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Ibo van de Poel [17]I. van de Poel [3]I. R. van de Poel [1]
  1. Evan Selinger, Don Ihde, Ibo van de Poel, Martin Peterson & Peter-Paul Verbeek (2014). Erratum To: Book Symposium on Peter Paul Verbeek's Moralizing Technology: Understanding and Designing the Morality of Things. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):315-315.
    Erratum to: Philos. Technol.DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0054-3The original version of this article was inadvertently published with an incorrect title, author group and layout. The corrected version was published in Philos. Technol. (2012) 25:605–631 (DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0058-z).
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  2. Ibo van de Poel (2013). Why New Technologies Should Be Conceived as Social Experiments. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):352-355.
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  3. Neelke Doorn & Ibo van de Poel (2012). Editors' Overview: Moral Responsibility in Technology and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):1-11.
    Editors’ Overview: Moral Responsibility in Technology and Engineering Content Type Journal Article Category Original Paper Pages 1-11 DOI 10.1007/s11948-011-9285-z Authors Neelke Doorn, Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5015, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands Ibo van de Poel, Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5015, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands Journal Science and Engineering Ethics Online ISSN 1471-5546 Print ISSN 1353-3452 Journal Volume Volume 18 Journal Issue Volume 18, (...)
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  4. J. Fahlquist & I. van de Poel (2012). Technology and Parental Responsibility: The Case of the V-Chip. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):285-300.
    In this paper, the so-called V-chip is analysed from the perspective of responsibility. The V-chip is a technological tool used by parents, on a voluntary basis, to prevent children from watching violent television content. Since 1997 in the United States, the V-chip is installed in all new televisions sets of 12″ and larger. We are interested in the question whether and how the introduction of the V-chip affects who is to be considered responsible for children. In the debate, it has (...)
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  5. I. van de Poel (2012). Technology and Parental Responsibility: The Case of the V-Chip. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):285-300.
    In this paper, the so-called V-chip is analysed from the perspective of responsibility. The V-chip is a technological tool used by parents, on a voluntary basis, to prevent children from watching violent television content. Since 1997 in the United States, the V-chip is installed in all new televisions sets of 12″ and larger. We are interested in the question whether and how the introduction of the V-chip affects who is to be considered responsible for children. In the debate, it has (...)
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  6. Ibo van de Poel, Jessica Nihlén Fahlquist, Neelke Doorn, Sjoerd Zwart & Lambèr Royakkers (2012). The Problem of Many Hands: Climate Change as an Example. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):49-67.
    In some situations in which undesirable collective effects occur, it is very hard, if not impossible, to hold any individual reasonably responsible. Such a situation may be referred to as the problem of many hands. In this paper we investigate how the problem of many hands can best be understood and why, and when, it exactly constitutes a problem. After analyzing climate change as an example, we propose to define the problem of many hands as the occurrence of a gap (...)
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  7. Ibo van de Poel, Jessica Nihlén Fahlquist, Neelke Doorn, Sjoerd Zwart & Lambèr Royakkers (2012). The Problem of Many Hands: Climate Change as an Example. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):49-67.
    In some situations in which undesirable collective effects occur, it is very hard, if not impossible, to hold any individual reasonably responsible. Such a situation may be referred to as the problem of many hands. In this paper we investigate how the problem of many hands can best be understood and why, and when, it exactly constitutes a problem. After analyzing climate change as an example, we propose to define the problem of many hands as the occurrence of a gap (...)
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  8. Jeroen van den Hoven, Gert-Jan Lokhorst & Ibo van de Poel (2012). Engineering and the Problem of Moral Overload. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):143-155.
    When thinking about ethics, technology is often only mentioned as the source of our problems, not as a potential solution to our moral dilemmas. When thinking about technology, ethics is often only mentioned as a constraint on developments, not as a source and spring of innovation. In this paper, we argue that ethics can be the source of technological development rather than just a constraint and technological progress can create moral progress rather than just moral problems. We show this by (...)
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  9. Ibo van de Poel (2011). Ethics, Technology, and Engineering: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Featuring a unique systematic approach to dealing with ethical problems known as the 'ethical cycle, ' the book utilizes an abundance of real-life case studies ...
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  10. Ibo van de Poel (2011). Nuclear Energy as a Social Experiment. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (3):285 - 290.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 3, Page 285-290, October 2011.
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  11. Nicole Vincent, Ibo van de Poel & Jeroen van den Hoven (eds.) (2011). Moral Responsibility: Beyond Free Will and Determinism. Springer.
    This book'¬"s chapters deal with a range of theoretical problems discussed in classic compatibilist literature '¬ ; e.g. the relationship between ...
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  12. Johannes Jacobs, Ibo van de Poel & Patricia Osseweijer (2010). Sunscreens with Titanium Dioxide (TiO 2 ) Nano-Particles: A Societal Experiment. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 4 (2):103-113.
    The risks of novel technologies, such as nano(bio)technology cannot be fully assessed due to the existing uncertainties surrounding their introduction into society. Consequently, the introduction of innovative technologies can be conceptualised as a societal experiment, which is a helpful approach to evaluate moral acceptability. This approach is illustrated with the marketing of sunscreens containing nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles. We argue that the marketing of this TiO2 nanomaterial in UV protective cosmetics is ethically undesirable, since it violates four reasonable moral (...)
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  13. Ibo Van de Poel (2009). Values in Engineering Design. In Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophy of Science. 973-1006.
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  14. Peter Lloyd & Ibo van de Poel (2008). Designing Games to Teach Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):433-447.
    This paper describes a teaching methodology whereby students can gain practical experience of ethical decision-making in the engineering design process. We first argue for the necessity to teach a ‘practical’ understanding of ethical issues in engineering education along with the usual theoretical or hypothetical approaches. We then show how this practical understanding can be achieved by using a collaborative design game, describing how, for example, the concept of responsibility can be explored from this practical basis. We conclude that the use (...)
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  15. Ibo van de Poel (2008). How Should We Do Nanoethics? A Network Approach for Discerning Ethical Issues in Nanotechnology. NanoEthics 2 (1):25-38.
    There is no agreement on how nanoethics should proceed. In this article I focus on approaches for discerning ethical issues in nanotechnology, which is as of yet one of the most difficult and urging tasks for nanoethics. I discuss and criticize two existing approaches for discerning ethical issues in nanotechnology and propose a network approach as alternative. I discuss debates in nanoethics about the desirable role of ethics in nanotechnological development and about the newness of ethical issues in nanotechnology. On (...)
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  16. I. van de Poel & L. Royakkers (2007). The Ethical Cycle. Journal of Business Ethics 71 (1):1-13.
    Arriving at a moral judgment is not a straightforward or linear process in which ethical theories are simply applied to cases. Instead it is a process in which the formulation of the moral problem, the formulation of possible “solutions”, and the ethical judging of these solutions go hand in hand. This messy character of moral problems, however, does not rule out a systematic approach. In this article, we describe a systematic approach to problem solving that does justice to the complex (...)
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  17. Sjoerd D. Zwart, Ibo van de Poel, Harald van Mil & Michiel Brumsen (2006). A Network Approach for Distinguishing Ethical Issues in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):663-684.
    In this paper we report on our experiences with using network analysis to discern and analyse ethical issues in research into, and the development of, a new wastewater treatment technology. Using network analysis, we preliminarily interpreted some of our observations in a Group Decision Room (GDR) session where we invited important stakeholders to think about the risks of this new technology. We show how a network approach is useful for understanding the observations, and suggests some relevant ethical issues. We argue (...)
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  18. Simone van der Burg & Ibo van de Poel (2005). Teaching Ethics and Technology with Agora , an Electronic Tool. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):277-297.
    Courses on ethics and technology have become compulsory for many students at the three Dutch technical universities during the past few years. During this time, teachers have faced a number of didactic problems, which are partly due to a growing number of students. In order to deal with these challenges, teachers in ethics at the three technical universities in the Netherlands — in Delft, Eindhoven and Twente — have developed a web-based computer program called Agora (see www.ethicsandtechnology.com). This program enables (...)
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  19. Michiel Brumsen & Ibo van de Poel (2001). A Special Section on Research in Engineering Ethics Towards a Research Programme for Ethics and Technology. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):365-378.
    In this editorial contribution, two issues relevant to the question, what should be at the top of the research agenda for ethics and technology, are identified and discussed. Firstly: can, and do, engineers make a difference to the degree to which technology leads to morally desirable outcomes? What role does professional autonomy play here, and what are its limits? And secondly, what should be the scope of engineers’ responsibility; that is to say, on which issues are they, as engineers, morally (...)
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  20. I. R. van de Poel, H. Zandvoort & M. Brumsen (2001). Ethics and Engineering Courses at Delft University of Technology: Contents, Educational Setup and Experiences. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (2):267-282.
    This article reports on the development and teaching of compulsory courses on ethics and engineering at Delft University of Technology (DUT). Attention is paid to the teaching goals, the educational setup and methods, the contents of the courses, involvement of staff from engineering schools, experiences to date, and challenges for the future. The choices made with respect to the development and teaching of the courses are placed within the European and Dutch context and are compared and contrasted with the American (...)
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  21. Ibo van de Poel (2001). Investigating Ethical Issues in Engineering Design. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):429-446.
    This paper aims at contributing to a research agenda in engineering ethics by exploring the ethical aspects of engineering design processes. A number of ethically relevant topics with respect to design processes are identified. These topics could be a subject for further research in the field of engineering ethics. In addition, it is argued that the way design processes are now organised and should be organised from a normative point of view is an important topic for research.
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