Search results for 'Ian Hamilton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alastair Hamilton (2008). Heterodoxy in Early Modern Science and Religion. Edited by John Brooke and Ian Maclean. Heythrop Journal 49 (4):678–679.
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  2.  25
    Joakim Sandberg, Carmen Juravle, Ted Martin Hedesström & Ian Hamilton (2009). The Heterogeneity of Socially Responsible Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):519 - 533.
    Many writers have commented on the heterogeneity of the socially responsible investment (SRI) movement. However, few have actually tried to understand and explain it, and even fewer have discussed whether the opposite – standardisation – is possible and desirable. In this article, we take a broader perspective on the issue of the heterogeneity of SRI. We distinguish between four levels on which heterogeneity can be found: the terminological, definitional, strategic and practical. Whilst there is much talk about the definitional ambiguities (...)
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  3. Ian Smith, Justin Goodman, Raj Ramanathapillai, Shalin Gala, John Sorenson, Bill Hamilton, Ana Morron, Julie Andrzejewski, Elliot M. Katz & Colman McCarthy (2013). Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex. Lexington Books.
    Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex is the first book to examine how nonhuman animals are used in war and the military. Animals and War contributes significantly to the fields of social justice, animal rights, and anti-war/peace activist communities. This book also will be read by peace, conflict, social justice, and critical animal studies scholars, students, and practitioners.
     
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  4.  3
    Joakim Sandberg, Carmen Juravle, Ted Martin Hedesström & Ian Hamilton (2009). The Heterogeneity of Socially Responsible Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):519-533.
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  5.  2
    Eileen Willis, Luisa Toffoli, Julie Henderson, Leah Couzner, Patricia Hamilton, Claire Verrall & Ian Blackman (forthcoming). Rounding, Work Intensification and New Public Management. Nursing Inquiry:n/a-n/a.
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  6. David Hamilton, Glen Atkinson, William M. Dugger & William T. Waller Jr (eds.) (2009). Cultural Economics and Theory: The Evolutionary Economics of David Hamilton. Routledge.
    David Hamilton is a leader in the American institutionalist school of heterodox economics that emerged after WWII. This volume includes 25 articles written by Hamilton over a period of nearly half a century. In these articles he examines the philosophical foundations and practical problems of economics. The result of this is a unique institutionalist view of how economies evolve and how economics itself has evolved with them. Hamilton applies insight gained from his study of culture to send (...)
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  7.  1
    G. J. Hamilton & A. H. Smith (1901). Gavin Hamilton's Letters to Charles Townley. Journal of Hellenic Studies 21:306.
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  8. George Grote, John Stuart Mill & William Hamilton (1868). Review of the Work of Mr John Stuart Mill, Entitled, 'Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy'. [REVIEW] Trübner.
     
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  9. Ontario Hamilton (2000). Canada. Art Gallery of Hamilton. In Mike Crang & N. J. Thrift (eds.), Thinking Space. Routledge
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  10. Lawrence Hamilton (2009). Human Needs and Political Judgment Lawrence Hamilton. In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan 40.
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  11. William Hamilton & John Stuart Mill (1866). Hamilton Versus Mill a Thorough Discussion of Each Chapter in Mr. John S. Mill`s Examination of Hamilton`s Logic and Philosophy Beginning with the Logic''. Maclachan and Stewart.
     
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  12. Alexander Hamilton (1971). The Works of Alexander Hamilton: Comprising His Most Important Official Reports; An Improved Edition of the Federalist, on the New Constitution, Written in 1788; And Pacificus, on the Proclamation of Neutrality, Written in 1793. Philosophy and Rhetoric 4 (3):178-180.
     
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  13. Rudolf Hermann Lotze & Elizabeth Hamilton (1885). Microcosmus, an Essay Concerning Man and His Relation to the World, Tr. By E. Hamilton and E.E.C. Jones.
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  14. Thomas Reid & William Hamilton (1967). Philosophical Works, with Notes and Supplementary Dissertations by Sir William Hamilton. With an Introd. By Harry M. Bracken. [REVIEW] G. Olms Verlagsbuchhandlung.
     
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  15. Thomas Reid & William Hamilton (1853). Reid's Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, From His Collected Writings by Sir W. Hamilton, and with the Foot-Notes of the Editor.
     
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  16. Dugald Stewart, William Hamilton & John Veitch (1854). The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart, Ed. By Sir W. Hamilton, [Concluded by J. Veitch].
     
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  17. Brian E. Butler (2009). Neo-Neo-Classicism: The Artistic and Political Challenge of Ian Hamilton Finlay, Geometer. Geometer.
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  18.  4
    Fiona Hughes, Um Potencial Político No Juízo Estético Reflexionante: Kant, Hannah Arendt E “Pequena Esparta”, de Ian Hamilton Finlay [A Political Potential in Aesthetic Reflective Judgement: Kant, Hannah Arendt and Ian Hamilton Finlay’s “Little Sparta”].
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  19.  7
    Harry Gilonis (2000). Knowing the Land Where Neon Blooms: Ian Hamilton Finlay's 1999 Installation in Erfurt. Angelaki 5 (1):115-118.
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  20. William Charlton (1986). "Ian Hamilton Finlay: A Visual Primer": Yves Abrioux. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (4):406.
     
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  21.  22
    James R. Hamilton (2007). The Art of Theater. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Hamilton argues that theatrical performances have always been regarded as works produced for inspection and evaluation in their own right. The reason this has been obscured is the enormously successful text-based literary tradition in modern European theater. To show why this is as it should be, Hamilton shows how theater's spectators pick out, grasp, and assess performances without reference to the texts they employ, even within that successful literary tradition.
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  22.  65
    Andrew Hamilton & Christopher Dimond (2012). Groups, Individuals, and Evolutionary Restraints: The Making of the Contemporary Debate Over Group Selection. Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):299-312.
    Groups, individuals, and evolutionary restraints : the making of the contemporary debate over group selection Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-14 DOI 10.1007/s10539-011-9255-5 Authors Andrew Hamilton, Center for Biology and Society, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA Christopher C. Dimond, Center for Biology and Society, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA Journal Biology and Philosophy Online ISSN 1572-8404 Print ISSN 0169-3867.
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  23.  73
    A. G. Hamilton (1978). Logic for Mathematicians. Cambridge University Press.
    Intended for logicians and mathematicians, this text is based on Dr. Hamilton's lectures to third and fourth year undergraduates in mathematics at the ...
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  24. James R. Hamilton (2009). Drama. In Higgins Davies (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Aesthetics.
    Hamilton explains why "drama" is a category of literature rather than of theater, even though it is appropriate to describe many theatrical performances as "dramatic." Consideration of the possibilities of theatrical performance are especially important to this category of literature, but need not be (and often are not) decisive in constraining interpretations of dramatic works.
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  25.  35
    Sue Hamilton (2001). Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    India has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thought, spanning some two and a half millenia and encompassing several major religious traditions. Now, in this intriguing introduction to Indian philosophy, the diversity of Indian thought is emphasized. It is structured around six schools of thought that have received classic status. Sue Hamilton explores how the traditions have attempted to understand the nature of reality in terms of inner or spiritual quest and introduces distinctively Indian concepts, such as (...)
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  26. James R. Hamilton (2010). Narrative, Fiction, Imagination. In Pokorny Kotatko (ed.), Fictionality-Possibility-Reality.
    Hamilton argues that narratives engage our imaginations not so much by having us pretend the events they depict are true or present as by having us engage in a kind of anticipation of events to come. The idea is that the grasp of a narratively structured presentation is explained in very much the same way any sequence of events, considered as a sequence, is grasped.
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  27. Grant Hamilton (2011). On Representation: Deleuze and Coetzee on the Colonized Subject. Editions Rodopi.
    In this important new study, Hamilton establishes and develops innovative links between the sites of postcolonial literary theory, the fiction of the South African/Australian academic and Nobel Prize-winning writer J.M. Coetzee, and the work of the French poststructuralist philosopher Gilles Deleuze. Centering on the key postcolonial problematic of representation, Hamilton argues that if one approaches the colonial subject through Gilles Deleuze’s rewriting of subjectivity, then a transcendent configuration of the colonial subject is revealed. Importantly, it is this rendition (...)
     
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  28. James R. Hamilton (2007). Theatrical Space. Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism 31 (2):21-47.
    Hamilton shows how awareness of the uses of space -- in particular uses of space in which to stage an event of any kind -- enable spectators to pick out characters, props, and the like across performances within production runs, across production runs, and even across productions employing different scripts. The key ideas of object identification are taken both from the philosophical and the empirical literature and are treated as epistemic ideas rather than metaphysical conceptions.
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  29. James R. Hamilton (2006). Understanding Plays. In Saltz Krasner (ed.), Staging Philosophy.
    Hamilton argues that there is a level of understanding of theatrical performances, and narrative performances in particular (called "plays"), that does not require grasp of the large-scale aesthetic features that usually inform the structure of what is presented. This "basic understanding" is required for any spectator to go on to have a deeper understanding and, so, grounds any spectator's understanding of the larger-scale features of a performance.
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  30.  5
    Ian McPhee, V. Smallwood & S. Woodford (2004). Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 20: The British Museum 10: Fragments From Sir William Hamilton's Second Collection of Vases Recovered From the Wreck of HMS Colossus. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:212.
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  31. Ian McPhee (2004). (V.) Smallwood and (S.) Woodford Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 20: The British Museum. London: British Museum Press, 2003. Pp. 141, Pls A-H (Col.) + 86. £85. 071412236X.(V.) Smallwood and (S.) Woodford Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 10: Fragments From Sir William Hamilton's Second Collection of Vases Recovered From the Wreck of HMS Colossus. London: British Museum Press, 2003. Pp. 141, Pls A-H (Col.) + 86. £85. 071412236X. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:212-213.
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  32. Jonathan Birch (2014). Hamilton's Rule and Its Discontents. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (2):381-411.
    In an incendiary 2010 Nature article, M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita, and E. O. Wilson present a savage critique of the best-known and most widely used framework for the study of social evolution, W. D. Hamilton’s theory of kin selection. More than a hundred biologists have since rallied to the theory’s defence, but Nowak et al. maintain that their arguments ‘stand unrefuted’. Here I consider the most contentious claim Nowak et al. defend: that Hamilton’s rule, the core (...)
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  33.  22
    Luca Sciortino (2016). On Ian Hacking’s Notion of Style of Reasoning. Erkenntnis:1-22.
    The analytical notion of ‘scientific style of reasoning’, introduced by Ian Hacking in the middle of the 1980s, has become widespread in the literature of the history and philosophy of science. However, scholars have rarely made explicit the philosophical assumptions and the research objectives underlying the notion of style: what are its philosophical roots? How does the notion of style fit into the area of research of historical epistemology? What does a comparison between Hacking’s project on styles of thinking and (...)
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  34.  38
    Alexander Gersten (2011). Tensor Lagrangians, Lagrangians Equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation and Relativistic Dynamics. Foundations of Physics 41 (1):88-98.
    We deal with Lagrangians which are not the standard scalar ones. We present a short review of tensor Lagrangians, which generate massless free fields and the Dirac field, as well as vector and pseudovector Lagrangians for the electric and magnetic fields of Maxwell’s equations with sources. We introduce and analyse Lagrangians which are equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and recast them to relativistic equations.
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  35.  32
    C. D. Bailey (2004). Hamilton and the Law of Varying Action Revisited. Foundations of Physics 34 (9):1385-1406.
    According to history texts, philosophers searched for a unifying natural law whereby natural phenomena and numbers are related. More than 2300 years ago, Aristotle postulated that nature requires minimum energy. More than 220 years ago, Euler applied the minimum energy postulate. More than 200 years ago, Lagrange provided a mathematical “proof” of the postulate for conservative systems. The resulting Principle of Least Action served only to derive the differential equations of motion of a conservative system. Then, 170 years ago, (...) presented what he claimed to be a “general method in dynamics.” Hamilton's resulting “Law of Varying Action” was supposed to apply to both conservative and non-conservative systems and was supposed to yield either the differential equations of motion or the integrals of those differential equations. However, no direct evaluation of the integrals of motion ever resulted from Hamilton's law of varying action. In 1975, a scant 29 years ago, following five years of controversy with engineer mechanicians, Dr. Wolfgang Yourgrau, Editor, Foundations of Physics, published my first paper based on Aristotle's postulate, without mathematical proof. That and subsequent papers present, through applications, a true “general method in dynamics.” In this essay, I present the mathematical proof that is missing from my 1975 and subsequent papers. Six fundamental integrals of analytical mechanics are derived from Aristotle's postulate. First, however, Hamilton must be revisited to show why his H function and his “force function” prevents the law of varying action from being the general method in dynamics that he claimed it to be. I have found that Hamilton’s Law of Varying Action (HLVA), as Hamilton presented it, cannot be applied to systems for which the force function is non-integrable. In 1972, Dr. B.E. Gatewood and Dr. D.P. Beres (then a graduate student) discovered that the end-point term associated with the principle of least action does not vanish. I named the new equation, “the general energy equation.” In 1973, because I was doing with it what Hamilton claimed could be done with HLVA, I simply assumed that this new equation was HLVA. I gave the new equation the misnomer HLVA. In 2001, I learned that I had made a grave mistake. I found that HLVA is at most a special case of the general energy equation. My interpretation of Aristotle's postulate permits one to by-pass the differential equations of motion completely for both conservative and non-conservative systems (no calculus of variations). (shrink)
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  36.  17
    María Laura Martínez (2010). Ontología histórica Y nominalismo dinámico: La propuesta de Ian Hacking para las ciencias humanas. Cinta de Moebio 39:130-141.
    En los últimos años Ian Hacking se ha dedicado a trabajar principalmente acerca de las ciencias humanas. El objetivo de este artículo es presentar algunas de las nociones acuñadas por el filósofo canadiense -fundamentalmente las de ontología histórica y nominalismo dinámico- para dicho ámbito. A par..
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  37.  14
    Philippe Choquard (2001). The Homogeneous Hamilton–Jacobi and Bernoulli Equations Revisited. Foundations of Physics 31 (4):623-640.
    The one-dimensional case of the homogeneous Hamilton–Jacobi and Bernoulli equations St $${\raise0.7ex\hbox{$1$} \!\mathord{\left/ {\vphantom {1 2}}\right.\kern-0em}\!\lower0.7ex\hbox{$2$}}$$ S x 2 =0, where S(x, t) is Hamilton's principal function of a free particle and also Bernoulli's momentum potential of a perfect liquid, is considered. Non-elementary solutions are looked for in terms of odd power series in t with x-dependent coefficients and even power series in x with t-dependent coefficients. In both cases, and depending upon initial conditions, unexpected regularities are observed (...)
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  38.  24
    Gerald A. Cory (2002). Maclean's Evolutionary Neuroscience, the Csn Model and Hamilton's Rule: Some Developmental, Clinical, and Social Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (1):151-181.
    Paul MacLean, founder and long-time chief ofthe Laboratory of Brain Evolution and Behavior,National Institutes of Health, is a pioneeringfigure in the emergent field of evolutionaryneuroscience. His influence has been widelyfelt in the development of biologicalpsychiatry and has led to a considerableliterature on evolutionary approaches toclinical issues. MacLean's work is alsoenjoying a resurgence of interest in academicareas of neuroscience and evolutionarypsychology which have previously shown littleinterest or knowledge of his extensive work. This chapter builds on MacLean's work to bringtogether new insights (...)
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  39. Dino Buzzetti (1973). La teoria della quantificazione del predicato di William Hamilton e la rinascita della logica. Rivista di Filosofia 64 (4):295-337.
    Sir William Hamilton's theory of the quantification of the predicate is presented and discussed with reference to the contemporary debate on logic.
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  40. Jonathan H. Pye & Ian T. Ramsey (1979). A Bibliography of the Published Works [of] Ian Thomas Ramsey.
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  41. John Stuart Mill (1979). An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy and of the Principal Philosophical Questions Discussed in His Writings. University of Toronto Press.
  42. Ann Milliken Pederson (2004). "Writing the Agenda," Summary and Response to the Panel Participants: V. V. Raman, Grace Wolf-Chase, Ian Barbour, Vitor Westhelle. Zygon 39 (2):379-382.
    . This essay highlights the basic issues, goals, and questions for the future of ZCRS.
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  43. James Hutchison Stirling (1865). Sir William Hamilton: The Philosophy of Perception.
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  44. John Veitch (1883). Hamilton. Mind 8 (30):289-291.
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  45. Henry Calderwood (1861). The Philosophy of the Infinite, with Special Reference to the Theories of Sir W. Hamilton and M. Cousin.
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  46. James Hutchison Stirling (1990). Sir William Hamilton Being the Philosophy of Perception, an Analysis. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  47. John Veitch (1883). Sir William Hamilton, the Man and His Philosophy, 2 Lects.
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  48. Nils Kürbis (2016). Some Comments on Ian Rumfitt’s Bilateralism. Journal of Philosophical Logic 45 (6):623-644.
    Ian Rumfitt has proposed systems of bilateral logic for primitive speech acts of assertion and denial, with the purpose of ‘exploring the possibility of specifying the classically intended senses for the connectives in terms of their deductive use’ : 810f). Rumfitt formalises two systems of bilateral logic and gives two arguments for their classical nature. I assess both arguments and conclude that only one system satisfies the meaning-theoretical requirements Rumfitt imposes in his arguments. I then formalise an intuitionist system of (...)
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  49. Jon Robson (2012). Do Possible Worlds Compromise God's Beauty? A Reply to Mark Ian Thomas Robson. Religious Studies 48 (4):515 - 532.
    In a recent article Mark Ian Thomas Robson argues that there is a clear contradiction between the view that possible worlds are a part of God's nature and the theologically pivotal, but philosophically neglected, claim that God is perfectly beautiful. In this article I show that Robson's argument depends on several key assumptions that he fails to justify and as such that there is reason to doubt the soundness of his argument. I also demonstrate that if Robson's argument were sound (...)
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  50.  65
    Jonathan Birch (2016). Hamilton's Two Conceptions of Social Fitness. Philosophy of Science.
    Hamilton introduced two conceptions of social fitness, which he called neighbour-modulated fitness and inclusive fitness. Although he regarded them as formally equivalent, a re-analysis of his own argument for their equivalence brings out two important assumptions on which it rests: weak additivity and actor's control. When weak additivity breaks down, neither fitness concept is appropriate in its original form. When actor's control breaks down, neighbour-modulated fitness may be appropriate, but inclusive fitness is not. Yet I argue that, despite its (...)
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