Search results for 'Ian Hamilton' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Alastair Hamilton (2008). Heterodoxy in Early Modern Science and Religion. Edited by John Brooke and Ian Maclean. Heythrop Journal 49 (4):678–679.score: 360.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Joakim Sandberg, Carmen Juravle, Ted Martin Hedesström & Ian Hamilton (2009). The Heterogeneity of Socially Responsible Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):519 - 533.score: 240.0
    Many writers have commented on the heterogeneity of the socially responsible investment (SRI) movement. However, few have actually tried to understand and explain it, and even fewer have discussed whether the opposite – standardisation – is possible and desirable. In this article, we take a broader perspective on the issue of the heterogeneity of SRI. We distinguish between four levels on which heterogeneity can be found: the terminological, definitional, strategic and practical. Whilst there is much talk about the definitional ambiguities (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ian Smith, Justin Goodman, Raj Ramanathapillai, Shalin Gala, John Sorenson, Bill Hamilton, Ana Morron, Julie Andrzejewski, Elliot M. Katz & Colman McCarthy (2013). Animals and War: Confronting the Military-Animal Industrial Complex. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ontario Hamilton (2000). Canada. Art Gallery of Hamilton. In Mike Crang & N. J. Thrift (eds.), Thinking Space. Routledge.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. G. J. Hamilton & A. H. Smith (1901). Gavin Hamilton's Letters to Charles Townley. Journal of Hellenic Studies 21:306.score: 180.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lawrence Hamilton (2009). Human Needs and Political Judgment Lawrence Hamilton. In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan. 40.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Brian E. Butler (2009). Neo-Neo-Classicism: The Artistic and Political Challenge of Ian Hamilton Finlay, Geometer. Geometer.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Harry Gilonis (2000). Knowing the Land Where Neon Blooms: Ian Hamilton Finlay's 1999 Installation in Erfurt. Angelaki 5 (1):115-118.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Andrew Hamilton & Christopher Dimond (2012). Groups, Individuals, and Evolutionary Restraints: The Making of the Contemporary Debate Over Group Selection. Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):299-312.score: 60.0
    Groups, individuals, and evolutionary restraints : the making of the contemporary debate over group selection Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-14 DOI 10.1007/s10539-011-9255-5 Authors Andrew Hamilton, Center for Biology and Society, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA Christopher C. Dimond, Center for Biology and Society, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA Journal Biology and Philosophy Online ISSN 1572-8404 Print ISSN 0169-3867.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. A. G. Hamilton (1978). Logic for Mathematicians. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Intended for logicians and mathematicians, this text is based on Dr. Hamilton's lectures to third and fourth year undergraduates in mathematics at the ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Sue Hamilton (2001). Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    India has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thought, spanning some two and a half millenia and encompassing several major religious traditions. Now, in this intriguing introduction to Indian philosophy, the diversity of Indian thought is emphasized. It is structured around six schools of thought that have received classic status. Sue Hamilton explores how the traditions have attempted to understand the nature of reality in terms of inner or spiritual quest and introduces distinctively Indian concepts, such as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. James R. Hamilton (2007). The Art of Theater. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 60.0
    Hamilton argues that theatrical performances have always been regarded as works produced for inspection and evaluation in their own right. The reason this has been obscured is the enormously successful text-based literary tradition in modern European theater. To show why this is as it should be, Hamilton shows how theater's spectators pick out, grasp, and assess performances without reference to the texts they employ, even within that successful literary tradition.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. James R. Hamilton (2009). Drama. In Higgins Davies (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Aesthetics.score: 60.0
    Hamilton explains why "drama" is a category of literature rather than of theater, even though it is appropriate to describe many theatrical performances as "dramatic." Consideration of the possibilities of theatrical performance are especially important to this category of literature, but need not be (and often are not) decisive in constraining interpretations of dramatic works.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. James R. Hamilton (2010). Narrative, Fiction, Imagination. In Pokorny Kotatko (ed.), Fictionality-Possibility-Reality.score: 60.0
    Hamilton argues that narratives engage our imaginations not so much by having us pretend the events they depict are true or present as by having us engage in a kind of anticipation of events to come. The idea is that the grasp of a narratively structured presentation is explained in very much the same way any sequence of events, considered as a sequence, is grasped.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Grant Hamilton (2011). On Representation: Deleuze and Coetzee on the Colonized Subject. Editions Rodopi.score: 60.0
    In this important new study, Hamilton establishes and develops innovative links between the sites of postcolonial literary theory, the fiction of the South African/Australian academic and Nobel Prize-winning writer J.M. Coetzee, and the work of the French poststructuralist philosopher Gilles Deleuze. Centering on the key postcolonial problematic of representation, Hamilton argues that if one approaches the colonial subject through Gilles Deleuze’s rewriting of subjectivity, then a transcendent configuration of the colonial subject is revealed. Importantly, it is this rendition (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. James R. Hamilton (2007). Theatrical Space. Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism 31 (2):21-47.score: 60.0
    Hamilton shows how awareness of the uses of space -- in particular uses of space in which to stage an event of any kind -- enable spectators to pick out characters, props, and the like across performances within production runs, across production runs, and even across productions employing different scripts. The key ideas of object identification are taken both from the philosophical and the empirical literature and are treated as epistemic ideas rather than metaphysical conceptions.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. James R. Hamilton (2006). Understanding Plays. In Saltz Krasner (ed.), Staging Philosophy.score: 60.0
    Hamilton argues that there is a level of understanding of theatrical performances, and narrative performances in particular (called "plays"), that does not require grasp of the large-scale aesthetic features that usually inform the structure of what is presented. This "basic understanding" is required for any spectator to go on to have a deeper understanding and, so, grounds any spectator's understanding of the larger-scale features of a performance.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ian McPhee, V. Smallwood & S. Woodford (2004). Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 20: The British Museum 10: Fragments From Sir William Hamilton's Second Collection of Vases Recovered From the Wreck of HMS Colossus. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:212.score: 36.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ian McPhee (2004). (V.) Smallwood and (S.) Woodford Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 20: The British Museum. London: British Museum Press, 2003. Pp. 141, Pls A-H (Col.) + 86. £85. 071412236X.(V.) Smallwood and (S.) Woodford Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, Great Britain 10: Fragments From Sir William Hamilton's Second Collection of Vases Recovered From the Wreck of HMS Colossus. London: British Museum Press, 2003. Pp. 141, Pls A-H (Col.) + 86. £85. 071412236X. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:212-213.score: 36.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Andrew Hamilton (2007). Laws of Biology, Laws of Nature: Problems and (Dis)Solutions. Philosophy Compass 2 (3):592–610.score: 30.0
    This article serves as an introduction to the laws-of-biology debate. After introducing the main issues in an introductory section, arguments for and against laws of biology are canvassed in Section 2. In Section 3, the debate is placed in wider epistemological context by engaging a group of scholars who have shifted the focus away from the question of whether there are laws of biology and toward offering good accounts of explanation(s) in the biological sciences. Section 4 introduces two relatively new (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. William P. Bechtel & Andrew Hamilton (2007). Reduction, Integration, and the Unity of Science: Natural, Behavioral, and Social Sciences and the Humanities. In T. Kuipers (ed.), Philosophy of Science: Focal Issues (Volume 1 of the Handbook of the Philosophy of Science). Elsevier.score: 30.0
    1. A Historical Look at Unity 2. Field Guide to Modern Concepts of Reduction and Unity 3. Kitcher's Revisionist Account of Unification 4. Critics of Unity 5. Integration Instead of Unity 6. Reduction via Mechanisms 7. Case Studies in Reduction and Unification across the Disciplines.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Christopher Hamilton (2008). Raimond Gaita on Saints, Love and Human Preciousness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (2):181 - 195.score: 30.0
    Raimond Gaita’s work in moral philosophy is unusual and important in focusing on the concept of sainthood. Drawing partly on the work of George Orwell, and partly on the life and work of Simone Weil, as well as on further material, I argue that Gaita’s use of this notion to help make sense of the concept of human preciousness is unconvincing, not least because he does not properly explore the figure and psychology of the saint in any detail. I relatedly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Chris Hamilton (2006). Biodiversity, Biopiracy and Benefits: What Allegations of Biopiracy Tell Us About Intellectual Property. Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):158–173.score: 30.0
  24. Andy Hamilton (1998). False Memory Syndrome and the Authority of Personal Memory-Claims: A Philosophical Perspective. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (4):283-297.score: 30.0
  25. A. Hamilton (1995). A New Look at Personal Identity. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (180):332-349.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Andy Hamilton (2003). 'Scottish Commonsense' About Memory: A Defence of Thomas Reid's Direct Knowledge Account. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):229-245.score: 30.0
    Reid rejects the image theory --the representative or indirect realist position--that memory-judgements are inferred from or otherwise justified by a present image or introspectible state. He also rejects the trace theory , which regards memories as essentially traces in the brain. In contrast he argues for a direct knowledge account in which personal memory yields unmediated knowledge of the past. He asserts the reliability of memory, not in currently fashionable terms as a reliable belief-forming process, but more elusively as a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Christopher Hamilton (2000). Nietzsche on Nobility and the Affirmation of Life. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (2):169-193.score: 30.0
    In this paper I explore Nietzsche's thinking on the notions of nobility and the affirmation of life and I subject his reflections on these to criticism. I argue that we can find at least two understandings of these notions in Nietzsche's work which I call a 'worldly' and an 'inward' conception and I explain what I mean by each of these. Drawing on Homer and Dostoyevsky, the work of both of whom was crucial for Nietzsche in developing and exploring his (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Andy Hamilton (2007). Music and the Aural Arts. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):46-63.score: 30.0
    The visual arts include painting, sculpture, photography, video, and film. But many people would argue that music is the universal or only art of sound. In the modernist era, Western art music has incorporated unpitched sounds or ‘noise’, and I pursue the question of whether this process allows space for a non-musical soundart. Are there non-musical arts of sound—is there an art phonography, for instance, to parallel art photography? At the same time, I attempt a characterization of music, contrasting acoustic, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Christopher Hamilton (1999). The Nature of Evil a Reply to Garrard. Philosophical Explorations 2 (2):122 – 138.score: 30.0
    In this article I explore Eve Garrard's recent account of evil and some work of Colin McGinn's on the same topic. I argue that neither provides a satisfactory account of evil. In doing so, I discuss the role of conscience, sadism and indifference to the suffering of others in evil-doing. I argue that the evil-doer can be admirable and I explore the relation between agent and action in the evil deed.The idea that evil is mysterious is considered and I conclude (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. J. Brooke Hamilton & Stephen B. Knouse (2001). Multinational Enterprise Decision Principles for Dealing with Cross Cultural Ethical Conflicts. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):77 - 94.score: 30.0
    Cross cultural ethical conflicts are a major challenge for managers of multinational corporations (MNEs) when an MNE''s business practices and a host country''s practices differ. We develop a set of decision principles to help MNE managers deal with these conflicts and illustrate with examples of ethical conflicts faced by MNEs doing business in contemporary Russia (DeGeorge, 1994). We discuss the generalizability of the principles by comparing them to the Donaldson (1989) and Buller and Kohls (1997) decision models. Finally we discuss (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Andy Hamilton (2000). The Authority of Avowals and the Concept of Belief. European Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):20-39.score: 30.0
  32. A. Hamilton (2000). The Art of Improvisation and the Aesthetics of Imperfection. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (1):168-185.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Richard Paul Hamilton (2006). Love as a Contested Concept. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (3):239–254.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Walton H. Hamilton (1938). The Path of Due Process of Law. Ethics 48 (3):269-296.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Andy Hamilton (2003). The Art of Recording and the Aesthetics of Perfection. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):345-362.score: 30.0
    Recording has transformed the nature of music as an art by reconfiguring the opposition between the aesthetics of perfection and imperfection. A precursor article, ‘The Art of Improvisation and the Aesthetics of Imperfection’, contrasted the perfectionist aesthetic of the ‘work-concept’ with the imperfectionist aesthetic of improvisation. Imperfectionist approaches to recording are purist in wanting to maintain the diachronic and synchronic integrity of the performance, which perfectionist recording creatively subverts through mixing and editing. But a purist transparency thesis cannot evade the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Richard Paul Hamilton (2004). Might There Be Legal Reasons? Res Publica 10 (4):425-447.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I consider and question an influential position in Anglo-American philosophy of action which suggests that reasons for action must be internal, in other words that statements about reasons for actions must make reference to some fact or set of facts about the agent and her desires. I do so by asking whether legal requirements could be considered as reasons for actions and if in so considering them one must translate statements about legal requirements into statements about the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Andy Hamilton (1990). Ernst Mach and the Elimination of Subjectivity. Ratio 3 (2):117-135.score: 30.0
  38. Andy Hamilton (1991). Anscombian and Cartesian Scepticism. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (162):39-54.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Spuma M. Rao & J. Brooke Hamilton (1996). The Effect of Published Reports of Unethical Conduct on Stock Prices. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (12):1321 - 1330.score: 30.0
    This study adds to the empirical evidence supporting a significant connection between ethics and profitability by examining the connection between published reports of unethical behaviour by publicly traded U.S. and multinational firms and the performance of their stock. Using reports of unethical behaviour published in the Wall Street Journal from 1989 to 1993, the analysis shows that the actual stock performance for those companies was lower than the expected market adjusted returns. Unethical conduct by firms which is discovered and publicized (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Charles Morris & Daniel J. Hamilton (1965). Aesthetics, Signs, and Icons. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 25 (3):356-364.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Marilyn Hamilton (2007). Approaching Homelessness: An Integral Re-Frame. World Futures 63 (2):107 – 126.score: 30.0
    This article explores a metaview of the many faces of homelessness. It analyzes an evolutionary meaning of home and suggests that ever-complexifying life conditions influence how societies enforce conformity to the status quo of homefulness. It goes on to describe how homelessness might be reframed as a complex adaptive form of survival for diversity generators who cannot or will not conform to the status quo. The article proposes an integral framework on which intervention strategies could be structured to provide evolutionary, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. James Jay Hamilton (1978). Hobbes's Study and the Hardwick Library. Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (4):445-453.score: 30.0
  43. Alastair Hamilton (2007). Machiavelli and Empire. By Mikael hörnqvistMachiavelli, Hobbes, and the Formation of a Liberal Republicanism in England. By Vickie B. Sullivanmachiavelli's Liberal Republican Legacy. Edited by Paul A. Rahe. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (6):1000–1001.score: 30.0
  44. Melinda Fagan, Patrick Forber, Vivette GarcÍa Deister, Matthew H. Haber, Andrew Hamilton & Grant Yamashita (2005). Meeting Report: First ISHPSSB Off-Year Workshop. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):927-929.score: 30.0
  45. Patricia J. Faulkender, Lillian M. Range, Michelle Hamilton, Marlow Strehlow, Sarah Jackson, Elmer Blanchard & Paul Dean (1994). The Case of the Stolen Psychology Test: An Analysis of an Actual Cheating Incident. Ethics and Behavior 4 (3):209 – 217.score: 30.0
    We examined the attitudes of 600 students in large introductory algebra and psychology classes toward an actual or hypothetical cheating incident and the subsequent retake procedure. Overall, 57% of students in one class and 49Y0 in the other reported that they either cheated or would have cheated if given the opportunity. More men (59%) than women (53%) reported cheating or potential cheating. Students who had actually experienced a retake procedure to handle cheating were more satisfied with such a procedure than (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Alastair Hamilton (2007). Malleus Maleficarum. By Henricus Institoris, O. P. And Jacobus Sprenger, O. P. Edited and Translated by Christopher S. MacKay, Heresy, Magic, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe. By Gary K. Waite and Demonic Possession and Exorcism in Early Modern France. By Sarah Ferber. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (3):477–479.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Alastair Hamilton (2007). Histories of Heresy in Early Modern Europe: For, Against, and Beyond Persecution and Toleration. Edited by John Christian Laursen. Heythrop Journal 48 (1):134–135.score: 30.0
  48. Carol Hamilton (1955). Picasso at Antibes. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 13 (4):478-485.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. J. Brooke Hamilton & David Strutton (1994). Two Practical Guidelines for Resolving Truth-Telling Problems. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (11):899 - 912.score: 30.0
    The news reminds us almost daily that the truth is apparently not highly valued by many in business. This paper develops two prescriptive standards — the Expectation and Reputation guidelines — that may help businesspeople avoid violating clearly accepted truth standards. The guidelines also assist in determining whether truth is required in circumstances where honesty seems in conflict with the practical demands of business. A discussion of why, when and how these guidelines may be applied to facilitate truth-telling by business (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Alastair Hamilton (2007). Reformation and the Culture of Persuasion. By Andrew Pettegree; the Protestant Clergy of Early Modern Europe. Edited by C. Scott Dixon and Luise Schorn-Schütte and the Gospel and Henry VIII. Evangelicals in the Early English Reformation. By Alec Ryrie. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (2):303–305.score: 30.0
1 — 50 / 999