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Ian Angus [23]Ian H. Angus [11]
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Profile: Ian Angus (Simon Fraser University)
  1. Ian Angus (unknown). The Illusion of Technique. [REVIEW] Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 2.
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  2. Ian Angus (forthcoming). Alcoff, Linda Martin and Eduardo Mendieta, Eds. Thinking From the Underside of History: Enrique DusseVs Philosophy of Liberation. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. Ix+ 300 Pp. $22.95 Pb. [REVIEW] Philosophy Today.
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  3. Ian Angus (2012). Introduction to a Symposium of World Humanities. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):472-475.
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  4. Ian Angus (2012). Limits to Social Representation of Value: Response to Leroy Little Bear. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):537-548.
    In response to Leroy Little Bear's description of the Blackfoot identity as rooted in place, the article articulates an ecological conception of value based in European thought that can be in close dialogue with the telling aboriginal phrase “I am the environment.” While important similarities are noted, especially the convergence of aboriginal and ecological conceptions of value on a critique of the assessment of value by commodity price, the difficulty of rooting value in Being within the European tradition contrasts with (...)
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  5. Ian Angus (2012). The Pathos of a First Meeting: Particularity and Singularity in the Critique of Technological Civilization. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 16 (1):179-202.
    An essay is presented on the content of critic George Grant's conception and clarity of particularity by comparing it to Reiner Schürmann's concept of singularity. It says that the importance of positive expression of the endangered good plays a central role in Grant's motivation of criticizing technological civilization. It mentions that Grant's philosophy of love and knowledge came from the influences of Jerusalem and Greece. Moreover, the five-step existential logic is discussed.
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  6. Winthrop Pickard Bell & Ian Angus (2012). The Idea of a Nation. Symposium 16 (2):34-46.
    Winthrop Pickard Bell (1884–1965), a Canadian who studied with Husserl in Göttingen from 1911 to 1914, was arrested after the outbreak of World War I and interred at Ruhleben Prison Camp for the duration of the war. In 1915 or 1916 he presented a lecture titled “Canadian Problems and Possibilities” to other internees at the prison camp. This is the first time Bell’s lecture has appeared in print. Even though the lecture was given to a general audience and thusmakes no (...)
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  7. Ian Angus (2011). A Conversation with Leslie Armour. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 15 (1):72-93.
    Leslie Armour is the author of numerous books and essays on epistemology, metaphysics, logic, Canadian philosophy and Blaise Pascal, as well as on ethics, social and political philosophy, the history of philosophy (especially seventeenth-century philosophy) and social economics. A fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, he has worked as a reporter for The Vancouver Province, briefly as a sub-editor at Reuters News Agency, and for several years as a columnist and feature writer for London Express News and Feature Services. (...)
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  8. Ian Angus (2009). Heideggerian Marxism. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 13 (1):113-136.
  9. Ian Angus (2006). Dominique Janicaud, On the Human Condition Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (4):263-265.
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  10. Ian Angus (2006). Dominique Janicaud, On the Human Condition. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 26:263-265.
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  11. Ian Angus (2006). Phenomenology as Critique of Institutions: Movements, Authentic Sociality and Nothingness. Phaenex 1 (1):175-196.
    This essay seeks to demonstrate that the practice of phenomenological philosophy entails a practice of social and political criticism. The original demand of phenomenology is that theoretical and scientific judgments must be based upon the giving of the ‘things themselves’ in self-evident intuition. The continuous radicalization of this demand is what characterizes phenomenological philosophy and determines a practice of social and political criticism which can be traced through four phases: 1. a critique of institutions through the method of unbuilding (Abbau, (...)
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  12. Ian Angus (2005). Bodies of Meaning. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 9 (1):142-145.
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  13. Ian Angus (2005). Jacob Klein's Revisionof Husserl's Crisis. Philosophy Today 49 (Supplement):204-211.
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  14. Ian Angus (2005). Socrates and the Critique of Metaphysics. The European Legacy 10 (4):299-314.
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  15. Ian Angus (2005). Walking on Two Legs: On the Very Possibility of a Heideggerian Marxism. [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (3):335 - 352.
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  16. Ian Angus (2004). In Praise of Fire. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 4:21-52.
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  17. Ian Angus (2004). In Praise of Fire: Responsibility, Manifestation, Polemos, Circumspection. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 4:21-52.
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  18. Ian H. Angus (2004). Empire, Borders, Place: A Critique of Hardt and Negri's Concept of Empire. Theory and Event 7 (3).
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  19. Ian Angus (2001). Place and Locality in Heidegger's Late Thought. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 5 (1):5-23.
    A strand of contemporary philosophy has turned from the traditional focus on universality toward conceptions of “one’s own,” “place,” and “particularity.” In the recovery of “place” and “Iocation,” no attempt has been made to distinguish betwen these terms nor to investigate their different implications even though there is an incipient distinction between them in Heidegger’s late work. This meditation on the relationship between place (Ort) and locality (Ortschaft) begins from Heidegger’s texts in which the distinction was made. The second part (...)
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  20. Ian H. Angus (2000). (Dis)Figurations: Discourse/Critique/Ethics. Verso.
    Recent paradigmatic shifts in favor of the 'discourse' approach in social theory are explored and debated.
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  21. Ian H. Angus (2000). Primal Scenes of Communication Communication, Consumerism, and Social Movements. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  22. Ian Angus (1998). The Gift of Death. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 2 (1):101-107.
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  23. Ian Angus (1995). From Ideology-Critique to Epochal Criticism. Argumentation 9 (1):33-57.
    It is a danger in the discursive turn in the human sciences that social criticism be abandoned in favour of ‘continuing the conversation.’ However, an analysis of the reflexive paradox inherent in every communication act provides the basis for a non-foundationalist critique of the historical epoch.
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  24. Ian Angus (1994). A Blank Sheet of Paper: The Phenomenological Foundation of Comparative Media Theory. [REVIEW] Human Studies 17 (1):9 - 22.
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  25. Ian H. Angus & Lenore Langsdorf (1993). The Critical Turn Rhetoric and Philosophy in Postmodern Discourse.
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  26. Ian Angus, Lenore Langsdorf, S. Atran, Robert M. Baird, Stuart E. Rosembaum, C. Bonelli Munegato, Scott M. Christensen, Dale R. Turner, Bohdan Dziemidok & Peter Engelmann (1993). Appearance in This List Does Not Preclude a Future Review of the Book. Where They Are Known Prices Are Either Given in $ US or in£ UK. Alcoff, Linda and Potter, Elizabeth (Eds.), Feminist Epistemologies, London, UK, Rout-Ledge, 1993, Pp. 312,£ 35.00,£ 12.99. [REVIEW] Mind 102:406.
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  27. Ian Angus & Lenore Langsdorf (eds.) (1992). The Critical Turn: Rhetoric & Philosophy in Postmodern Discourse. Southern Illinois University Press.
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  28. Ian H. Angus (1987). George Grant's Platonic Rejoinder to Heidegger Contemporary Political Philosophy and the Question of Technology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  29. Ian H. Angus (1984). Technique and Enlightenment: Limits of Instrumental Reason. University Press of America.
     
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  30. Ian H. Angus (1983). Disenchantment and Modernity: The Mirror of Technique. [REVIEW] Human Studies 6 (1):141 - 166.
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  31. Ian H. Angus (1980). Technique and Enlightenment: Limits of Instrumental Reason in the Life-World. Dissertation, York University (Canada)
    The present work develops the concept of instrumental reason in order to elaborate the implications of the connection of formalistic theory and technical action. Through a critique of this concept it establishes the limitations of instrumental reason and the necessity for a deeper conception o.
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  32. Ian H. Angus (1980). Toward a Philosophy of Technology. Research in Phenomenology 10 (1):320-327.
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  33. Ian H. Angus (1979). Toward a Phenomenology of Rational Action. Man and World 12 (3):298-321.
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  34. Ian H. Angus (1973). The Function of the Sciences and the Meaning of Man. By Enzo Paci. Trans. Paul Piccone, James E. Hansen. Evanston: Northwestern University Press. 1972. Pp. Xxxv, 475, $15.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 12 (02):359-361.
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