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  1. I. Glenn Cohen, The Right Not to Be a Genetic Parent?
    Should the law recognize an individual's right not to be a genetic parent when genetic parenthood does not carry with it legal or gestational parenthood? If so, should we allow individuals to waive that right in advance, either by contract or a less formal means? How should the law's treatment of gestational and legal parenthood inform these questions? Developments in reproductive technology have brought these questions to the fore, most prominently in the preembryo disposition cases a number of courts have (...)
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  2. I. Glenn Cohen, Alice Dreger & Theodore Friedmann (forthcoming). Thomas H. Murray is President. Hastings Center Report.
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  3. I. Glenn Cohen & Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Lisa Campo-Engelstein is an As. Hastings Center Report.
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  4. I. Glenn Cohen (2014). A Fuller Picture of Organ Markets. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (10):19-21.
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  5. Holly Fernandez Lynch & I. Glenn Cohen (2014). Streamlining Review by Accepting Equivalence. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):11-13.
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  6. I. Glenn Cohen (2013). Conscientious Objection, Coercion, the Affordable Care Act, and US States. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1):163-186.
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  7. I. Glenn Cohen (2013). Of Modest Proposals and Non-Identity: A Comment on the Right to Know Your Genetic Parents. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):45-47.
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  8. I. Glenn Cohen (2013). Transplant Tourism: The Ethics and Regulation of International Markets for Organs. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):269-285.
    “Medical Tourism” is the travel of residents of one country to another country for treatment. In this article I focus on travel abroad to purchase organs for transplant, what I will call “Transplant Tourism.” With the exception of Iran, organ sale is illegal across the globe, but many destination countries have thriving black markets, either due to their willful failure to police the practice or more good faith lack of resources to detect it. I focus on the sale of kidneys, (...)
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  9. I. Glenn Cohen, Charles A. Czeisler & Christopher P. Landrigan (2013). Making Residency Work Hour Rules Work. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):310-314.
    In July 2011, the ACGME implemented new rules that limit interns to 16 hours of work in a row, but continue to allow 2nd-year and higher resident physicians to work for up to 28 consecutive hours. Whether the ACGME's 2011 work hour limits went too far or did not go far enough has been hotly debated. In this article, we do not seek to re-open the debate about whether these standards get matters exactly right. Instead, we wish to address the (...)
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  10. Jonathan Will, Eli Y. Adashi & I. Glenn Cohen (2013). When Potential Does Not Matter: What Developments in Cellular Biology Tell Us About the Concept of Legal Personhood. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):38-40.
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  11. I. Glenn Cohen (2012). How to Regulate Medical Tourism (and Why It Matters for Bioethics). Developing World Bioethics 12 (1):9-20.
    A growing literature examines descriptive and normative questions about medical tourism such as: How does it operate? What are its effects? Are home country patients or their governments failing in moral duties by engaging in or permitting medical tourism?By contrast, much less has been written on the regulatory dimension: What might be done about medical tourism if we were convinced that it posed ethical issues and were motivated to act? I shall argue that this kind of regulatory analysis is essential (...)
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  12. I. Glenn Cohen (2011). Prohibiting Anonymous Sperm Donation and the Child Welfare Error. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):13-14.
    Should anonymous sperm “donation”—a misnomer, since sperm is usually purchased—be permitted? A number of countries, including Sweden, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Norway, New Zealand, and several Australian states, have answered no.1 The United Kingdom recently joined this list, instituting a system whereby new sperm (and egg) donors must put information into a registry, and a donor-conceived child “is entitled to request and receive their donor’s name and last known address, once they reach the age of 18.”2 The arguments offered (...)
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  13. I. Glenn Cohen & Sadath Sayeed (2011). Fetal Pain, Abortion, Viability, and the Constitution. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):235-242.
    In early 2010, the Nebraska state legislature passed a new abortion restricting law asserting a new, compelling state interest in preventing fetal pain. In this article, we review existing constitutional abortion doctrine and note difficulties presented by persistent legal attention to a socially derived viability construct. We then offer a substantive biological, ethical, and legal critique of the new fetal pain rationale.
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  14. I. Glenn Cohen (2010). Medical Tourism: The View From Ten Thousand Feet. Hastings Center Report 40 (2):11-12.
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  15. I. Glenn Cohen (2000). Administrative Developments: New Human Subject Research Guidelines for IRBs. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics: A Journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):305.
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  16. I. Glenn Cohen (2000). American Journal of Law & Medicine and Harvard Law & Health Care Society. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):305-318.
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