33 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Ian James Kidd (Durham University)
  1. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Epistemic Vices in Public Debate: The Case of New Atheism. In Christopher Cotter & Philip Quadrio (eds.), New Atheism's Legacy: Critical Perspectives from Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Springer.
    Although critics often argue that the new atheists are arrogant, dogmatic, closed-minded and so on, there is currently no philosophical analysis of this complaint - which I will call 'the vice charge' - and no assessment of whether it is merely a rhetorical aside or a substantive objection in its own right. This Chapter therefore uses the resources of virtue epistemology to articulate this 'vice charge' and to argue that critics are right to imply that new atheism is intrinsically epistemically (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Feyerabend on Politics, Education, and Scientific Culture. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science.
    The purpose of this paper is to offer a sympathetic reconstruction of the political thought of Paul Feyerabend. Using a critical discussion of the idea of the ‘free society’ it is suggested that his political thought is best understood in terms of three thematic concerns – liberation, hegemony, and the authority of science – and that the political significance of those claims become clear when they are considered in the context of his educational views. It emerges that Feyerabend is best (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Phenomenology, Naturalism, and Religious Experience. In Alasdair Coles & Fraser Watts (eds.), Religion and Neurology. Cambridge University Press.
    Contemporary philosophical debates about the competing merits of neurological and phenomenological approaches to understanding both psychiatric illness and religious experience—and, indeed, the relationship, if any, between psychiatric illness and religious experience. In this chapter, I propose that both psychiatric illness and religious experiences - at least in some of their diverse forms - are best understood phenomenologically in terms of radical changes in a person's 'existential feelings', in the sense articulated by Matthew Ratcliffe. If so, explanatory priority should be assigned (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Transformative Suffering and the Cultivation of Virtue. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology.
    Anastasia Scrutton offers an attractive account of two Christian theologies of depression and argues, cogently and compellingly, that forms of potentially transformative theologies are therapeutically and philosophically superior. My double aim here is to try to cash out the operative notion of 'transformation' by focusing on two features: first its multimodal character (ethical, aesthetic, existential, spiritual) and, second, the theme of a realisation of 'dependence', 'grounding', or of being 'anchored' in the world. I suggest that these two themes of multimodality (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). ‘“What’s So Great About Science?” Feyerabend on the Ideological Use and Abuse of Science. In Elena Aronova & Simone Turchetti (eds.), The Politics of Science Studies.
    It is very well known that from the late-1960s onwards Feyerabend began to radically challenge some deeply-held ideas about the history and methodology of the sciences. It is equally well known that, from around the same period, he also began to radically challenge wider claims about the value and place of the sciences within modern societies, for instance by calling for the separation of science and the state and by questioning the idea that the sciences served to liberate and ameliorate (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Was Sir William Crookes Epistemically Virtuous? Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences.
    The aim of this paper is to use Sir William Crookes’ researches into psychical phenomena as a sustained case study of the role of epistemic virtues within scientific enquiry. Despite growing interest in virtues in science, there are few integrated historical and philosophical studies, and even fewer studies focusing on controversial or ‘fringe’ sciences—like psychical research—where, one might suppose, certain epistemic virtues (like open-mindedness and tolerance) may be subjected to sterner tests. Using the virtue of epistemic courage as my focus, (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ian James Kidd (2013). A Phenomenological Challenge to 'Enlightened Secularism'. Religious Studies 49 (3):377-398.
    This article challenges Philip Kitcher’s recent proposals for an ‘enlightened secularism’. I use William James’s theory of the emotions and his related discussion of ‘temperaments’ to argue that religious and naturalistic commitments are grounded in tacit, inarticulate ways that one finds oneself in a world. This indicates that, in many cases, religiosity and naturalism are grounded not in rational and evidential considerations, but in a tacit and implicit sense of reality which is disclosed through phenomenological enquiry. Once the foundational role (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ian James Kidd (2013). A Pluralist Challenge to 'Integrative Medicine': Feyerabend and Popper on the Cognitive Value of Alternative Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):392–400.
    This paper is a critique of ‘integrative medicine’ as an ideal of medical progress on the grounds that it fails to realise the cognitive value of alternative medicine. After a brief account of the cognitive value of alternative medicine, I outline the form of ‘integrative medicine’ defended by the late Stephen Straus, former director of the US National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Straus’ account is then considered in the light of Zuzana Parusnikova’s recent criticism of ‘integrative medicine’ and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ian James Kidd (2013). Emotion, Religious Practice, and Cosmopolitan Secularism. Religious Studies:1-18.
    Philip Kitcher has recently proposed a form of which he suggests could enable the members of a future secular society to continue to access and benefit from the moral and existential resources of the world's religions. I criticize this proposal by appeal to contemporary work on the role of emotion and practice in religious commitment. Using the work of John Cottingham and Mark Wynn, two objections are offered to the cosmopolitan secularists' claim that the moral resources of a religion could (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ian James Kidd (2013). Feyerabend on Science and Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):407-422.
    This article offers a sympathetic interpretation of Paul Feyerabend's remarks on science and education. I present a formative episode in the development of his educational ideas—the ‘Berkeley experience'—and describe how it affected his views on the place of science within modern education. It emerges that Feyerabend arrived at a conception of education closely related to that of Michael Oakeshott and Martin Heidegger—that of education as ‘releasement’. Each of those three figures argued that the purpose of education was not to induct (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ian James Kidd (2013). Feyerabend on the Ineffability of Reality. In Asa Kasher & Jeanine Diller (eds.), Models of God and Other Ultimate Realities. Kluwer. 849-860..
    This paper explores the account of ‘ultimate reality’ developed in the later philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. The paper has five main parts, this introduction being the first. Part two surveys Feyerabend’s later work, locates it relative to his more familiar earlier work in the philosophy of science, and identifies the motivations informing his interest in ‘ultimate reality’. Part three offers an account of Feyerabend’s later metaphysics, focusing on the account given in his final book, Conquest of Abundance. Part four then (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ian James Kidd (2013). Historical Contingency and the Impact of Scientific Imperialism. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):317–326.
    In a recent article in this journal, Steve Clarke and Adrian Walsh propose a normative basis for John Dupré’s criticisms of scientific imperialism, namely, that scientific imperialism can cause a discipline to fail to progress in ways that it otherwise would have. This proposal is based on two presuppositions: one, that scientific disciplines have developmental teleologies, and two, that these teleologies are optimal. I argue that we should reject both of these presuppositions and so conclude that Clarke and Walsh’s proposal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ian James Kidd (2013). Is Naturalism Bleak? Environmental Values 22 (6):689-702.
    Although Cottingham and Holland make a persuasive case for the claim that it is difficult to situate a meaningful life within a Darwinian naturalistic cosmology, this paper argues that their case should be modified in response to the apparent fact that certain persons seem genuinely not to experience the ‘bleakness’ that they describe. Although certain of these cases will reflect an incomplete appreciation of the existential implications of Darwinian naturalism, at least some of those cases may be genuine. The resulting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Ian James Kidd (2013). Oswald Spengler. In Gregory Claey (ed.), Encyclopaedia of Modern Political Thought. CQ Press.
    I provide an account of the political and philosophical thought of Oswald Spengler.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ian James Kidd (2013). Paul Feyerabend, Against Method, 4th Ed. (London: Verso, 2010). 296, Price $22.95 Pb. Paul Feyerabend, The Tyranny of Science, Ed. Eric Oberheim (London: Polity, 2011). 153, Price $13.18 Pb. [REVIEW] Philosophical Investigations 36 (1):90-94.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ian James Kidd (2013). The Making of Modern Science: Science, Technology, Medicine and Modernity: 1789–1914. Annals of Science 70 (1):101-104.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ian James Kidd (2012). Biopiracy and the Ethics of Medical Heritage: The Case of India's Traditional Knowledge Digital Library'. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (3):175-183.
    Medical humanities have a unique role to play in combating biopiracy. This argument is offered both as a response to contemporary concerns about the ‘value’ and ‘impact’ of the arts and humanities and as a contribution to ongoing legal, political, and ethical debates regarding the status and protection of medical heritage. Medical humanities can contribute to the documentation and safeguarding of a nation or people’s medical heritage, understood as a form of intangible cultural heritage. In so doing it can fulfill (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ian James Kidd (2012). Can Illness Be Edifying? Inquiry 55 (5):496-520.
    Abstract Havi Carel has recently argued that one can be ill and happy. An ill person can ?positively respond? to illness by cultivating ?adaptability? and ?creativity?. I propose that Carel's claim can be augmented by connecting it with virtue ethics. The positive responses which Carel describes are best understood as the cultivation of virtues, and this adds a significant moral aspect to coping with illness. I then defend this claim against two sets of objections and conclude that interpreting Carel's phenomenology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ian James Kidd (2012). Feyerabend, Pseudo-Dionysius, and the Ineffability of Reality. Philosophia 40 (2):365-377.
    This paper explores the influence of the fifth-century Christian Neoplatonist Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite (Denys) on the twentieth-century philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend. I argue that the later Feyerabend took from Denys a metaphysical claim—the ‘doctrine of ineffability’—intended to support epistemic pluralism. The paper has five parts. Part one introduces Denys and Feyerabend’s common epistemological concern to deny the possibility of human knowledge of ultimate reality. Part two examines Denys’ arguments for the ‘ineffability’ of God as presented in On the Divine (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ian James Kidd (2012). Humane Philosophy and the Question of Progress. Ratio 25 (3):277-290.
    According to some recent critics, philosophy has not progressed over the course of its history because it has not exhibited any substantial increase in the stock of human wisdom. I reject this pessimistic conclusion by arguing that such criticisms employ a conception of progress drawn from the sciences which is inapplicable to a humanistic discipline such as philosophy. Philosophy should not be understood as the accumulation of epistemic goods in a manner analogous to the natural sciences. I argue that the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ian James Kidd (2012). Oswald Spengler, Technology, and Human Nature. The European Legacy 17 (1):19 - 31.
    Oswald Spengler (1880?1936) is a neglected figure in the history of European philosophical thought. This article examines the philosophical anthropology developed in his later work, particularly his Man and Technics: A Contribution to a Philosophy of Life (1931). My purpose is twofold: the first is to argue that Spengler's later thought is a response to criticisms of the ?pessimism? of his earlier work, The Decline of the West (1919). Man and Technics overcomes this charge by providing a novel philosophical anthropology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Ian James Kidd (2012). Receptivity to Mystery. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 4 (3):51-68.
    The cultivation of receptivity to the mystery of reality is a central feature of many religious and philosophical traditions, both Western and Asian. This paper considers two contemporary accounts of receptivity to mystery – those of David E. Cooper and John Cottingham – and considers them in light of the problem of loss of receptivity. I argue that a person may lose their receptivity to mystery by embracing what I call a scientistic stance, and the paper concludes by offering two (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ian James Kidd & Guy Bennett-Hunter (eds.) (2012). Mystery and Humility. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    This guest-edited special section explores the related themes of mystery, humility, and religious practice from both the Western and East Asian philosophical traditions. The contributors are David E. Cooper, John Cottingham, Mark Wynn, Graham Parkes, and Ian James Kidd.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ian James Kidd (2011). Objectivity, Abstraction, and the Individual: The Influence of Søren Kierkegaard on Paul Feyerabend. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):125-134.
  25. Ian James Kidd (2011). Pierre Duhem's Epistemic Aims and the Intellectual Virtue of Humility: A Reply to Ivanova. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):185-189.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Ian James Kidd (2011). Three Cheers for Science and Philosophy! Think 10 (29):37-41.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Ian James Kidd (2011). The Contingency of Science and the Future of Philosophy. In Eric Dietrich & Zach Weber (eds.), Philosophy’s Future. 312--328.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Ian James Kidd (2010). Dean Rickles, The Ashgate Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Physics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (3):212-214.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ian James Kidd (2010). Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison, Objectivity Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 29 (3):170-172.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Ian James Kidd (2010). Pluralism and the Problem of Reality in the Later Philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. Dissertation, Durham University
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ian James Kidd (2009). Feyerabend and the Monster 'Science'. Philosophy Now 74:18-20.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ian James Kidd (2009). Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison, Objectivity. Philosophy in Review 29 (3):170.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Ian James Kidd (2008). Method in the Madness – Feyerabend's Philosophical Pluralism. Metascience 17 (3):469-473.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation