significant extent influenced by the study not only of Leibniz or Husserl, but also of Kant. Both Gödel and Kant aimed at the secure foundation of philosophy, the certainty of knowledge and the solvability of all meaningful problems in philosophy. In this paper, parallelisms between the foundational crisis of metaphysics in Kant's view and the foundational crisis of mathematics in Gödel's view are elaborated, especially regarding the problem of finding the “secure path (...)
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  22. Mary Jeanne Larrabee, Michael Goldman & Robert J. Dostal (1985). Book Reviews. John Sallis (Ed.): 'Husserl and Contemporary Thought'. Patrick A. Heelan: 'Space-Perception and the Philosophy of Science'. Ernst Orth (Ed.): 'Zeit Und Zeitlichkeit Bei Husserl Und Heidegger (Phanomenologische Forschungen, Volume 14)'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 2 (1).score: 903.0
    Husserl and Contemporary Thought contains twelve essays that address certain key themes in Husserl's thought, each in some way confronting issues critical to the Husserlian project. The essays first appeared in the 1982 volume of Research in Phenornenology. The "contemporary thought" in the title should be understood in a limited sense as refer- ring to certain strains of thinking pursued in the present decade, build- ing however on past research. The volume shows several directions in which contemporary thinkers are (...)
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  23. Henning Peucker (2012). Husserl's Foundation of the Formal Sciences in His “Logical Investigations”. Axiomathes 22 (1):135-146.score: 854.4
    This article is composed of three sections that investigate the epistemological foundations of Husserl’s idea of logic from the Logical Investigations . First, it shows the general structure of this logic. Husserl conceives of logic as a comprehensive, multi-layered theory of possible theories that has its most fundamental level in a doctrine of meaning. This doctrine aims to determine the elementary categories that constitute every possible meaning (meaning-categories). The second section presents the main idea of Husserl’s search for an epistemological (...)
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  24. Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock (2006). Husserl's Philosophy of Mathematics: Its Origin and Relevance. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 22 (3):193-222.score: 837.6
    This paper offers an exposition of Husserl's mature philosophy of mathematics, expounded for the first time in Logische Untersuchungen and maintained without any essential change throughout the rest of his life. It is shown that Husserl's views on mathematics were strongly influenced by Riemann, and had clear affinities with the much later Bourbaki school.
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  25. Thomas J. Nenon (2008). Some Differences Between Kant's and Husserl's Conceptions of Transcendental Philosophy. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):427-439.score: 832.8
    This article compares the differences between Kant’s and Husserl’s conceptions of the “transcendental.” It argues that, for Kant, the term “transcendental” stands for what is otherwise called “metaphysical,” i.e. non-empirical knowledge. As opposed to his predecessors, who had believed that such non-empirical knowledge was possible for meta-physical, i.e. transcendent objects, Kant’s contribution was to show how there can be non-empirical (a priori) knowledge not about transcendent objects, but about the necessary conditions for the experience of natural, non-transcendent objects. Hence the (...)
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  26. Robert Sokolowski (2008). Husserl's Discovery of Philosophical Discourse. Husserl Studies 24 (3):167-175.score: 831.0
    Husserl’s Idea of Phenomenology is his first systematic attempt to show how phenomenology differs from natural science and in particular psychology. He does this by the phenomenological reduction. One of his achievements is to show that the formal structures of intentionality are more akin to logic than to psychology. I claim that Husserl’s argument can be made more intuitive if we consider phenomenology to be the study of truth rather than knowledge, and if we see the reduction as primarily (...)
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  27. J. Philip Miller (1982). Numbers in Presence and Absence: A Study of Husserl's Philosophy of Mathematics. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston, Inc..score: 830.4
    CHAPTER I THE EMERGENCE AND DEVELOPMENT OF HUSSERL'S 'PHILOSOPHY OF ARITHMETIC'. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND: WEIERSTRASS AND THE ARITHMETIZATION OF ANALYSIS In ...
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  28. H. Turker (2013). Horkheimer's Criticism of Husserl. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (7):619-635.score: 822.0
    This article focuses on Max Horkheimer’s criticism of Husserl’s phenomenology in basic philosophical matters such as method, theory, logic, truth, metaphysics, etc. Horkheimer objects to Husserl’s conception of philosophy as a mathesis universalis and of science as relativistic research. However, he finds Husserl’s criticism of scientific rationalism the most important step for the legitimacy of philosophy. According to him, Husserl’s method is intended to be a science of apriority. But his understanding of apriority is static, is (...)
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  29. David Carr (1974/2009). Phenomenology and the Problem of History: A Study of Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy. Northwestern University Press.score: 811.2
    In Phenomenology and the Problem of History. David Carr examines the paradox involving Husserl's transcendental philosophy and his later historicist theory.
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  30. Richard Feist (2002). Weyl's Appropriation of Husserl's and Poincaré's Thought. Synthese 132 (3):273 - 301.score: 807.0
    This article locates Weyl''s philosophy of mathematics and its relationship to his philosophy of science within the epistemological and ontological framework of Husserl''s phenomenology as expressed in the Logical Investigations and Ideas. This interpretation permits a unified reading of Weyl''s scattered philosophical comments in The Continuum and Space-Time-Matter. But the article also indicates that Weyl employed Poincaré''s predicativist concerns to modify Husserl''s semantics and trim Husserl''s ontology. Using Poincaré''s razor to shave Husserl''s beard leads to limitations on (...)
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  31. Carlo Ierna (2005). The Beginnings of Husserl's Philosophy. Part 1: From "Über den Begriff der Zahl" to "Philosophie der Arithmetik&Quot;. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 5:1-56.score: 806.4
    The article examines the development of Husserl’s early philosophy from his Habilitationsschrift (1887) to the Philosophie der Arithmetik (1891). -/- An attempt will be made at reconstructing the lost Habilitationsschrift (of which only the first chapter survives, which we know as Über den Begriff der Zahl). The examined sources show that the original version of the Habilitationsschrift was by far broader than the printed version, and included most topics of the PA. -/- The article contains an extensive and detailed (...)
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  32. Carlo Ierna (2006). The Beginnings of Husserl's Philosophy. Part 2: Mathematical and Philosophical Background. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 6 (1):23-71.score: 806.4
    The article examines the development of Husserl’s early philosophy from his Habilitationsschrift (1887) to the Philosophie der Arithmetik (1891). -/- An attempt will be made at reconstructing the lost Habilitationsschrift (of which only the first chapter survives, which we know as Über den Begriff der Zahl). The examined sources show that the original version of the Habilitationsschrift was by far broader than the printed version, and included most topics of the PA. -/- The article contains an extensive and detailed (...)
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  33. Carlos Sanchez (2007). The Nature of Belief and the Method of Its Justification in Husserl's Philosophy. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (2).score: 806.4
    The present paper attempts to accomplish the following: (1) to clarify and critically discuss the phenomenology of “belief” as we find it in Husserl’s Ideas Pertaining to a Pure Phenomenology and to a Phenomenological Philosophy, First Book (1913) (henceforward, Ideas I); (2) to clarify and critically discuss the manner in which the phenomenological method treats beliefs; (3) to clarify and critically discuss the manner of belief justification as described by the phenomenological method; and (4) to argue that, just as (...)
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  34. S. Crowell (2010). Husserl's Subjectivism: The "Thoroughly Peculiar 'Forms'" of Consciousness and the Philosophy of Mind. In Carlo Ierna, Hanne Jaccobs & Filip Mattens (eds.), PHILOSOPHY PHENOMENOLOGY SCIENCES. Springer. 363--389.score: 804.8
    In a recent paper1 which critically examines and rejects several suggestions that have been made for “bridging the gap” between Husserl’s phenomenology and neuroscience, Rick Grush concludes on a positive note: It should be obvious enough that while I have been highly critical of van Gelder, Varela and Lloyd, there is a clear sense in which the four of us are on the same team. We all believe that an important source of insights for the task of understanding of mentality (...)
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  35. Sara Heinämaa (1999). Merleau-Ponty's Modification of Phenomenology: Cognition, Passion and Philosophy. Synthese 118 (1):49-68.score: 804.0
    This paper problematizes the analogy that Hubert Dreyfus has presented between phenomenology and cognitive science. It argues that Dreyfus presents Merleau-Ponty''s modification of Husserl''s phenomenology in a misleading way. He ignores the idea of philosophy as a radical interrogation and self-responsibility that stems from Husserl''s work and recurs in Merleau-Ponty''s Phenomenology of Perception. The paper focuses on Merleau-Ponty''s understanding of the phenomenological reduction. It shows that his critical idea was not to restrict the scope of Husserl''s reductions but (...)
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  36. Jacques Derrida (2003). The Problem of Genesis in Husserl's Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.score: 796.8
    Derrida's first book-length work, The Problem of Genesis in Husserl's Philosophy , was originally written as a dissertation for his diplôme d'etudes superieures in 1953 and 1954. Surveying Husserl's major works on phenomenology, Derrida reveals what he sees as an internal tension in Husserl's central notion of genesis, and gives us our first glimpse into the concerns and frustrations that would later lead Derrida to abandon phenomenology and develop his now famous method of deconstruction. For Derrida, (...)
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  37. Peter Andras Varga (2011). The Architectonic and History Of Phenomenology: Distinguishing Between Fink's and Husserl's Notion of Phenomenological Philosophy. In Phenomenology 2010 vol. 4: Selected Essays from Northern Europe.score: 796.8
    It is the aim of my paper to explore the chances of a decidedly historical approach to Eugen Fink's involvement in Edmund Husserl's mature philosophy. This question has been subject to much debate recently; but I think that the recently published early notes of Fink have not been sufficiently evaluated by Husserl scholarship. I embed the investigation of Fink's ideas in the contemporaries reactions to them, and argue that Fink's very specific methodological ideas was already formulated in details (...)
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  38. Peter Andras Varga (2010). Psychologism as Positive Heritage of Husserl's Phenomenological Philosophy. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:135-161.score: 789.6
    Husserl is famous for his critique of foundational psychologism. However, his relationship to psychologism is not entirely negative. His conception of philosophy is indebted also to nineteenth-century ideas of a psychological foundation of logic and philosophy. This is manifest both in historical influences on Husserl and in debates between Husserl and his contemporaries. These areas are to be investigated, with a particular focus on the Logical Investigations and the works from the period of Husserl’s transition to the transcendental (...)
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  39. Lee Hardy (2014). Nature’s Suit: Husserl’s Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences. Ohio University Press.score: 774.6
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  40. Carlo Ierna (2012). Husserl's Psychology of Arithmetic. Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique 8 (1):97-120.score: 768.0
    In 1913, in a draft for a new Preface for the second edition of the Logical Investigations, Edmund Husserl reveals to his readers that "The source of all my studies and the first source of my epistemological difficul­ties lies in my first works on the philosophy of arithmetic and mathematics in general", i.e. his Habilitationsschrift and the Philosophy of Arithmetic: "I carefully studied the consciousness constituting the amount, first the collec­tive consciousness (consciousness of quantity, of multiplicity) in its (...)
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  41. Andrzej Klawiter (2004). Why Did Husserl Not Become the Galileo of the Science of Consciousness? Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 82 (1):253-271.score: 742.0
    It is well known that Husserl clearly recognized the importance of the introduction of idealization in physics and its contribution to the further advancement in natural sciences. The history of the successful applications of idealization in natural sciences encouraged attempts to extend the use of this sophisticated instrument of theoretical investigation and theory construction to other domains of science. Since Husserl designed his phenomenology as the rigorous science of consciousness we have to find out why he did not (...)
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  42. Eduard Marbach (2010). Is There a Metaphysics of Consciousness Without a Phenomenology of Consciousness? Some Thoughts Derived From Husserl's Philosophical Phenomenology. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (67):141-154.score: 732.0
    The paper first addresses Husserl's conception of philosophical phenomenology, metaphysics, and the relation between them, in order to explain why, on Husserl's view, there is no metaphysics of consciousness without a phenomenology of consciousness. In doing so, it recalls some of the methodological tenets of Husserl's phenomenology, pointing out that phenomenology is an eidetic or a priori science which has first of all to do with mere ideal possibilities of consciousness and its correlates; metaphysics of consciousness, (...)
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  43. Yusuk Lee (2008). The Role of Positivism in Husserl's Transcendental Phenomenology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:61-68.score: 729.0
    Husserl’s phenomenology opens itself with a critique of positive sciences. Husserl problematizes the hardcore presupposition of positivism that the world is a definite sort of an existential totality of objects and thus it is exhaustible with empirical data and deductive-conceptual abstraction on the basis of causalspatio-temoprality. Criticizing the wholesome reduction of nature into a physical reality and the instrumentalizing of theoretical reason, he proposes transcendental phenomenology, as an ideal form of science. Self-entitled as the genuine science, the (...) of origin, the science of all sciences, etc., it concerns itself with the matter of validity. Claiming that validating objectivity as such and the meaning of scientific objectification is something of which onlyphenomenological reflection on pure consciousness is capable and that the positivistic objectivity is and must be founded on transcendental subjectivity, Husserl radically idealistically revised the whole positivistic concept of evidence and givenness of a fact and substituted it with the phenomenological notion of apriori self-evidence and originary givenness of primordial intentional consciousness. Nevertheless, it is noticed that the absolute universal validity of positivistic objectivity was never rejected or questioned; objectivity is still in and of itself an absolute criterion of scientificity in Husserl. This paper will argue that the idealistic turn toward subjectivity takes place through factualization of transcendentality and this, by bestowing apriori apodicticity with facticity, even enhances more the supreme epistemological function of positivity. It will discuss such positivistic drive, directly bequeathed from the very cultural ethos at which phenomenological criticism targeted, as an important locomotive for Husserl’s program and point out an antinomical consequence with which it is to be faced as a consequence. (shrink)
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  44. Xiaoli Liu (2010). Gödel's Philosophical Program and Husserl's Phenomenology. Synthese 175 (1):33 - 45.score: 714.0
    Gödel’s philosophical rationalism includes a program for “developing philosophy as an exact science.” Gödel believes that Husserl’s phenomenology is essential for the realization of this program. In this article, by analyzing Gödel’s philosophy of idealism, conceptual realism, and his concept of “abstract intuition,” based on clues from Gödel’s manuscripts, I try to investigate the reasons why Gödel is strongly interested in Husserl’s phenomenology and why his program for an exact philosophy is unfinished. One of the topics (...)
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  45. H. Pietersma (1966). Husserl's Concept of Philosophy. Dialogue 5 (03):425-442.score: 710.4
    As philosophers speak, they think that there are things whicht they can see and speak about as philosophers. But what are these things? And what is the general character of the philosopher's statements? How can we find out whether they are true? If, as is widely agreed, the philosopher does not rely on empirical research, in which direction ought we to look for the evidence to support philosophical statements? Husserl's transcendental-phenomenological reduction, we propose to show, can best be understood (...)
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  46. David B. Allison (2005). Derrida's Critique of Husserl and the Philosophy of Presence. Veritas 50 (1).score: 703.2
    O autor reexamina a crítica de Derrida à fenomenologia de Husserl de forma a mostrar como a sua coerência estrutural emerge não tanto de uma redução a uma doutrina particular, mas antes das exigências de uma concepção unitária, especificamente impostas pelas determinações epistemológicas e metafísicas da presença. PALAVRAS-CHAVE – Desconstrução. Derrida. Fenomenologia. Husserl. Presença. Significado. ABSTRACT – The author reexamines Derrida’s critique of Husserl’s phenomenology, so as to show how its structural coherency arises not so much from the reduction to (...)
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  47. Adam Konopka (2008). A Renewal of Husserl's Critique of Naturalism. Environmental Philosophy 5 (1):37-59.score: 696.0
    This essay argues that phenomenology is uniquely suited to critique naturalism without lapsing into a romantic, anti-scientific, or dystopian view of modern science. This argument situates Husserl’s retrieval of the environmental relation in the Vienna Lecture between two alternative tendencies in contemporary ecological phenomenology: 1) the rejection of or indifference to the positive sciences, and 2) the adoption of naturalism in phenomenological methodology. On the one hand, the claim is that the phenomenological return to the environment should not imply (...)
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  48. Y. Senderowicz (2011). Anxiety the Birth Pangs of the Absolute: Longing and Angst in Schelling and Kierkegaard / B. Bergo ; Attunement and Disorientation: The Moods of Philosophy in Heidegger and Sartre / S. Mulhall ; Anxiety and Identity: Beyond Husserl and Heidegger. In Hagi Kenaan & Ilit Ferber (eds.), Philosophy's Moods: The Affective Grounds of Thinking. Springer.score: 684.0
     
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  49. Barry Smith (1994). Husserl’s Theory of Meaning and Reference. In L. Haaparanta (ed.), Mind, Meaning and Mathematics. Essays on the Philosophy of Husserl and Frege. Kluwer.score: 681.6
    This paper is a contribution to the historical roots of the analytical tradition. As Michael Dummett points out in his Origins of Analytic Philosophy, many tendencies in Central European thought contributed to the early development of analytic philosophy. Dummett himself concentrates on just one aspect of this historical complex, namely on the relationship between the theories of meaning and reference developed by Frege and by Husserl in the years around the turn of the century. It is to this (...)
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  50. Xiaogang Ke (2006). A Phenomenological Reading of Hegel's Concept of History of Philosophy: An Analysis of “the Gallery of Opinions”, “the Gallery of Knowledge” and “the Gallery of Dresden”. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):51-59.score: 674.4
    From a phenomenological perspective of game-space and horizon, this paper tries to make a deconstructive reading of Hegel's "two galleries", namely, "the gallery of opinions" and "the gallery of knowledge", which are mentioned in the introduction of Hegel's Lectures on the History of Philosophy. The reading shows that the Game-space or the ab-gruendiger Grund of the Hegelian concept of philosophical history lies in an originally differencing space that is keeping in absence, which is called by Edmund Husserl and Jacques (...)
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