Search results for 'I. Martineau' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. E. Martineau (1986). Le Coeur de l'Alètheia in Heidegger Et les Grecs (I). Revue de Philosophie Ancienne 4 (1):33-86.score: 360.0
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  2. D. Blondeau, M. Lavoie, P. Valois, E. W. Keyserlingk, M. Hébert & I. Martineau (2000). The Attitude of Canadian Nurses Towards Advance Directives. Nursing Ethics 7 (5):399-411.score: 240.0
    This article seeks to shed light on the beliefs that influence nurses’ intention of respecting or not respecting an advance directive document, namely a living will or a durable power of attorney. Nurses’ beliefs were measured using a 44-statement questionnaire. The sample was made up of 306 nurses working either in a long-term care centre or in a hospital centre offering general and specialized care in the province of Québec. The results indicate that nurses have a strong intention of complying (...)
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  3. Karen Stohr (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Contemporary Virtue Ethics. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):102-107.score: 24.0
    Virtue ethics is now well established as a substantive, independent normative theory. It was not always so. The revival of virtue ethics was initially spurred by influential criticisms of other normative theories, especially those made by Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, John McDowell, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Bernard Williams. 1 Because of this heritage, virtue ethics is often associated with anti-theory movements in ethics and more recently, moral particularism. There are, however, quite a few different approaches to ethics that can reasonably claim (...)
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  4. Mary Jo Deegan (2003). Textbooks, the History of Sociology, and the Sociological Stock of Knowledge. Sociological Theory 21 (3):298-305.score: 24.0
    Textbooks increasingly reflect changes in our sociological stock of knowledge about the founders of the discipline. Richard Hamilton is unaware of this research and its documentation of the flaws in earlier accounts of the history of the profession. In an effort to expand his disciplinary understanding, I briefly review the extensive scholarship on the sociology of Harriet Martineau which has been published over the last quarter of a century.
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