Search results for 'Ian Hamilton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alastair Hamilton (2008). Heterodoxy in Early Modern Science and Religion. Edited by John Brooke and Ian Maclean. Heythrop Journal 49 (4):678–679.
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  2.  22
    Joakim Sandberg, Carmen Juravle, Ted Martin Hedesström & Ian Hamilton (2009). The Heterogeneity of Socially Responsible Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):519 - 533.
    Many writers have commented on the heterogeneity of the socially responsible investment (SRI) movement. However, few have actually tried to understand and explain it, and even fewer have discussed whether the opposite – standardisation – is possible and desirable. In this article, we take a broader perspective on the issue of the heterogeneity of SRI. We distinguish between four levels on which heterogeneity can be found: the terminological, definitional, strategic and practical. Whilst there is much talk about the definitional ambiguities (...)
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  3. Ian Smith, Justin Goodman, Raj Ramanathapillai, Shalin Gala, John Sorenson, Bill Hamilton, Ana Morron, Julie Andrzejewski, Elliot M. Katz & Colman McCarthy (2013). Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex. Lexington Books.
    Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex is the first book to examine how nonhuman animals are used in war and the military. Animals and War contributes significantly to the fields of social justice, animal rights, and anti-war/peace activist communities. This book also will be read by peace, conflict, social justice, and critical animal studies scholars, students, and practitioners.
     
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  4.  2
    Eileen Willis, Luisa Toffoli, Julie Henderson, Leah Couzner, Patricia Hamilton, Claire Verrall & Ian Blackman (forthcoming). Rounding, Work Intensification and New Public Management. Nursing Inquiry:n/a-n/a.
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  5. Joakim Sandberg, Carmen Juravle, Ted Martin Hedesström & Ian Hamilton (2009). The Heterogeneity of Socially Responsible Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):519-533.
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  6. David Hamilton, Glen Atkinson, William M. Dugger & William T. Waller Jr (eds.) (2009). Cultural Economics and Theory: The Evolutionary Economics of David Hamilton. Routledge.
    David Hamilton is a leader in the American institutionalist school of heterodox economics that emerged after WWII. This volume includes 25 articles written by Hamilton over a period of nearly half a century. In these articles he examines the philosophical foundations and practical problems of economics. The result of this is a unique institutionalist view of how economies evolve and how economics itself has evolved with them. Hamilton applies insight gained from his study of culture to send (...)
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  7.  1
    G. J. Hamilton & A. H. Smith (1901). Gavin Hamilton's Letters to Charles Townley. Journal of Hellenic Studies 21:306.
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  8. George Grote, John Stuart Mill & William Hamilton (1868). Review of the Work of Mr John Stuart Mill, Entitled, 'Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy'. [REVIEW] Trübner.
     
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  9. Ontario Hamilton (2000). Canada. Art Gallery of Hamilton. In Mike Crang & N. J. Thrift (eds.), Thinking Space. Routledge
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  10. Lawrence Hamilton (2009). Human Needs and Political Judgment Lawrence Hamilton. In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan 40.
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  11. William Hamilton & John Stuart Mill (1866). Hamilton Versus Mill a Thorough Discussion of Each Chapter in Mr. John S. Mill`s Examination of Hamilton`s Logic and Philosophy Beginning with the Logic''. Maclachan and Stewart.
     
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  12. Alexander Hamilton (1971). The Works of Alexander Hamilton: Comprising His Most Important Official Reports; An Improved Edition of the Federalist, on the New Constitution, Written in 1788; And Pacificus, on the Proclamation of Neutrality, Written in 1793. Philosophy and Rhetoric 4 (3):178-180.
     
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  13. Thomas Reid & William Hamilton (1967). Philosophical Works, with Notes and Supplementary Dissertations by Sir William Hamilton. With an Introd. By Harry M. Bracken. [REVIEW] G. Olms Verlagsbuchhandlung.
     
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  14. Thomas Reid & William Hamilton (1853). Reid's Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, From His Collected Writings by Sir W. Hamilton, and with the Foot-Notes of the Editor.
     
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  15. Dugald Stewart, William Hamilton & John Veitch (1854). The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart, Ed. By Sir W. Hamilton, [Concluded by J. Veitch].
     
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  16.  4
    Fiona Hughes, Um Potencial Político No Juízo Estético Reflexionante: Kant, Hannah Arendt E “Pequena Esparta”, de Ian Hamilton Finlay [A Political Potential in Aesthetic Reflective Judgement: Kant, Hannah Arendt and Ian Hamilton Finlay’s “Little Sparta”].
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  17. Brian E. Butler (2009). Neo-Neo-Classicism: The Artistic and Political Challenge of Ian Hamilton Finlay, Geometer. Geometer.
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  18.  7
    Harry Gilonis (2000). Knowing the Land Where Neon Blooms: Ian Hamilton Finlay's 1999 Installation in Erfurt. Angelaki 5 (1):115-118.
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  19. William Charlton (1986). "Ian Hamilton Finlay: A Visual Primer": Yves Abrioux. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (4):406.
     
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  20. Lawrence A. Hamilton (2004). The Political Philosophy of Needs. Cambridge University Press.
    This ambitious and lively book argues for a rehabilitation of the concept of 'human needs' as central to politics and political theory. Contemporary political philosophy has focused on issues of justice and welfare to the exclusion of the important issues of political participation, democratic sovereignty, and the satisfaction of human needs, and this has had a deleterious effect on political practice. Lawrence Hamilton develops a compelling positive conception of human needs: the evaluation of needs must be located within a (...)
     
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  21.  13
    James R. Hamilton (2007). The Art of Theater. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Hamilton argues that theatrical performances have always been regarded as works produced for inspection and evaluation in their own right. The reason this has been obscured is the enormously successful text-based literary tradition in modern European theater. To show why this is as it should be, Hamilton shows how theater's spectators pick out, grasp, and assess performances without reference to the texts they employ, even within that successful literary tradition.
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  22.  63
    Andrew Hamilton & Christopher Dimond (2012). Groups, Individuals, and Evolutionary Restraints: The Making of the Contemporary Debate Over Group Selection. Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):299-312.
    Groups, individuals, and evolutionary restraints : the making of the contemporary debate over group selection Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-14 DOI 10.1007/s10539-011-9255-5 Authors Andrew Hamilton, Center for Biology and Society, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA Christopher C. Dimond, Center for Biology and Society, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA Journal Biology and Philosophy Online ISSN 1572-8404 Print ISSN 0169-3867.
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  23.  64
    A. G. Hamilton (1978). Logic for Mathematicians. Cambridge University Press.
    Intended for logicians and mathematicians, this text is based on Dr. Hamilton's lectures to third and fourth year undergraduates in mathematics at the ...
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  24.  4
    Richard Hamilton, Expressing Pain: Wittgenstein and the 'Problems of Other Minds'.
    Neurophenomena such as central sensitisation, hyperalgesia and allodynia, speak of a brain that is anything but hardwired. The brain's ability to self-organise in staggeringly complex ways forces us to look beyond what turn out to be perceptions of a body-mind reference, ie the idea of a mind is more a story than an actuality. There are mounting criticisms of body-mind dualism, , but with poor understanding of what philosophical narrative can replace it. Clearly, our human condition and pain's unique role (...)
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  25. Ross Hamilton (2008). Accident: A Philosophical and Literary History. University of Chicago Press.
    An accidental glance at a newspaper notice causes Rousseau to collapse under the force of a vision. A car accidentally hits Giacometti, and he experiences an epiphany. Darwin introduces accident to the basic process of life, and Freud looks to accident as the expression of unconscious desire. Accident, Ross Hamilton claims, is the force that makes us modern. Tracing the story of accident from Aristotle to Buster Keaton and beyond, Hamilton’s daring book revives the tradition of the grand (...)
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  26. James R. Hamilton (2009). Drama. In Higgins Davies (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Aesthetics.
    Hamilton explains why "drama" is a category of literature rather than of theater, even though it is appropriate to describe many theatrical performances as "dramatic." Consideration of the possibilities of theatrical performance are especially important to this category of literature, but need not be (and often are not) decisive in constraining interpretations of dramatic works.
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  27.  32
    Sue Hamilton (2001). Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    India has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thought, spanning some two and a half millenia and encompassing several major religious traditions. Now, in this intriguing introduction to Indian philosophy, the diversity of Indian thought is emphasized. It is structured around six schools of thought that have received classic status. Sue Hamilton explores how the traditions have attempted to understand the nature of reality in terms of inner or spiritual quest and introduces distinctively Indian concepts, such as (...)
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  28. Christopher Hamilton (2014). Middle Age. Routledge.
    Middle age, for many, marks a key period for a radical reappraisal of one's life and way of living. The sense of time running out, both from the perspective that one's life has ground to a halt, and from the point of view of the greater closeness of death, and the sense of loneliness engendered by the compromised and wasteful nature of life, become ever clearer in mid-life, and can lead to a period of dramatic self doubt.In this book, the (...)
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  29. Christopher Hamilton (2009). Middle Age. Routledge.
    Middle age, for many, marks a key period for a radical reappraisal of one's life and way of living. The sense of time running out, both from the perspective that one's life has ground to a halt, and from the point of view of the greater closeness of death, and the sense of loneliness engendered by the compromised and wasteful nature of life, become ever clearer in mid-life, and can lead to a period of dramatic self doubt.In this book, the (...)
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  30. John T. Hamilton (2008). Music, Madness, and the Unworking of Language. Columbia University Press.
    However, as Hamilton demonstrates, although various conflicts between music, madness, and language questioned the visibility of signification, they also raised the possibility of producing meaning beyond signification."--BOOK JACKET.
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  31. John T. Hamilton (2013). Music, Madness, and the Unworking of Language. Cup.
    In the romantic tradition, music is consistently associated with madness, either as cause or cure. Writers as diverse as Kleist, Hoffmann, and Nietzsche articulated this theme, which in fact reaches back to classical antiquity and continues to resonate in the modern imagination. What John Hamilton investigates in this study is the way literary, philosophical, and psychological treatments of music and madness challenge the limits of representation and thereby create a crisis of language. Special focus is given to the decidedly (...)
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  32. James R. Hamilton (2010). Narrative, Fiction, Imagination. In Pokorny Kotatko (ed.), Fictionality-Possibility-Reality.
    Hamilton argues that narratives engage our imaginations not so much by having us pretend the events they depict are true or present as by having us engage in a kind of anticipation of events to come. The idea is that the grasp of a narratively structured presentation is explained in very much the same way any sequence of events, considered as a sequence, is grasped.
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  33. Grant Hamilton (2011). On Representation: Deleuze and Coetzee on the Colonized Subject. Editions Rodopi.
    In this important new study, Hamilton establishes and develops innovative links between the sites of postcolonial literary theory, the fiction of the South African/Australian academic and Nobel Prize-winning writer J.M. Coetzee, and the work of the French poststructuralist philosopher Gilles Deleuze. Centering on the key postcolonial problematic of representation, Hamilton argues that if one approaches the colonial subject through Gilles Deleuze’s rewriting of subjectivity, then a transcendent configuration of the colonial subject is revealed. Importantly, it is this rendition (...)
     
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  34. Lawrence A. Hamilton (2009). The Political Philosophy of Needs. Cambridge University Press.
    This ambitious and lively book argues for a rehabilitation of the concept of 'human needs' as central to politics and political theory. Contemporary political philosophy has focused on issues of justice and welfare to the exclusion of the important issues of political participation, democratic sovereignty, and the satisfaction of human needs, and this has had a deleterious effect on political practice. Lawrence Hamilton develops a compelling positive conception of human needs: the evaluation of needs must be located within a (...)
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  35. Lawrence A. Hamilton (2007). The Political Philosophy of Needs. Cambridge University Press.
    This ambitious and lively book argues for a rehabilitation of the concept of 'human needs' as central to politics and political theory. Contemporary political philosophy has focused on issues of justice and welfare to the exclusion of the important issues of political participation, democratic sovereignty, and the satisfaction of human needs, and this has had a deleterious effect on political practice. Lawrence Hamilton develops a compelling positive conception of human needs: the evaluation of needs must be located within a (...)
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  36. Lawrence A. Hamilton (2003). The Political Philosophy of Needs. Cambridge University Press.
    This ambitious and lively book argues for a rehabilitation of the concept of 'human needs' as central to politics and political theory. Contemporary political philosophy has focused on issues of justice and welfare to the exclusion of the important issues of political participation, democratic sovereignty, and the satisfaction of human needs, and this has had a deleterious effect on political practice. Lawrence Hamilton develops a compelling positive conception of human needs: the evaluation of needs must be located within a (...)
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  37. James R. Hamilton (2007). Theatrical Space. Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism 31 (2):21-47.
    Hamilton shows how awareness of the uses of space -- in particular uses of space in which to stage an event of any kind -- enable spectators to pick out characters, props, and the like across performances within production runs, across production runs, and even across productions employing different scripts. The key ideas of object identification are taken both from the philosophical and the empirical literature and are treated as epistemic ideas rather than metaphysical conceptions.
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  38. James R. Hamilton (2006). Understanding Plays. In Saltz Krasner (ed.), Staging Philosophy.
    Hamilton argues that there is a level of understanding of theatrical performances, and narrative performances in particular (called "plays"), that does not require grasp of the large-scale aesthetic features that usually inform the structure of what is presented. This "basic understanding" is required for any spectator to go on to have a deeper understanding and, so, grounds any spectator's understanding of the larger-scale features of a performance.
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  39.  4
    Ian McPhee, V. Smallwood & S. Woodford (2004). Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 20: The British Museum 10: Fragments From Sir William Hamilton's Second Collection of Vases Recovered From the Wreck of HMS Colossus. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:212.
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  40. Ian McPhee (2004). (V.) Smallwood and (S.) Woodford Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 20: The British Museum. London: British Museum Press, 2003. Pp. 141, Pls A-H (Col.) + 86. £85. 071412236X.(V.) Smallwood and (S.) Woodford Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 10: Fragments From Sir William Hamilton's Second Collection of Vases Recovered From the Wreck of HMS Colossus. London: British Museum Press, 2003. Pp. 141, Pls A-H (Col.) + 86. £85. 071412236X. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:212-213.
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  41. William P. Bechtel & Andrew Hamilton (2007). Reduction, Integration, and the Unity of Science: Natural, Behavioral, and Social Sciences and the Humanities. In T. Kuipers (ed.), Philosophy of Science: Focal Issues (Volume 1 of the Handbook of the Philosophy of Science). Elsevier
    1. A Historical Look at Unity 2. Field Guide to Modern Concepts of Reduction and Unity 3. Kitcher's Revisionist Account of Unification 4. Critics of Unity 5. Integration Instead of Unity 6. Reduction via Mechanisms 7. Case Studies in Reduction and Unification across the Disciplines.
     
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  42.  34
    Andy Hamilton (2000). The Authority of Avowals and the Concept of Belief. European Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):20-39.
    The pervasive dispositional model of belief is misguided. It fails to acknowledge the authority of first‐person ascriptions or avowals of belief, and the “decision principle”– that having decided the question whether p, there is, for me, no further question whether I believe that p. The dilemma is how one can have immediate knowledge of a state extended in time; its resolution lies in the expressive character of avowals – which does not imply a non‐assertoric thesis – and their non‐cognitive status. (...)
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  43.  6
    Suparna Rajaram, Maryellen Hamilton & Anthony Bolton (2002). Distinguishing States of Awareness From Confidence During Retrieval: Evidence From Amnesia. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience 2 (3):227-235.
  44.  39
    A. Hamilton (1995). A New Look at Personal Identity. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (180):332-349.
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  45.  46
    Andy Hamilton (2003). 'Scottish Commonsense' About Memory: A Defence of Thomas Reid's Direct Knowledge Account. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):229-245.
    Reid rejects the image theory --the representative or indirect realist position--that memory-judgements are inferred from or otherwise justified by a present image or introspectible state. He also rejects the trace theory , which regards memories as essentially traces in the brain. In contrast he argues for a direct knowledge account in which personal memory yields unmediated knowledge of the past. He asserts the reliability of memory, not in currently fashionable terms as a reliable belief-forming process, but more elusively as a (...)
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  46.  8
    Maryellen Hamilton & Suparna Rajaram (2003). States of Awareness Across Multiple Memory Tasks: Obtaining a "Pure" Measure of Conscious Recollection. Acta Psychologica 112 (1):43-69.
  47.  15
    Kelly Ann Hamilton (2001). Some Philosophical Consequences of Wittgenstein's Aeronautical Research. Perspectives on Science 9 (1):1-37.
    : Before he studied philosophy under Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wittgenstein was trained as an engineer at the Technische Hochschule in Berlin. He then worked as a graduate research engineer at the University of Manchester, where he designed a variable volume combustion chamber and received a patent for an innovative propeller design in 1911. I argue that the methodology of contemporary aeronautical engineering research, involving the systematic use of experiments and scale models, affected the Bild theory of language in the Tractatus (...)
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  48.  45
    Andy Hamilton (1998). False Memory Syndrome and the Authority of Personal Memory-Claims: A Philosophical Perspective. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (4):283-297.
  49.  40
    James Jay Hamilton (1978). Hobbes's Study and the Hardwick Library. Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (4):445-453.
  50.  20
    Andy Hamilton (1990). Ernst Mach and the Elimination of Subjectivity. Ratio 3 (2):117-135.
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