Search results for 'Hypnosis*' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tim Bayne (2007). Hypnosis and the Unity of Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 93-109.score: 21.0
    Hypnosis appears to generate unusual—and sometimes even astonishing—changes in the contents of consciousness. Hypnotic subjects report perceiving things that are not there, they report not perceiving things that are there, and they report unusual alterations in the phenomenology of agency. In addition to apparent alterations in the contents of consciousness, hypnosis also appears to involve alterations in the structure of consciousness. According to many theorists—most notably Hilgard—hypnosis demonstrates that the unity of consciousness is an illusion (Hilgard 1977).
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  2. Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). HYPNOSIS INDUCES A CHANGED COMPOSITION OF BRAIN OSCILLATIONS IN EEG: A CASE STUDY. Contemporary Hypnosis 24 (1):3-18.score: 21.0
    Cognitive functions associated with the frontal lobes of the brain may be specifi cally involved in hypnosis. Thus, the frontal area of the brain has recently been of great interest when searching for neural changes associated with hypnosis. We tested the hypothesis that EEG during pure hypnosis would differ from the normal non-hypnotic EEG especially above the frontal area of the brain. The composition of brain oscillations was examined in a broad frequency band (130 Hz) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) of (...)
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  3. Zoltán Dienes & Josef Perner (2007). Executive Control Without Conscious Awareness: The Cold Control Theory of Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 293-314.score: 18.0
  4. John Gruzelier (2005). Altered States of Consciousness and Hypnosis in the Twenty-First Century: Comment. Contemporary Hypnosis 22 (1):1-7.score: 18.0
  5. Graham A. Jamieson (ed.) (2007). Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    The phenomenon of hypnosis provides a rich paradigm for those seeking to understand the processes that underlie consciousness. Understanding hypnosis tells us about a basic human capacity for altered experiences that is often overlooked in contemporary western societies. Throughout the 200 year history of psychology, hypnosis has been a major topic of investigation by some of the leading experimenters and theorists of each generation. Today hypnosis is emerging again as a lively area of research within cognitive (systems level) neuroscience informing (...)
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  6. Pierre Rainville & Donald D. Price (2003). Hypnosis Phenomenology and the Neurobiology of Consciousness. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis 51 (2):105-29.score: 18.0
  7. John F. Kihlstrom (2005). Is Hypnosis an Altered State of Consciousness or What?: Comment. Contemporary Hypnosis 22 (1):34-38.score: 18.0
  8. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Cortex Functional Connectivity as a Neurophysiological Correlate of Hypnosis: An EEG Case Study. Neuropsychologia 45 (7):14521462.score: 18.0
    Cortex functional connectivity associated with hypnosis was investigated in a single highly hypnotizable subject in a normal baseline condition and under neutral hypnosis during two sessions separated by a year. After the hypnotic induction, but without further suggestions as compared to the baseline condition, all studied parameters of local and remote functional connectivity were significantly changed. The significant differences between hypnosis and the baseline condition were observable (to different extent) in five studied independent frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and (...)
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  9. Ernest L. Rossi & Kathryn L. Rossi (2006). The Neuroscience of Observing Consciousness & Mirror Neurons in Therapeutic Hypnosis. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 48 (4):263-278.score: 18.0
  10. Erik Woody & Henry Szechtman (2007). To See Feelingly: Emotion, Motivation, and Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 241-255.score: 18.0
  11. Adrian Burgess (2007). On the Contribution of Neurophysiology to Hypnosis Research: Current State and Future Directions. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 195-219.score: 18.0
  12. Amir Raz Michael Lifshitz, Emma P. Cusumano (2013). Hypnosis as Neurophenomenology. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Hypnosis research binds phenomenology and neuroscience. Here we show how recent evidence probing the impact of hypnosis and suggestion can inform and advance a neurophenomenological approach. In contrast to meditative practices that involve lengthy and intensive training, hypnosis induces profound alterations in subjective experience following just a few words of suggestion. Individuals highly responsive to hypnosis can quickly and effortlessly manifest atypical conscious experiences as well as override deeply entrenched processes. These capacities open new avenues for suspending habitual modes of (...)
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  13. Peter L. N. Naish (2007). Time Distortion, and the Nature of Hypnosis and Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 271-292.score: 18.0
  14. Marco Sambin Arianna Palmieri, Johann Roland Kleinbub, Vincenzo Calvo, Gianni Sorarù, Irene Grasso, Irene Messina (2012). Efficacy of Hypnosis-Based Treatment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Pilot Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and its devastating neurodegenerative consequences have an inevitably psychological impact on patients and their caregivers: however, although it would be strongly needed, there is a lack of research on the efficacy of psychological intervention. Our aim was to investigate the effect of hypnosis-based intervention on psychological and perceived physical wellbeing in patients and the indirect effect on caregivers. Methods: We recruited 8 ALS volunteers patients as a pilot sample for an hypnosis intervention and self-hypnosis training (...)
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  15. Tobias Egner & Amir Raz (2007). Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 29-50.score: 18.0
  16. Graham A. Jamieson & Harutomo Hasegawa (2007). New Paradigms of Hypnosis Research. In , Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 133-144.score: 18.0
  17. Graham A. Jamieson (2007). Previews and Prospects for the Cognitive Neuroscience of Hypnosis and Conscious States. In , Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 1-11.score: 18.0
  18. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 145-165.score: 18.0
     
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  19. Ronald J. Pekala & V. K. Kumar (2007). An Empirical-Phenomenological Approach to Quantifying Consciousness and States of Consciousness: With Particular Reference to Understanding the Nature of Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 167-194.score: 18.0
     
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  20. David Spiegel (2005). Multileveling the Playing Field: Altering Our State of Consciousness to Understand Hypnosis: Comment. Contemporary Hypnosis 22 (1):31-33.score: 18.0
     
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  21. Pierre Rainville, Rrrobert K. Hofbauer, M. Catherine Bushnell, Gary H. Duncan & Donald D. Price (2002). Hypnosis Modulates Activity in Brain Structures Involved in the Regulation of Consciousness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 14 (6):887-901.score: 15.0
  22. Brian R. Vandenberg (2010). Evidence, Ontology, and Psychological Science: The Lesson of Hypnosis. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 30 (1):51-65.score: 15.0
  23. Ophelia Deroy & Charles Spence (2013). Training, Hypnosis, and Drugs: Artificial Synaesthesia, or Artificial Paradises? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
    The last few years have seen the publication of a number of studies by researchers claiming to have induced “synaesthesia”, “pseudo-synaesthesia”, or “synaesthesia-like” phenomena in non-synaesthetic participants. Although the intention of these studies has been to try and shed light on the way in which synaesthesia might have been acquired in developmental synaesthestes, we argue that they may only have documented a phenomenon that has elsewhere been accounted for in terms of the acquisition of sensory associations and is not evidently (...)
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  24. David Rosenhan & Perry London (1963). Hypnosis in the Unhypnotizable: A Study in Rote Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (1):30.score: 15.0
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  25. A. Jenness & R. C. Hackman (1938). Salivary Secretion During Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (1):58.score: 15.0
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  26. Joseph Margolis & Clorinda G. Margolis (1979). The Theory of Hypnosis and the Concept of Persons. Behaviorism 7:97-111.score: 15.0
  27. J. W. Nygard (1939). Cerebral Circulation Prevailing During Sleep and Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (1):1.score: 15.0
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  28. B. Jack White, Richard D. Alter, Mark E. Snow & D. Eugene Thorne (1968). Use of Instructions and Hypnosis to Minimize Anchor Effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):415.score: 15.0
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  29. Imants Baruss (2003). Hypnosis. In , Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association. 107-133.score: 15.0
     
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  30. J. P. Das (1958). Conditioning and Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (2):110.score: 15.0
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  31. F. W. Hibler (1940). An Experimental Investigation of Negative After-Images of Hallucinated Colors in Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (1):45.score: 15.0
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  32. Fulvio Marone (2002). Suggestions From the Unconscious: Freud, Hypnosis, and the Mind-Body Problem. In Gertrudis Van de Vijver & Filip Geerardyn (eds.), The Pre-Psychoanalytic Writings of Sigmund Freud. Karnac Books. 226-232.score: 15.0
  33. J. O. Beahrs (1983). Co-Consciousness: A Common Denominator in Hypnosis, Multiple Personality, and Normalcy. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 26:100-13.score: 12.0
  34. Irving Kirsch & Steven Jay Lynn (2004). Hypnosis and Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):667-668.score: 12.0
    Although we are sympathetic to his central thesis about the illusion of will, having previously advanced a similar proposal, Wegner's account of hypnosis is flawed. Hypnotic behavior derives from specific suggestions that are given, rather than from the induction, of trance, and it can be observed in 90% of the population. Thus, it is very pertinent to the illusion of will. However, Wegner exaggerates the loss of subjective will in hypnosis.
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  35. David A. Oakley (1999). Hypnosis and Consciousness: A Structural Model. Contemporary Hypnosis 16:215-223.score: 12.0
  36. Graham A. Iamieson & Harutomo Hasegavva (2007). New Paradigms of Hypnosis Research. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 133.score: 12.0
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  37. Graham A. Jamieson & Erik Woody (2007). Dissociated Control as a Paradigm for Cognitive Neuroscience Research and Theorizing in Hypnosis. In , Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 111--132.score: 12.0
  38. W. Ray (2007). The Experience of Agency and Hypnosis From an Evolutionary Perspective. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 223--240.score: 12.0
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  39. Graham A. Jamieson & Hasegawa & Harutomo (2007). New Paradigms of Hypnosis Research. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oup Oxford.score: 12.0
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  40. Ernest R. Hilgard (1979). Consciousness and Control: Lessons From Hypnosis. Australian Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis 7:103-15.score: 12.0
     
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  41. Graham A. Jamieson (2007). Previews and Prospects for the Cognitive Neuroscience of Hypnosis. In , Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 12.0
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  42. Ronald J. Pekala & Kumar & K. V. (2007). An Empirical-Phenomenological Approach to Quantifying Consciousness and States of Consciousness: With Particular Reference to Understanding the Nature of Hypnosis. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oup Oxford.score: 12.0
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  43. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Lilienfeld & O. Scott (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oup Oxford.score: 12.0
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  44. Ti M. Bayne (2007). Hypnosis and the Unity. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 93.score: 12.0
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  45. Ronald J. Pekala & V. K. Kumar (1989). Phenomenological Patterns of Consciousness During Hypnosis: Relevance to Cognition and Individual Differences. Australian Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis 17:1-20.score: 12.0
     
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  46. Zoltan Dienes & Perner & Josef (2007). Executive Control Without Conscious Awareness: The Cold Control Theory of Hypnosis. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oup Oxford.score: 12.0
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  47. William J. Ray (2007). The Experience of Consciousnesss and Hypnosis From an Evolutionary Perspective. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oup Oxford.score: 12.0
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  48. Tobias Egner & Raz & Amir (2007). Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oup Oxford.score: 12.0
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  49. Irving Kirsch Steven Jay Lynn, Oliver Fassler Josh Knox & O. Lilienfeld Scott (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience : Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
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