Search results for 'Hyungseung Chop' (try it on Scholar)

16 found
Sort by:
  1. E. Cline (1995). Here Comes a Chopper to Chop Off Your Head-Freedom of Expression Vs Censorship in America. Journal of Information Ethics 4 (2):18-32.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John Hawthorne & Brian Weatherson (2004). Chopping Up Gunk. The Monist 87 (3):339-50.score: 5.0
    We show that someone who believes in both gunk and the possibility of supertasks has to give up either a plausible principle about where gunk can be located, or plausible conservation principles.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Charles P. Ordahl & Brian A. Williams (1998). Knowing Chops From Chuck: Roasting MyoD Redundancy. Bioessays 20 (5):357-362.score: 5.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Dong-Hee Shin & Hyungseung Choo (2012). Modeling the Acceptance of Socially Interactive Robotics: Social Presence in Humanrobot Interaction. Interaction Studies 12 (3):430-460.score: 3.0
    Based on an integrated theoretical framework, this study analyzes user acceptance behavior toward socially interactive robots focusing on the variables that influence the users' attitudes and intentions to adopt robots. Individuals' responses to questions about attitude and intention to use robots were collected and analyzed according to different factors modified from a variety of theories. The results of the proposed model explain that social presence is key to the behavioral intention to accept social robots. The proposed model shows the significant (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Michał Walicki, Marc Bezem & Wojtek Szajnkenig (2009). Developing Bounded Reasoning. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 18 (1):97-129.score: 3.0
    We introduce a three-tiered framework for modelling and reasoning about agents who (i) can use possibly complete reasoning systems without any restrictions but who nevertheless are (ii) bounded in the sense that they never reach infinitely many results and, finally, who (iii) perform their reasoning in time. This last aspect does not concern so much the time it takes for agents to actually carry out their reasoning, as the time which can bring about external changes in the agents’ states such (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Selmer Bringsjord, The Town of Brunswick's Contrarian Planning.score: 3.0
    I have a friend, Harry, quite an odd bird, who calls himself a ``contrarian" planner; I recently learned that Harry has been advising the Town of Brunswick in connection with a developer's proposal to chop a new road from WalMart to Rt 2. I called him about this prospective deal the other day; what follows is a transcript of our conversation.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeffrey A. Gray & Nunn J. Chopping S. (2002). Implications of Synaesthesia for Functionalism: Theory and Experiments. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (12):5-31.score: 1.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Crawford L. Elder (2001). Mental Causation Versus Physical Causation: No Contest. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):110-127.score: 1.0
    James decides that the best price today on pork chops is at Supermarket S, then James makes driving motions for twenty minutes, then James’ car enters the parking lot at Supermarket S. Common sense supposes that the stages in this sequence may be causally connected, and that the pattern is commonplace: James’ belief (together with his desire for pork chops) causes bodily behavior, and the behavior causes a change in James’ whereabouts. Anyone committed to the idea that beliefs and desires (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Bryan Frances, An Utterly Brilliant Solution to the Semantic Paradoxes?score: 1.0
    There is a certain approach to the semantic paradoxes that is highly intuitive and for that reason alone never seems to go away. Roughly put, it's the idea that the paradoxical sentences just don't really have any truth conditions at all, no matter how grammatically sound and meaningful they and their parts are. I suppose that just about anyone who spends even a relatively modest amount of time thinking about the paradoxes comes up with this idea eventually. There is a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Andrea M. Weisberger (2007). The Argument From Evil. In Michael Martin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Atheism. Cambridge.score: 1.0
    Where was God? Where was the intelligent designer of the universe when 1.5 million children were turned into smoke by zealous Nazis? Where was the all powerful, all knowing, wholly good being whose very essence is radically opposed to evil, while millions of children were starved to death by Stalin, had their limbs chopped off with machetes in Rwanda, were turned into amputees by the diamond trade in Sierra Leone, and worked to death, even now, by the child slave trade (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Crawford L. Elder (2003). Destruction, Alteration, Simples and World Stuff. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (210):24–38.score: 1.0
    When a tree is chopped to bits, or a sweater unravelled, its matter still exists. Since antiquity, it has sometimes been inferred that nothing really has been destroyed: what has happened is just that this matter has assumed new form. Contemporary versions hold that apparent destruction of a familiar object is just rearrangement of microparticles or of 'physical simples' or 'world stuff'. But if destruction of a familiar object is genuinely to be reduced to mere alteration of something else, we (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Chris Fraser, School of Names. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 1.0
    The “School of Names” ming jia ) is the traditional Chinese label for a diverse group of Warring States (479-221 B.C.) thinkers who shared an interest in language, disputation, and metaphysics. They were notorious for logic-chopping, purportedly idle conceptual puzzles, and paradoxes such as “Today go to Yue but arrive yesterday” and “A white horse is not a horse.” Because reflection on language in ancient China centered on “names”.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Bruce Bridgeman (2002). Artifacts and Cognition: Evolution or Cultural Progress? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):403-403.score: 1.0
    Lack of symmetry of stone tools does not require that hominids making asymmetric tools are incapable of doing better. By analogy, differences between stone tools of early humans and modern technology arose without genetic change. A conservative assumption is that symmetry of stone artifacts may have arisen simply because symmetrical tools work better when used for striking and chopping rather than scraping.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. K. Vaux (1999). Law and Lamb: AKEDAH and the Search for a Deep Religious Symbol for an Ecumenical Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 5 (3):213-219.score: 1.0
    This essay looks at the concept of AKEDAH, the essence of which is the travail of the human condition and the trust in vindication and victory, as a salient and deep metaphor for bioethics. The author first delineates the symbol, then shows its theological and ethical significance, and finally suggests its bioethical applications. The LORD said, “Go get Isaac, your only son, the one you dearly love! Take him to the land of Moriah, and I will show you a mountain (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ashley D. Hairston (2013). Momma Taught Us to Keep a Clean House. Continent 3 (2):66-69.score: 1.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Joe Gray, Susan Chopping, Julia Nunn, David Parslow, Lloyd Gregory, Steve Williams, Michael J. Brammer & Simon Baron-Cohen (2002). Implications of Synaesthesia for Functionalism: Theory and Experiments. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (12):5-31.score: 1.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation