Search results for 'Iain Boyd Whyte' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Iain Boyd Whyte (ed.) (2010). Beyond the Finite: The Sublime in Art and Science. Oxford University Press.score: 290.0
    Science is continually faced with describing that which is beyond. This book, through contributions from nine prominent scholars, tackles that challenge.
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  2. Iain Boyd Whyte & Claudia Heide (2010). Histoire de l'Art Et Traduction. Diogène 231 (3):60.score: 290.0
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  3. Brian Boyd (2007). Brian Boyd Responds:. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):196-199.score: 120.0
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  4. Ian Boyd (2013). Interview with Fr. Ian Boyd. The Chesterton Review 39 (3):240-244.score: 120.0
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  5. Lancelot Law Whyte (1974/2003). The Universe of Experience: A Worldview Beyond Science and Religion. Transaction Publishers.score: 60.0
    Avoiding the seductive trap of utopianism, Whyte approaches this challenge by defining the terms of a potentially worldwide consensus of heart, mind, and will ...
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  6. Evan Selinger, Jesús Aguilar & Kyle Powys Whyte (2011). Action Schemes: Questions and Suggestions. Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):83-88.score: 60.0
    Action Schemes: Questions and Suggestions Content Type Journal Article Pages 83-88 DOI 10.1007/s13347-010-0007-2 Authors Evan Selinger, Department of Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY USA Jesús Aguilar, Department of Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY USA Kyle Powys Whyte, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI USA Journal Philosophy & Technology Online ISSN 2210-5441 Print ISSN 2210-5433 Journal Volume Volume 24 Journal Issue Volume 24, Number 1.
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  7. Kyle Powys Whyte & Paul B. Thompson (2012). Ideas for How to Take Wicked Problems Seriously. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):441-445.score: 60.0
    Ideas for How to Take Wicked Problems Seriously Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9348-9 Authors Kyle Powys Whyte, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, 503 S. Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Paul B. Thompson, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, 503 S. Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  8. Paul Thompson & Kyle Whyte (2012). What Happens to Environmental Philosophy in a Wicked World? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):485-498.score: 60.0
    Abstract What is the significance of the wicked problems framework for environmental philosophy? In response to wicked problems, environmental scientists are starting to welcome the participation of social scientists, humanists, and the creative arts. We argue that the need for interdisciplinary approaches to wicked problems opens up a number of tasks that environmental philosophers have every right to undertake. The first task is for philosophers to explore new and promising ways of initiating philosophical research through conducting collaborative learning processes on (...)
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  9. Lawrence Busch & Kyle Whyte (2012). On the Peculiarity of Standards: A Reply to Thompson. Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):243-248.score: 60.0
    Abstract As Paul B. Thompson suggests in his recent seminal paper, “‘There’s an App for That’: Technical Standards and Commodification by Technological Means,” technical standards restructure property (and other social) relations. He concludes with the claim that the development of technical standards of commodification can serve purposes with bad effects such as “the rise of the factory system and the deskilling of work” or progressive effects such as how “technical standards for animal welfare… discipline the unwanted consequences of market forces.” (...)
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  10. Rob Boyd, The Evolution of Altruistic Punishment.score: 60.0
    Robert Boyd*†, Herbert Gintis‡, Samuel Bowles§, and Peter J. Richerson¶.
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  11. K. Boyd (1977). Attitudes to Death: Some Historical Notes. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (3):124-128.score: 60.0
    Men have been talking of death from time immemorial - sometimes sublimely in prose and poetry, in painting and sculpture and in music - till silence seemed to fall in the recent past. Now men are again talking about death - interminably but colloquially. They talk on television, on the radio, in books and in pamphlets. Dr Kenneth Boyd therefore finds it entirely timely to offer this historical sketch of attitudes to death. The earlier part of his paper covers (...)
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  12. Kristie Dotson & Kyle Whyte (2013). Environmental Justice, Unknowability and Unqualified Affectability. Ethics and the Environment 18 (2):55-79.score: 60.0
    Environmental justice seeks fairness in how environmental burdens and risks are visited on poor people, women, communities of color, Indigenous peoples, minorities, and citizens of developing countries. It also concerns whether members of these same groups have fair access to environmental goods such as urban green spaces, forested areas, and clean water. Environmental goods extend, also, to opportunities to benefit from enterprises such as tourism and green infrastructure (Shrader-Frechette 2002; Bullard 2000; Taylor 2000; Whyte 2010). The moral wrongs characteristic (...)
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  13. Kenneth Boyd & Jennifer Nagel (2014). The Reliability of Epistemic Intuitions. In Edouard Machery & O'Neill Elizabeth (eds.), Current Controversies in Experimental Philosophy. Routledge. 109-127.score: 30.0
  14. Richard Boyd (1991). Realism, Anti-Foundationalism and the Enthusiasm for Natural Kinds. Philosophical Studies 61 (1-2):127-48.score: 30.0
  15. Richard Boyd (1984). Scientific Realism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 21 (1&2):767-791.score: 30.0
    (i) Scientific realism is primarily a metaphysical doctrine about the existence and nature of the unobservables of science. (ii) There are good explanationist arguments for realism, most famously that from the success of science, provided abduction is allowed. Abduction seems to be on an equal footing, at least, with other ampliative methods of inference. (iii) We have no reason to believe a doctrine of empirical equivalence that would sustain the underdetermination argument against realism. (iv) The key to defending realism from (...)
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  16. Richard Boyd (1988). How to Be a Moral Realist. In G. Sayre-McCord (ed.), Essays on Moral Realism. Cornell University Press. 181-228.score: 30.0
     
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  17. Richard Boyd (2003). Finite Beings, Finite Goods: The Semantics, Metaphysics and Ethics of Naturalist Consequentialism, Part I. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (3):505–553.score: 30.0
  18. Richard N. Boyd (1973). Realism, Underdetermination, and a Causal Theory of Evidence. Noûs 7 (1):1-12.score: 30.0
  19. Richard N. Boyd (1983). On the Current Status of the Issue of Scientific Realism. Erkenntnis 19 (1-3):45 - 90.score: 30.0
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  20. Richard Boyd (1980). Scientific Realism and Naturalistic Epistemology. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:613-662.score: 30.0
    A realistic and dialectical conception of the epistemology of science is advanced according to which the acquisition of instrumental knowledge is parasitic upon the acquisition, by successive approximation, of theoretical knowledge. This conception is extended to provide an epistemological characterization of reference and of natural kinds, and it is integrated into recent naturalistic treatments of knowledge. Implications for several current issues in the philosophy of science are explored.
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  21. Brian Boyd (2004). Laughter and Literature: A Play Theory of Humor. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):1-22.score: 30.0
    : Humor seems uniquely human, but it has deep biological roots. Laughter, the best evidence suggests, derives from the ritualized breathing and open-mouth display common in animal play. Play evolved as training for the unexpected, in creatures putting themselves at risk of losing balance or dominance so that they learn to recover. Humor in turn involves play with the expectations we share-whether innate or acquired-in order to catch one another off guard in ways that simulate risk and stimulate recovery. An (...)
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  22. Joseph T. Giacino & J. T. Whyte (2005). The Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States: Current Knowledge and Remaining Questions. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilation 20 (1):30-50.score: 30.0
  23. Ian E. Thompson, Kath M. Melia & Kenneth M. Boyd (eds.) (2006). Nursing Ethics. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier.score: 30.0
    Ethics in nursing: continuity and change -- Cultural issues, methods and approaches to nursing ethics -- Nursing ethics: what do we mean by 'ethics'? -- Becoming a nurse and member of the profession -- Power and responsibility in nursing practice and management -- Professional responsibility and accountability in nursing -- Classical areas of controversy in nursing and biomedical ethics -- Direct responsibility in nurse/patient relationships -- Conflicting demands in nursing groups of patients -- Ethics in healthcare management: research, evaluation and (...)
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  24. Rob Boyd, Why Culture is Common, but Cultural Evolution is Rare.score: 30.0
    If culture is defined as variation acquired and maintained by social learning, then culture is common in nature. However, cumulative cultural evolution resulting in behaviors that no individual could invent on their own is limited to humans, song birds, and perhaps chimpanzees. Circumstantial evidence suggests that cumulative cultural evolution requires the capacity for observational learning. Here, we analyze two models the evolution of psychological capacities that allow cumulative cultural evolution. Both models suggest that the conditions which allow the evolution of (...)
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  25. Kenneth Boyd (2010). Knowledge in an Uncertain World * by Jeremy Fantl and Matthew McGrath. Analysis 71 (1):189-191.score: 30.0
    A review of Jeremy Fantl and Matthew McGrath's "Knowledge in an Uncertain World.".
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  26. Robert Boyd (1999). Kinds, Complexity, and Multiple Realization. Philosophical Studies 95 (1-2):67-98.score: 30.0
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  27. Peter J. Richerson & Robert Boyd, Why Possibly Language Evolved.score: 30.0
    Human syntactic language has no close parallels in other systems of animal communication. Yet it seems to be an important part of the cultural adaptation that serves to make humans the earth’s dominant organism. Why is language restricted to humans given that communication seems to be so useful? We argue that language is part of human cooperation. We talk because others can normally trust what we say to be useful to them, not just to us. Models of gene-culture coevolution give (...)
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  28. Richard Boyd (2003). Finite Beings, Finite Goods: The Semantics, Metaphysics and Ethics of Naturalist Consequentialism, Part II. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):24–47.score: 30.0
  29. Kyle Powys Whyte & Robert Crease (2010). Trust, Expertise and the Philosophy of Science. Synthese 177 (3):411-425.score: 30.0
    Trust is a central concept in the philosophy of science. We highlight how trust is important in the wide variety of interactions between science and society. We claim that examining and clarifying the nature and role of trust (and distrust) in relations between science and society is one principal way in which the philosophy of science is socially relevant. We argue that philosophers of science should extend their efforts to develop normative conceptions of trust that can serve to facilitate trust (...)
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  30. Richard Boyd (2008). The Madisonian Paradox of Freedom of Association. Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):235-262.score: 30.0
    Freedom of association holds an uneasy place in the pantheon of liberal freedoms. Whereas freedom of association and the abundant plurality of groups that accompany it have been embraced by modern and contemporary liberals, this was not always the case. Unlike more canonical freedoms of speech, press, property, petition, assembly, and religious conscience, the freedom of association was rarely extolled by classical liberal thinkers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Indeed Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Adam Smith, and others seem to (...)
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  31. Peter J. Richerson & Richard Boyd (2004). Darwinian Evolutionary Ethics: Between Patriotism and Sympathy. In Phillip Clayton & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.), Evolution and Ethics: Human Morality in Biological and Religious Perspective. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.. 50--77.score: 30.0
  32. C. Boyd (2010). The Debate Over the Prohibition of Romance in the Workplace. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):325 - 338.score: 30.0
    This article examines why an organization might wish to manage workplace romance, and describes a number of alternative approaches to managing dating. At first sight the ethics of dating bans balances the need to protect female employees from harassment against employee rights to privacy and freedom of association — a rights versus rights issue. However, dating bans seem not to be directed at protecting female employees from harm, but rather protect employers from sexual harassment liability claims -an employer self-interest versus (...)
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  33. Colin Boyd (1996). Ethics and Corporate Governance: The Issues Raised by the Cadbury Report in the United Kingdom. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (2):167 - 182.score: 30.0
    In the late 1980s there was a series of sensational business scandals in the United Kingdom. There was particular public outrage at the plundering of pension funds by Robert Maxwell, at the failure of auditors to expose the impending bankruptcy of the Bank of Credit and Commerce International, and at the apparently undeserved high pay raises received by senior business executives. The City of London responded by creating a special committee to examine the financial aspects of corporate governance. This paper (...)
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  34. Richard N. Boyd (1976). Approximate Truth and Natural Necessity. Journal of Philosophy 73 (18):633-635.score: 30.0
  35. K. M. Boyd (1995). Animal Rights and Human Morality. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):62-62.score: 30.0
  36. Brian Boyd (2001). The Origin of Stories: Horton Hears a Who. Philosophy and Literature 25 (2):197-214.score: 30.0
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  37. Richard N. Boyd (1999). Kinds, Complexity and Multiple Realization: Comments on Millikan's "Historical Kinds and the Special Sciences". Philosophical Studies 95 (1/2):67 - 98.score: 30.0
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  38. Richard N. Boyd (1985). The Logician's Dilemma: Deductive Logic, Inductive Inference and Logical Empiricism. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 22 (1-3):197 - 252.score: 30.0
  39. Richard Boyd (2004). Pity's Pathologies Portrayed: Rousseau and the Limits of Democratic Compassion. Political Theory 32 (4):519-546.score: 30.0
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau is renowned for defending the pity of the state of nature over and against the vanity, cruelty, and inequalities of civil society. In the standard reading, it is this sentiment of pity, activated by our imagination, that allows for the cultivation of compassion. However, a closer look at the "pathologies of pity" in Rousseau's system challenges this idea that pity is a pleasurable sentiment that arises from a recognition of the identity of our natures and leads ultimately to (...)
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  40. L. L. Whyte (1955). One-Way Processes in Physics and Biophysics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 6 (22):107-121.score: 30.0
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  41. Robert Boyd & Peter J. Richerson, The Evolution of Indirect Reciprocity.score: 30.0
    Human societies are based on cooperation among large numbers of genetically unrelated individuals. This behavior is puzzling from an evolutionary perspective. Because cooperators are..
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  42. Colin Boyd (2012). The Nestlé Infant Formula Controversy and a Strange Web of Subsequent Business Scandals. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):283-293.score: 30.0
    The marketing of infant formula in third-world countries in the 1970s by Nestlé S.A. gave rise to a consumer boycott that came to be a widely taught case study in the field of Business Ethics. This article extends that case study by identifying three specific individuals who were associated with managing Nestlé’s response to that boycott. It reveals their subsequent direct involvement in a number of additional “classic” 1980s business scandals (some of which ended with major criminal trials and the (...)
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  43. Robert Boyd, Peter J. Richerson & Joseph Henrich (2008). Five Misunderstandings About Cultural Evolution. Human Nature 19 (2):119-137.score: 30.0
    Recent debates about memetics have revealed some widespread misunderstandings about Darwinian approaches to cultural evolution. Drawing from these debates, this paper disputes five common claims: (1) mental representations are rarely discrete, and therefore models that assume discrete, gene-like particles (i.e., replicators) are useless; (2) replicators are necessary for cumulative, adaptive evolution; (3) content-dependent psychological biases are the only important processes that affect the spread of cultural representations; (4) the “cultural fitness” of a mental representation can be inferred from its successful (...)
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  44. Robert Boyd, Why Is Culture Adaptive?score: 30.0
    species is the extent t0 which behavior is acquired by teaching and imitation. The rapid radiation of the human species into a large variety of ecological niches over a wide geographical range during the last 100,000 years suggests that this mode of adaptation may be quite effective. Until recently, however, few evolutionary biologists have attempted to identify the properties of cultural transmission that make it an effective way of acquiring behavior. Very different answers to this question have been suggested by (...)
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  45. Soren Riis, Evan Selinger & Kyle Powys Whyte (2010). Nudging Utopia. Future Orientation, Copenhagen Institute for Future Studies Magazine 1:29-33.score: 30.0
    A sketch of some of the implications of nudges.
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  46. Richard Boyd (1972). Determinism, Laws, and Predictability in Principle. Philosophy of Science 39 (4):431-450.score: 30.0
    This paper examines commonly offered arguments to show that human behavior is not deterministic because it is not predictable. These arguments turn out to rest on the assumption that deterministic systems must be governed by deterministic laws, and that these give rise to predictability "in principle" of determined events. A positive account of determinism is advanced and it is shown that neither of these assumptions is true. The relation between determinism, laws, and prediction in practice is discussed as a question (...)
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  47. Robert Boyd & Peter J. Richerson, Gene–Culture Coevolution and the Evolution of Social Institutions.score: 30.0
    Social institutions are the laws, informal rules, and conventions that give durable structure to social interactions within a population. Such institutions are typically not designed consciously, are heritable at the population level, are frequently but not always group benefi cial, and are often symbolically marked. Conceptualizing social institutions as one of multiple possible stable cultural equilibrium allows a straightforward explanation of their properties. The evolution of institutions is partly driven by both the deliberate and intuitive decisions of individuals and collectivities. (...)
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  48. Richard Boyd (2010). Homeostasis, Higher Taxa, and Monophyly. Philosophy of Science 77 (5):686-701.score: 30.0
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  49. Brian Boyd (2005). Literature and Evolution: A Bio-Cultural Approach. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):1-23.score: 30.0
  50. Robert Boyd, Gerd Gigerenzer, Peter J. Richerson, Arthur Robson, Jeffrey R. Stevens & Peter Hammerstein, Individual Decision Making and the Evolutionary Roots of Institutions.score: 30.0
    Humans hunt and kill many different species of animals, but whales are our biggest prey. In the North Atlantic, a male long-fi nned pilot whale (Globiceph- ala melaena), a large relative of the dolphins, can grow as large as 6.5 meters and weigh as much as 2.5 tons. As whales go, these are not particularly large, but there are more than 750,000 pilot whales in the North Atlantic, traveling in groups, “pods,” that range from just a few individuals to a (...)
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