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  1. I. Bamforth (2004). Can Frankenstein Be Read as an Early Research Ethics Text? Medical Humanities 30 (2):106-106.
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  2. I. Bamforth (2004). Pickled Essence of Englishman: Thomas Lovell Beddoes--Time to Unearth a Neglected Poet? Medical Humanities 30 (1):36-40.
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  3. I. Bamforth (2002). Knock: A Study in Medical Cynicism. Medical Humanities 28 (1):14-18.
    French literature has shown an enduring fascination with the social figure of the doctor. In Jules Romains' amusing play Knock (1922), and in its later film version (1951), the doctor as deceiver returns to centrestage with a flourish. Molière's seventeenth-century figures were mostly quacks and mountebanks; Knock is something new: he is a health messiah. By enforcing a mental and social hygiene based on fear, Knock brings a small rural population under his sway. Insouciance is banished by artful consciousness-raising. A (...)
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  4. I. Bamforth (2000). Kafka's Uncle: Scenes From a World of Trust Infected by Suspicion. Medical Humanities 26 (2):85-91.
    What happens when we heed a call? Few writers have been as suspicious of their vocation as Franz Kafka (1883–1924). His story, A Country Doctor, (1919) ostensibly about a night visit to a patient that goes badly wrong, suggests a modern writer's journey to the heart of his work. There he discovers that trust, like the tradition which might sustain him, is blighted. This essay also examines Kafka's attitude to illness and the medical profession, and his close relationship with his (...)
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