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Ian Leask [8]Ian Albert Leask [1]
  1. Ian Leask (2012). Unholy Force: Toland's Leibnizian 'Consummation' of Spinozism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):499-537.
    This article argues that the Fourth and Fifth of John Toland's Letters to Serena are best understood as a creative confrontation of Spinoza and Leibniz ? one in which crucial aspects of Leibniz's thought are extracted from their original context and made to serve a purpose that is ultimately Spinozistic. Accordingly, it suggests that the critique of Spinoza that takes up so much of the fourth Letter, in particular, should be read as a means of `perfecting' Spinoza (via Leibniz), rather (...)
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  2. Ian Leask (2011). Beyond Subjection: Notes on the Later Foucault and Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (s1):57-73.
    This article argues against the doxa that Foucault's analysis of education inevitably undermines self-originating ethical intention on the part of teachers or students. By attending to Foucault's lesser known, later work—in particular, the notion of ‘biopower’ and the deepened level of materiality it entails—the article shows how the earlier Foucauldian conception of power is intensified to such an extent that it overflows its original domain, and comes to ‘infuse’ the subject that might previously have been taken as a mere effect. (...)
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  3. Ian Albert Leask (2011). Being Reconfigured. Cambridge Scholars.
    Being Reconfigured presents some of the most brilliant and audacious theses in recent phenomenological research. Challenging so much post-Heideggerian doxa, it argues against contemporary phenomenology’s denegation of Being, but suggests, as well, that phenomenology itself can provide a viable and fruitful alternative to this impasse. -/- Specifically, Being Reconfigured delineates the source of phenomenology’s ‘refusal’ of Being, in Husserl; the main strands it demonstrates, in Marion and Levinas; and the fundamental problems its entails—in Marion, the necessary retention of a ‘metaphysical’ (...)
     
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  4. Ian Leask (2010). Personation and Immanent Undermining: On Toland's Appearing Lockean. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):231 – 256.
  5. Ian Leask (2007). From Radical Hermeneutics to the Weakness Of God. Philosophy Today 51 (2):216-226.
  6. Ian Leask (2007). Levinas and the Greek Tradition. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):681-687.
  7. Ian Leask (2006). Flesh, Chiasm...Providence? Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 37 (1):5-20.
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  8. Ian Leask (2005). Ethics Overcomes Finitude. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3):447-459.
    This article situates Levinas’s reading of Kant in terms of his opposition to Heidegger. It suggests that, although Levinas and Heidegger both put great stress upon the affective aspect of Kant’s philosophy, ultimately they diverge sharply over the issue of finitude: where Heidegger’s Kant suggests that there is “nothing but finite Dasein,” Levinas stresses the significance of transcending finitude, ethically. In this respect, Levinas’s Kant-reading converges strongly with the interpretation Heidegger so strongly opposed—Cassirer’s. And, as such, Levinas’s anti-Heideggerian position commits (...)
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  9. Ian Leask (2003). Husserl, Givenness, and the Priority of the Self. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (2):141 – 156.
    This article argues that, despite its apparent radicality, Husserl's later, genetic phenomenology ends up confirming and consolidating a very orthodox transcendental egology.First, the article reconstructs an Husserlian phenomenology of givenness; but then, by considering the ambiguous role of intuition, it also establishes (a) the continued prestige of a 'classical' transcendental subject, and (b) the way in which a denial of ontology allows Husserl's transcendental subject to sublate the provocative challenge of primal Gegebenheit .Overall, the article argues that Husserl is subject (...)
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