Search results for 'Hypnosis*' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tim Bayne (2007). Hypnosis and the Unity of Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 93-109.
    Hypnosis appears to generate unusual—and sometimes even astonishing—changes in the contents of consciousness. Hypnotic subjects report perceiving things that are not there, they report not perceiving things that are there, and they report unusual alterations in the phenomenology of agency. In addition to apparent alterations in the contents of consciousness, hypnosis also appears to involve alterations in the structure of consciousness. According to many theorists—most notably Hilgard—hypnosis demonstrates that the unity of consciousness is an illusion (Hilgard 1977).
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  2.  78
    Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). HYPNOSIS INDUCES A CHANGED COMPOSITION OF BRAIN OSCILLATIONS IN EEG: A CASE STUDY. Contemporary Hypnosis 24 (1):3-18.
    Cognitive functions associated with the frontal lobes of the brain may be specifi cally involved in hypnosis. Thus, the frontal area of the brain has recently been of great interest when searching for neural changes associated with hypnosis. We tested the hypothesis that EEG during pure hypnosis would differ from the normal non-hypnotic EEG especially above the frontal area of the brain. The composition of brain oscillations was examined in a broad frequency band (130 Hz) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) of (...)
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  3. Ronald J. Pekala & V. K. Kumar (2007). An Empirical-Phenomenological Approach to Quantifying Consciousness and States of Consciousness: With Particular Reference to Understanding the Nature of Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 167-194.
     
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  4. Zoltán Dienes & Josef Perner (2007). Executive Control Without Conscious Awareness: The Cold Control Theory of Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 293-314.
  5. Tobias Egner & Amir Raz (2007). Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 29-50.
  6.  59
    Pierre Rainville & Donald D. Price (2003). Hypnosis Phenomenology and the Neurobiology of Consciousness. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis 51 (2):105-29.
  7.  5
    Peter L. N. Naish (2007). Time Distortion, and the Nature of Hypnosis and Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 271-292.
  8. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 145-165.
     
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  9.  79
    John Gruzelier (2005). Altered States of Consciousness and Hypnosis in the Twenty-First Century: Comment. Contemporary Hypnosis 22 (1):1-7.
  10.  49
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Cortex Functional Connectivity as a Neurophysiological Correlate of Hypnosis: An EEG Case Study. Neuropsychologia 45 (7):14521462.
    Cortex functional connectivity associated with hypnosis was investigated in a single highly hypnotizable subject in a normal baseline condition and under neutral hypnosis during two sessions separated by a year. After the hypnotic induction, but without further suggestions as compared to the baseline condition, all studied parameters of local and remote functional connectivity were significantly changed. The significant differences between hypnosis and the baseline condition were observable (to different extent) in five studied independent frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and (...)
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  11.  46
    John F. Kihlstrom (2005). Is Hypnosis an Altered State of Consciousness or What?: Comment. Contemporary Hypnosis 22 (1):34-38.
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  12.  27
    Brian R. Vandenberg (2010). Evidence, Ontology, and Psychological Science: The Lesson of Hypnosis. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 30 (1):51-65.
    Data are never free of philosophical encumbrances. Nevertheless, philosophical issues are often considered peripheral to method and evidence. Historical perspectives likewise are not considered integral to most data-driven disputes in contemporary psychological science. This paper examines the history of the investigation of hypnosis over the last 75 years to illuminate how evidence and method are entangled with epistemology and ontology, how new research directions are forged by changes in the cultural and philosophical landscape, and how unacknowledged philosophical assumptions can result (...)
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  13.  9
    Erik Woody & Henry Szechtman (2007). To See Feelingly: Emotion, Motivation, and Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 241-255.
  14.  8
    Adrian Burgess (2007). On the Contribution of Neurophysiology to Hypnosis Research: Current State and Future Directions. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 195-219.
  15.  26
    Ernest L. Rossi & Kathryn L. Rossi (2006). The Neuroscience of Observing Consciousness & Mirror Neurons in Therapeutic Hypnosis. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 48 (4):263-278.
  16.  93
    Graham A. Jamieson (ed.) (2007). Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    The phenomenon of hypnosis provides a rich paradigm for those seeking to understand the processes that underlie consciousness. Understanding hypnosis tells us about a basic human capacity for altered experiences that is often overlooked in contemporary western societies. Throughout the 200 year history of psychology, hypnosis has been a major topic of investigation by some of the leading experimenters and theorists of each generation. Today hypnosis is emerging again as a lively area of research within cognitive (systems level) neuroscience informing (...)
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  17. Graham A. Jamieson & Harutomo Hasegawa (2007). New Paradigms of Hypnosis Research. In Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 133-144.
  18. Graham A. Jamieson (2007). Previews and Prospects for the Cognitive Neuroscience of Hypnosis and Conscious States. In Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 1-11.
  19. David Spiegel (2005). Multileveling the Playing Field: Altering Our State of Consciousness to Understand Hypnosis: Comment. Contemporary Hypnosis 22 (1):31-33.
     
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  20.  59
    Pierre Rainville, Rrrobert K. Hofbauer, M. Catherine Bushnell, Gary H. Duncan & Donald D. Price (2002). Hypnosis Modulates Activity in Brain Structures Involved in the Regulation of Consciousness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 14 (6):887-901.
  21.  37
    Tim Bayne (2007). Hypnosis and the Unity of Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press
    Hypnosis appears to generate unusual—and sometimes even astonishing—changes in the contents of consciousness. Hypnotic subjects report perceiving things that are not there, they report not perceiving things that are there, and they report unusual alterations in the phenomenology of agency. In addition to apparent alterations in the contents of consciousness, hypnosis also appears to involve alterations in the structure of consciousness. According to many theorists—most notably Hilgard—hypnosis demonstrates that the unity of consciousness is an illusion (Hilgard 1977).
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  22.  5
    David Rosenhan & Perry London (1963). Hypnosis in the Unhypnotizable: A Study in Rote Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (1):30.
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  23.  4
    B. Jack White, Richard D. Alter, Mark E. Snow & D. Eugene Thorne (1968). Use of Instructions and Hypnosis to Minimize Anchor Effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):415.
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  24.  4
    A. Jenness & R. C. Hackman (1938). Salivary Secretion During Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (1):58.
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  25.  2
    J. P. Das (1958). Conditioning and Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (2):110.
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  26.  2
    F. W. Hibler (1940). An Experimental Investigation of Negative After-Images of Hallucinated Colors in Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (1):45.
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  27.  3
    J. W. Nygard (1939). Cerebral Circulation Prevailing During Sleep and Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (1):1.
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  28. Joseph Margolis & Clorinda G. Margolis (1979). The Theory of Hypnosis and the Concept of Persons. Behaviorism 7 (2):97-111.
  29. Imants Baruss (2003). Hypnosis. In Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association 107-133.
     
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  30. Fulvio Marone (2002). Suggestions From the Unconscious: Freud, Hypnosis, and the Mind-Body Problem. In Gertrudis Van de Vijver & Filip Geerardyn (eds.), The Pre-Psychoanalytic Writings of Sigmund Freud. Karnac Books 226-232.
  31.  2
    Vince Polito, Amanda J. Barnier & Erik Z. Woody (2013). Developing the Sense of Agency Rating Scale (SOARS): An Empirical Measure of Agency Disruption in Hypnosis. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):684-696.
    Two experiments report on the construction of the Sense of Agency Rating Scale (SOARS), a new measure for quantifying alterations to agency. In Experiment 1, 370 participants completed a preliminary version of the scale following hypnosis. Factor analysis revealed two underlying factors: Involuntariness and Effortlessness. In Experiment 2, this two factor structure was confirmed in a sample of 113 low, medium and high hypnotisable participants. The two factors, Involuntariness and Effortlessness, correlated significantly with hypnotisability and pass rates for ideomotor, challenge (...)
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  32.  6
    William J. McGeown, Annalena Venneri, Irving Kirsch, Luca Nocetti, Kathrine Roberts, Lisa Foan & Giuliana Mazzoni (2012). Suggested Visual Hallucination Without Hypnosis Enhances Activity in Visual Areas of the Brain. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):100-116.
    This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study investigated high and low suggestible people responding to two visual hallucination suggestions with and without a hypnotic induction. Participants in the study were asked to see color while looking at a grey image, and to see shades of grey while looking at a color image. High suggestible participants reported successful alterations in color perception in both tasks, both in and out of hypnosis, and showed a small benefit if hypnosis was induced. Low suggestible people (...)
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  33.  11
    David A. Oakley & Peter W. Halligan (2011). Using Hypnosis to Gain Insights Into Healthy and Pathological Cognitive Functioning. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):328-331.
    The demonstration that hypnotic suggestion can inhibit word/colour Stroop highlights one of the benefits of using hypnosis to explore cognitive psychology and in particular attentional processes. The compelling results using a rigorous design have particular relevance for the presumed automaticity of some forms of information processing. Moreover the results support the potential that hypnotic suggestion offers for creating clinically informed analogues of relevant psychological and neuropsychological conditions. As with all novel research, the results of Raz and Campbell raise further operational (...)
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  34.  7
    Michael H. Connors, Amanda J. Barnier, Robyn Langdon, Rochelle E. Cox, Vince Polito & Max Coltheart (2013). A Laboratory Analogue of Mirrored-Self Misidentification Delusion: The Role of Hypnosis, Suggestion, and Demand Characteristics. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1510-1522.
    Mirrored-self misidentification is the delusional belief that one's own reflection in the mirror is a stranger. In two experiments, we tested the ability of hypnotic suggestion to model this condition. In Experiment 1, we compared two suggestions based on either the delusion's surface features (seeing a stranger in the mirror) or underlying processes (impaired face processing). Fifty-two high hypnotisable participants received one of these suggestions either with hypnosis or without in a wake control. In Experiment 2, we examined the extent (...)
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  35.  7
    Giuliana Mazzoni, Elisabetta Rotriquenz, Claudia Carvalho, Manila Vannucci, Kathrine Roberts & Irving Kirsch (2009). Suggested Visual Hallucinations in and Out of Hypnosis. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):494-499.
    We administered suggestions to see a gray-scale pattern as colored and a colored pattern in shades of gray to 30 high suggestible and eight low suggestible students. The suggestions were administered twice, once following the induction of hypnosis and once without an induction. Besides rating the degree of color they saw in the stimuli differently, participants also rated their states of consciousness as normal, relaxed, hypnotized, or deeply hypnotized. Reports of being hypnotized were limited to highly suggestible participants and only (...)
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  36.  4
    Graham A. Jamieson & Erik Woody (2007). Dissociated Control as a Paradigm for Cognitive Neuroscience Research and Theorizing in Hypnosis. In Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 111--132.
  37.  32
    Peter L. N. Naish (2010). Hypnosis and Hemispheric Asymmetry. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):230-234.
    Participants of low and high hypnotic susceptibility were tested on a temporal order judgement task, both with and without hypnosis. Judgements were made of the order of presentation of light flashes appearing in first one hemi-field then the other. There were differences in the inter-stimulus intervals required accurately to report the order, depending upon which hemi-field led. This asymmetry was most marked in hypnotically susceptible participants and reversed when they were hypnotised. This implies not only that brain activity changes in (...)
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  38.  4
    Alison Winter (2013). The Rise and Fall of Forensic Hypnosis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (1):26-35.
    This paper examines the fortunes of the controversial use of hypnosis to ‘enhance’ autobiographical memories in postwar America. From the 1950s through the early 1980s, hypnosis became increasingly popular as a means to exhume information thought to be buried within the mind. This practice was encouraged by lay understandings of memory drawn from a material culture full of new recording devices ; and during the years when the practice was becoming most popular and accepted, academic psychologists developed a contrary, reconstructive, (...)
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  39.  19
    Michael I. Posner & Mary K. Rothbart (2011). Brain States and Hypnosis Research. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):325-327.
    Research in cognitive neuroscience now considers the state of the brain prior to the task an important aspect of performance. Hypnosis seems to alter the brain state in a way which allows external input to dominate over internal goals. We examine how normal development may illuminate the hypnotic state.
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  40.  15
    David A. Oakley (1999). Hypnosis and Consciousness: A Structural Model. Contemporary Hypnosis 16:215-223.
  41.  20
    Balaganesh Gandhi & David A. Oakley (2005). Does 'Hypnosis' by Any Other Name Smell as Sweet? The Efficacy of 'Hypnotic' Inductions Depends on the Label 'Hypnosis'. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):304-315.
    Hypnosis is associated with profound changes in conscious experience and is increasingly used as a cognitive tool to explore neuropsychological processes. Studies of this sort typically employ suggestions following a hypnotic induction to produce changes in perceptual experience and motor control. It is not clear, however, to what extent the induction procedure serves to facilitate suggested phenomena. This study investigated the effect on suggestibility of a hypnotic induction and labelling that procedure ‘hypnosis.’ Suggestibility of participants was tested before and after (...)
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  42. Graham A. Jamieson & Woody & Erik (2007). Dissociated Control as a Paradigm for Cognitive Neuroscience Research and Theorizing in Hypnosis. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. OUP Oxford
     
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  43. Graham A. Jamieson & Hasegawa & Harutomo (2007). New Paradigms of Hypnosis Research. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. OUP Oxford
     
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  44. Tobias Egner & Raz & Amir (2007). Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. OUP Oxford
     
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  45.  42
    J. O. Beahrs (1983). Co-Consciousness: A Common Denominator in Hypnosis, Multiple Personality, and Normalcy. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 26:100-13.
  46.  25
    Billie S. Strauss (1986). Hypnosis: Major Theoretical Orientations and Issues. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 6 (1):47-48.
    Hypnosis is neither a theory nor a therapy, but a psychological process which can be explained using a variety of theoretical perspectives and which can be incorporated into various conceptual schools of therapy. Like the proverbial three men and elephant, different theories of hypnosis emphasize its different facets. Various theories of personality, development, and behavior have described and explained different aspects of hypnosis. Current issues in the literature on hypnosis include hypnosis and memory and cognitive processes, hypnotic susceptibility, interface between (...)
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  47. A. Alexander, A. Andrew, Kallio Sakari & Revonsuo Antti (2007). Hypnosis Induces a Changed Composition of Brain Oscillations in EEG: A Case Study. Contemporary Hypnosis 24 (1):3-18.
     
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  48. Ronald J. Pekala & V. K. Kumar (1989). Phenomenological Patterns of Consciousness During Hypnosis: Relevance to Cognition and Individual Differences. Australian Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis 17:1-20.
     
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  49.  6
    Graham A. Iamieson & Harutomo Hasegavva (2007). New Paradigms of Hypnosis Research. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 133.
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  50.  18
    Irving Kirsch & Steven Jay Lynn (2004). Hypnosis and Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):667-668.
    Although we are sympathetic to his central thesis about the illusion of will, having previously advanced a similar proposal, Wegner's account of hypnosis is flawed. Hypnotic behavior derives from specific suggestions that are given, rather than from the induction, of trance, and it can be observed in 90% of the population. Thus, it is very pertinent to the illusion of will. However, Wegner exaggerates the loss of subjective will in hypnosis.
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