9 found
Sort by:
  1. Ian Almond (2010). History of Islam in German Thought From Leibniz to Nietzsche. Routledge.
    Introduction -- Leibniz, historicism, and the plague of Islam -- Kant, Islam, and the preservation of boundaries -- Herder's Arab fantasies -- Keeping the Turks out of islam : Goethe's Ottoman plan -- Friedrich Schlegel and the emptying of Islam -- Hegel and the disappearance of Islam -- Marx the Moor -- Nietzsche's peace with Islam.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ian Almond (2004). Experimenting with Islam: Nietzschean Reflections on Bowles's Araplaina. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):309-323.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ian Almond (2004). Sufism and Deconstruction: A Comparative Study of Derrida and Ibn ʻarabi. Routledge.
    This book examines a series of common metaphors in the works of Derrida and the Sufism of Muhyddin Ibn 'Arabi, considered to be of the most influential figures in Islamic thought. The author addresses the significant absence of attention on the relationship between Islam and Derrida and also provides a deconstructive perspective on Ibn 'Arabi.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ian Almond (2004). The Madness of Islam': Foucault's Occident and the Revolution in Iran. Radical Philosophy 128:12-22.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ian Almond (2003). Religious Echoes of the Errant Text: Darker Shades of Derrida's Pathless Way. Heythrop Journal 44 (3):294–304.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ian Almond (2003). The Shackles of Reason: Sufi/Deconstructive Opposition to Rational Thought. Philosophy East and West 53 (1):22-38.
    : The status of Ibn 'Arabi and Derrida as thinkers is examined: their disagreements with rational/metaphysical thought on the basis of différance and what Ibn 'Arabi calls al-haqq or the Real. Advantage is taken of the fact that both writers speak of emancipatory projects in their work-the freeing of writing from the shackles of logocentric thought and of the unthinkably Divine (the Real) from the constructs of philosophers and theologians. Just as Ibn 'Arabi believes that no thinker can provide ''a (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ian Almond (2002). Different Fragments, Different Vases: A Neoplatonic Commentary on Benjamin's 'the Task of the Translator'. Heythrop Journal 43 (2):185–198.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ian Almond (2001). Divine Needs, Divine Illusions: Preliminary Remarks Toward a Comparative Study of Meister Eckhart and Ibn Al'Arabi. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 10 (02):263-282.
  9. Ian Almond (1999). Negative Theology, Derrida and the Critique of Presence: A Poststructuralist Reading of Meister Eckhart. Heythrop Journal 40 (2):150–165.