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  1. Justin T. Denholm & Ian H. Kerridge (2014). Privacy in the Context of “Re-Emergent” Infectious Diseases. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):263-264.
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  2. Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny (2014). Double Meanings Will Not Save the Principle of Double Effect. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):304-316.
    In an article somewhat ironically entitled “Disambiguating Clinical Intentions,” Lynn Jansen promotes an idea that should be bewildering to anyone familiar with the literature on the intention/foresight distinction. According to Jansen, “intention” has two commonsense meanings, one of which is equivalent to “foresight.” Consequently, questions about intention are “infected” with ambiguity—people cannot tell what they mean and do not know how to answer them. This hypothesis is unsupported by evidence, but Jansen states it as if it were accepted fact. In (...)
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  3. Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny (2013). Narratives of 'Terminal Sedation', and the Importance of the Intention-Foresight Distinction in Palliative Care Practice. Bioethics 27 (1):1-11.
    The moral importance of the ‘intention–foresight’ distinction has long been a matter of philosophical controversy, particularly in the context of end-of-life care. Previous empirical research in Australia has suggested that general physicians and surgeons may use analgesic or sedative infusions with ambiguous intentions, their actions sometimes approximating ‘slow euthanasia’. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study of 18 Australian palliative care medical specialists, using in-depth interviews to address the use of sedation at the end of life. The (...)
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  4. Ronald K. F. Fung & Ian H. Kerridge (2013). Uncertain Translation, Uncertain Benefit and Uncertain Risk: Ethical Challenges Facing First-in-Human Trials of Induced Pluripotent Stem (Ips) Cells. Bioethics 27 (2):89-96.
    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in 2006 was heralded as a major breakthrough in stem cell research. Since then, progress in iPS cell technology has paved the way towards clinical application, particularly cell replacement therapy, which has refueled debate on the ethics of stem cell research. However, much of the discourse has focused on questions of moral status and potentiality, overlooking the ethical issues which are introduced by the clinical testing of iPS cell replacement therapy. First-in-human trials, (...)
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  5. Camilla Scanlan & Ian H. Kerridge (2009). Autonomy and Chronic Illness: Not Two Components but Many. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):40 – 42.
  6. Gabrielle N. Samuel & Ian H. Kerridge (2007). Equity, Utility, and the Marketplace: Emerging Ethical Issues of Umbilical Cord Blood Banking in Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):57-63.
    Over the past decade, umbilical cord blood (UCB) has routinely been used as a source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic stem cell transplants in the treatment of a range of malignant and non-malignant conditions affecting children and adults. UCB banks are a necessary part of the UCB transplant program, but their establishment has raised a number of important scientific, ethical and political issues. This paper examines the scientific and clinical evidence that has provided the basis for the establishment of (...)
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  7. Paul M. McNeill, Ian H. Kerridge, Catherine Arciuli, David A. Henry, Graham J. Macdonald, Richard O. Day & Suzanne R. Hill (2006). Gifts, Drug Samples, and Other Items Given to Medical Specialists by Pharmaceutical Companies. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (3):139-148.
    Aim To ascertain the quantity and nature of gifts and items provided by the pharmaceutical industry in Australia to medical specialists and to consider whether these are appropriate in terms of justifiable ethical standards, empirical research and views expressed in the literature.
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  8. Catherine Myser, Ian H. Kerridge & Kenneth R. Mitchell (1995). Teaching Medical Ethics Symposium: Teaching Clinical Ethics as a Professional Skill: Bridging the Gap Between Knowledge and Ethics and its Use in Clinical Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):97-103.
     
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