18 found
Sort by:
See also:
  1. Ian Ravenscroft (2012). Fiction, Imagination, and Ethics. In Robyn Langdon & Catriona Mackenzie (eds.), Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning. Psychology Press. 71.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ian Ravenscroft (2012). What's Darwin Got to Do with It? The Role of Evolutionary Theory in Psychiatry. Biology and Philosophy 27 (3):449-460.
    What’s Darwin got to do with it? The role of evolutionary theory in psychiatry Content Type Journal Article Category Review Essay Pages 1-12 DOI 10.1007/s10539-011-9301-3 Authors Ian Ravenscroft, Philosophy Department, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia Journal Biology and Philosophy Online ISSN 1572-8404 Print ISSN 0169-3867.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ian Ravenscroft (2010). How To Be A Philosopher. Philosophy Now 81:19-20.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ian Ravenscroft (ed.) (2009). Minds, Ethics, and Conditionals: Themes From the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford University Press.
    An illustrious line-up of seventeen philosophers from the USA, the UK, and Australia present new essays on themes from the work of Frank Jackson, which bridges mind, language, logic, metaphysics, and ethics. Central to Jackson's work is an approach to metaphysical issues built on the twin foundations of supervenience and conceptual analysis. In the first part of the book six essays examine this approach and its application to philosophy of mind and philosophy of color. The second part focuses on Jackson's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ian Ravenscroft, Folk Psychology as a Theory. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Many philosophers and cognitive scientists claim that our everyday or "folk" understanding of mental states constitutes a theory of mind. That theory is widely called "folk psychology" (sometimes "commonsense" psychology). The terms in which folk psychology is couched are the familiar ones of "belief" and "desire", "hunger", "pain" and so forth. According to many theorists, folk psychology plays a central role in our capacity to predict and explain the behavior of ourselves and others. However, the nature and status of folk (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Gregory Currie, Ian Ravenscroft & Christoph Hoerl (2005). Récréative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology. Mind and Language 20 (5):559-564.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ian Ravenscroft (2005). Philosophy of Mind: A Beginner's Guide. Oxford University Press.
    Designed specifically for students with no background knowledge in the subject, this accessible introduction covers all of the basic concepts and major theories in the philosophy of mind. Topics discussed include dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, functionalism, the computational theory of mind, connectionism, physicalism, mental causation, and consciousness. The text is enhanced by chapter summaries, a glossary, suggestions for further reading, and self-assessment questions.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ian Ravenscroft (2004). Where Angels Fear to Tread – the Evolution of Language. Biology and Philosophy 19 (1):145-158.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ian Ravenscroft (2003). Simulation, Collapse and Humean Motivation. In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins. 162-174.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft (2002). Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Recreative Minds develops a philosophical theory of imagination that draws upon the latest work in psychology. This theory illuminates the use of imagination in coming to terms with art, its role in enabling us to live as social beings, and the psychological consequences of disordered imagination. The authors offer a lucid exploration of a fascinating subject.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ian Ravenscroft (1999). Predictive Failure. Philosophical Papers 28 (3):143-168.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ian Ravenscroft (1998). Neuroscience and the Mind. Mind and Language 13 (1):132-137.
  13. Ian Ravenscroft (1998). What is It Like to Be Someone Else? Simulation and Empathy. Ratio 11 (2):170-185.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft (1997). Mental Simulation and Motor Imagery. Philosophy of Science 64 (1):161-80.
    Motor imagery typically involves an experience as of moving a body part. Recent studies reveal close parallels between the constraints on motor imagery and those on actual motor performance. How are these parallels to be explained? We advance a simulative theory of motor imagery, modeled on the idea that we predict and explain the decisions of others by simulating their decision-making processes. By proposing that motor imagery is essentially off-line motor action, we explain the tendency of motor imagery to mimic (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ian Ravenscroft (1997). Physical Properties. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):419-431.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ian Ravenscroft (1994). Dennett's Combinatorial Explosion Argument Against Brains in Vats. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (2):233 – 235.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stephen Stich & Ian Ravenscroft (1994). What is Folk Psychology? Cognition 50 (1-3):447-468.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation