Search results for 'Idealism, German History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kathleen Higgins & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (2003). The Age of German Idealism: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume 6. Routledge.score: 516.0
    German Idealism was one of the most fertile and important movements in the history of Western philosophy. This volume includes eleven chapters on all aspects and the period's most influential philosophers, including Kant and Hegel.
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  2. Iain Hamilton Grant (2013). The Universe in the Universe: German Idealism and the Natural History of Mind. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:297-316.score: 486.0
    Recent considerations of mind and world react against philosophical naturalisation strategies by maintaining that the thought of the world is normatively driven to reject reductive or bald naturalism. This paper argues that we may reject bald or naturalism without sacrificing nature to normativity and so retreating from metaphysics to transcendental idealism. The resources for this move can be found in the Naturphilosophie outlined by the German Idealist philosopher F.W.J. Schelling. He argues that because thought occurs in the same universe (...)
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  3. Kathleen M. Higgins & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (2003). The Age of German Idealism: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume Vi. Routledge.score: 471.0
    The turn of the nineteenth century marked a rich and exciting explosion of philosophical energy and talent. The enormity of the revolution set off in philosophy by Immanuel Kant was comparable, by Kant's own estimation, with the Copernican Revolution that ended the Middle Ages. The movement he set in motion, the fast-moving and often cantankerous dialectic of `German Idealism', inspired some of the most creative philosophers in modern times: including G.W.F. Hegel and Arthur Schopenhauer as well as those who (...)
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  4. Peter Koslowski (ed.) (2005). The Discovery of Historicity in German Idealism and Historism. Springer.score: 441.0
    German Idealism develops its philosophy of history as the theory of becoming absolute and as absolute knowledge. Historism also originates from Hegel's and Schelling's discovery of absolute historicity as it turns against Idealism's philosophy of history by emphasizing the singular and unique in the process of history. German Idealism and Historism can be considered as the central German contribution to the history of ideas. Since Idealism became most influential for modern philosophy and Historism (...)
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  5. Paul W. Franks (2005). All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism. Harvard University Press.score: 390.0
    In this work, the first overview of the German Idealism that is both conceptual and methodological, Paul W. Franks offers a philosophical reconstruction that is...
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  6. Michael Mack (2003). German Idealism and the Jew: The Inner Anti-Semitism of Philosophy and German Jewish Responses. University of Chicago Press.score: 390.0
    In German Idealism and the Jew , Michael Mack uncovers the deep roots of anti-Semitism in the German philosophical tradition. While many have read German anti-Semitism as a reaction against Enlightenment philosophy, Mack instead contends that the redefinition of the Jews as irrational, oriental Others forms the very cornerstone of German idealism, including Kant's conception of universal reason. Offering the first analytical account of the connection between anti-Semitism and philosophy, Mack begins his exploration by showing how (...)
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  7. Robert C. Solomon & Kathleen Marie Higgins (eds.) (1993). The Age of German Idealism. Routledge.score: 378.0
    The turn of the nineteenth century marked a rich and exciting explosion of philosophical energy and talent. The enormity of the revolution set off in philosophy by Immanuel Kant was comparable, in Kant's own estimation, with the Copernican Revolution that ended the Middle Ages. The movement he set in motion, the fast-moving and often cantankerous dialectic of "German Idealism," inspired some of the most creative philosophers in modern times: including G. W. F. Hegel and Arthur Schopenhauer as well as (...)
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  8. Frederick C. Beiser (2002). German Idealism: The Struggle Against Subjectivism, 1781-1801 /Frederick C. Beiser. Harvard University Press.score: 360.0
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  9. Mark Kipperman (1986). Beyond Enchantment: German Idealism and English Romantic Poetry. University of Pennsylvania Press.score: 354.0
     
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  10. Jere Paul Surber (1996). Language and German Idealism: Fichte's Linguistic Philosophy. Humanities Press.score: 354.0
  11. Karl Ameriks (ed.) (2000). The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.score: 345.0
    The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism offers a comprehensive, penetrating, and informative guide to what is regarded as the classical period of German philosophy. Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Schelling are all discussed in detail, together with a number of their contemporaries, such as Hölderlin and Schleiermacher, whose influence was considerable but whose work is less well known in the English-speaking world. The essays in the volume trace and explore the unifying themes of German Idealism, and discuss their (...)
     
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  12. Kristin Gjesdal (2009). Gadamer and the Legacy of German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.score: 345.0
    Art, dialogue, and historical knowledge : appropriating Kant's Critique of judgment -- Beyond the third Critique : epistemological skepticism and aesthetic consciousness -- Overcoming the problems of modern philosophy : art, truth, and the turn to ontology -- History, reflection, and self-determination : critiquing the Enlightenment and Hegel -- Schleiermacher's critical theory of interpretation -- Normativity, critique, and reflection : the hermeneutic legacy of German Idealism.
     
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  13. Franz Gabriel Nauen (1972). Revolution, Idealism and Human Freedom: Schelling, Hölderlin and Hegel and the Crisis of Early German Idealism. The Hague,Nijhoff.score: 342.0
    CHAPTER I SETTING Hegel, perhaps the most self-questioning of all philosophers, was well aware that his thought was a response to intense social dislocation ...
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  14. Terry P. Pinkard (2002). German Philosophy, 1760-1860: The Legacy of Idealism. Cambridge University Press.score: 279.0
    In the second half of the eighteenth century, German philosophy came for a while to dominate European philosophy. It changed the way in which not only Europeans, but people all over the world, conceived of themselves and thought about nature, religion, human history, politics, and the structure of the human mind. In this rich and wide-ranging book, Terry Pinkard interweaves the story of 'Germany' - changing during this period from a loose collection of principalities into a newly-emerged nation (...)
     
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  15. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2004). Salomon Maimon and the Rise of Spinozism in German Idealism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (1):67-96.score: 270.0
    : In this paper I explore one issue in the history of German Idealism which has been widely neglected in the existing literature. I argue that Salomon Maimon was the first to suggest that Spinoza's pantheism was a radical religious (or 'acosmistic') view rather than atheism. Following a discussion of the historical context of Maimon's engagement with Spinoza, I point out the main Spinozistic element of Maimon 's philosophy: the view of God as the material cause of the (...)
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  16. Jacqueline Mariña (2007). All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism by Paul W. Franks. [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Neuere Theologiegeschichte/Journal for the History of Modern Theology 14 (1):145-149.score: 261.0
  17. Yitzhak Melamed (2014). Review of Ezequiel L Posesorski, Between Reinhold and Fichte: August Ludwig Hülsen's Contribution to the Emergence of German Idealism (Karlsruhe: KIT, 2012). Journal of the History of Philosophy 52:382-383.score: 261.0
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  18. Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.) (2010). Fichte, German Idealism, and Early Romanticism. Rodopi.score: 252.0
    This volume of 23 previously unpublished essays explores the relationship between the philosophy of J.G. Fichte and that of other leading thinkers associated ...
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  19. Robert B. Pippin (1989). Hegel's Idealism: The Satisfactions of Self-Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.score: 234.0
    This is the most important book on Hegel to have appeared in the past ten years. The author offers a completely new interpretation of Hegel's idealism that focuses on Hegel's appropriation and development of Kant's theoretical project. Hegel is presented neither as a pre-critical metaphysician nor as a social theorist, but as a critical philosopher whose disagreements with Kant, especially on the issue of intuitions, enrich the idealist arguments against empiricism, realism, and naturalism. In the face of the dismissal of (...)
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  20. Tom Rockmore (2004). Hegel, Idealism, and Analytic Philosophy. Yale University Press.score: 234.0
    In this book-the first large-scale survey of the complex relationship between Hegel's idealism and Anglo-American analytic philosophy-Tom Rockmore argues that analytic philosophy has consistently misread and misappropriated Hegel. According to Rockmore, the first generation of British analytic philosophers to engage Hegel possessed a limited understanding of his philosophy and of idealism. Succeeding generations continued to misinterpret him, and recent analytic thinkers have turned Hegel into a pragmatist by ignoring his idealism. Rockmore explains why this has happened, defends Hegel's idealism, and (...)
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  21. Sebastian Gardner (2005). Sartre, Intersubjectivity, and German Idealism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):325-351.score: 225.0
    Introduction: This paper has two, interrelated aims. The first is to clarify Sartre's theory of intersubjectivity. Sartre's discussion of the Other has a puzzling way of going in and out of focus, seeming at one moment to provide a remarkably original solution to the problem of other minds and at the next to wholly miss the point of the skeptical challenge. The nature of his argument is equally uncertain: at some points it looks like an attempt to mount a transcendental (...)
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  22. Martin McIvor (2008). The Young Marx and German Idealism: Revisiting the Doctoral Dissertation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):395-419.score: 225.0
    Recent discussions of “German Idealism” have laid new emphasis on its central concern with the self-determining or “unconditioned” status of self-consciousness, its critique of “reflective” or “foundationalist” epistemologies and metaphysics, and its account of “Reason” or conceptuality as immanent in all human experience and social life. This article contends that this revaluation throws new light upon Karl Marx’s 1841 doctoral dissertation on ancient Greek atomism. It argues that Marx’s interest in comparing the atomistic theories of Democritus and Epicurus (...)
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  23. Jon Stewart (2010/2012). Idealism and Existentialism: Hegel and Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Continuum.score: 225.0
    Hegel and the myth of reason -- Hegel's phenomenology as a systematic fragment -- The architectonic of Hegel's Phenomenology of spirit -- Points of contact in the philosophy of religion of Hegel and Schopenhauer -- Kierkegaard's criticism of the absence of ethics in Hegel's system -- Kierkegaard's criticism of abstraction and his proposed solution : appropriation -- Kierkegaard's recurring criticism of Hegel's The good and conscience-- Hegel and Nietzsche on the death of tragedy and Greek ethical life -- Existentialist ethics (...)
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  24. Henry Southgate (2013). Spinoza and German Idealism Ed. By Eckart Förster, Yitzhak Y. Melamed (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):495-496.score: 225.0
    It turns out that you can teach an old dog—even a “dead dog,” as Lessing would describe Spinoza—new tricks. In Spinoza and German Idealism, we learn not only how Spinoza influenced the German Idealists, but also how they transformed and gave new life to the key concepts of his system. In this collection of fourteen essays, we see how Kant, Schleiermacher, Herder, Goethe, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, and Trendelenburg understood (and misunderstood) Spinoza’s conception of God, intellectual intuition, human freedom, (...)
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  25. Peter Thielke (2013). Recent Work on Early German Idealism (1781–1801). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):149-192.score: 225.0
    One of the Key Questions Facing anyone interested in German Idealism concerns the puzzling transition from Kant to Hegel: how, in the course of a mere two decades, did Kant’s critical idealism, with its emphasis on the need to limit reason’s aspirations, come to be replaced by the seemingly boundless Absolute Idealism of the late 1790s and early 1800s? The traditional—though admittedly caricatured—answer follows an appealingly straightforward path from Kant to the idealist triumvirate of Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. The (...)
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  26. Sally S. Sedgwick (ed.) (2000). The Reception of Kant's Critical Philosophy: Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. Cambridge University Press.score: 216.0
    The period from Kant to Hegel is one of the most intense and rigorous in modern philosophy. The central problem at the heart of it was the development of a new standard of theoretical reflection and of the principle of rationality itself. The essays in this volume consider both the development of Kant's system of transcendental idealism in the three Critiques, the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, and the Opus Postumum, as well as the reception and transformation of that idealism (...)
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  27. Rüdiger Bubner (2003). The Innovations of Idealism. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    Originally published in German in 1995, this collection of essays has been written by the foremost representative of the hermeneutical approach in German philosophy. Offering a novel interpretation of the tradition of German Idealist thought--Kant, Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel--RU;diger Bubner insightfully reviews the philosophical innovations in the complex of issues and aspirations which dominated German intellectual life from 1780 to 1830. This collection will be of special interest to students of German philosophy, literary theory and (...)
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  28. Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling (1994). On the History of Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    On the History of Modern Philosophy is a key transitional text in the history of European philosophy. In it, F. W. J. Schelling surveys philosophy from Descartes to German Idealism and shows why the Idealist project is ultimately doomed to failure. The lectures trace the path of philosophy from Descartes through Spinoza, Leibniz, Kant, Fichte, Jacobi, to Hegel and Schelling's own work. The extensive critiques of Hegel prefigure many of the arguments to be found in Feuerbach, Kierkegaard, (...)
     
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  29. Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Y. Melamed (eds.) (2012). Spinoza and German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.score: 207.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Rationality, idealism, monism, and beyond Michael Della Rocca; 2. Kant's idea of the unconditioned and Spinoza's the fourth antinomy and the ideal of pure reason Omri Boehm; 3. The question is whether a purely apparent person is possible Karl Ameriks; 4. Herder and Spinoza Michael Forster; 5. Goethe's Spinozism Eckart Förster; 6. Fichte on freedom: the Spinozistic background Allen Wood; 7. Fichte on the consciousness of Spinoza's God Johannes Haag; 8. Spinoza in Schelling's early conception (...)
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  30. Paul Redding (2011). German Idealism. In George Klosko (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 348.score: 207.0
  31. William Desmond, Ernst-Otto Jan Onnasch & Paul Cruysberghs (eds.) (2004). Philosophy and Religion in German Idealism. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 200.0
    This volume comprises studies written by prominent scholars working in the field of German Idealism. These scholars come from the English speaking philosophical world and Continental Europe. They treat major aspects of the place of religion in Idealism, Romanticism and other schools of thought and culture. They also discuss the tensions and relations between religion and philosophy in terms of the specific form they take in German Idealism, and in terms of the effect they still have on contemporary (...)
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  32. Markus Gabriel (2009). Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism. Continuum.score: 200.0
    A hugely important book that rediscovers three crucial, but long overlooked themes in German idealism: mythology, madness and laughter.
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  33. Kyriaki Goudeli (2002). Challenges to German Idealism: Schelling, Fichte, and Kant. Palgrave.score: 200.0
    This book offers an important reappraisal of Schelling's philosophy and his relationship to German Idealism. Focusing on Schelling's self-critique in early identity philosophy the author rejects those criticisms of Schelling made by both Hegel and Heidegger. This work significantly redraws the boundaries of metaphysical thinking, arguing for a dialogue between rational philosophy, mythology and cosmology.
     
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  34. Klaus Brinkmann (ed.) (2007). German Idealism: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge.score: 200.0
    v. 1. The Enlightenment, Kant -- v. 2. Kant's immediate critics, Early German romanticism -- v. 3. General characterization, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel -- v. 4. New horizons, The legacy of German idealism.
     
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  35. Brian O'Connor & Georg Mohr (eds.) (2006). German Idealism: An Anthology and Guide. University of Chicago Press.score: 200.0
    Beginning with the publication of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and extending through to Hegel’s death, the period known as German Idealism signaled the end of an epoch of rationalism, empiricism, and enlightenment—and the beginning of a new “critical” period of philosophy. The most comprehensive anthology of this vital tradition to date, German Idealism brings together an expansive selection of readings from the tradition’s major figures like Kant, Hegel, Fichte, and Schelling. Arranged thematically into sections on topics such (...)
     
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  36. Francesco Tomasoni (2003). Modernity and the Final Aim of History: The Debate Over Judaism From Kant to the Young Hegelians. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 198.0
    This book is intended not only for scholars and students in humanities, history (esp. the history of ideas), Jewish studies, philosophy (esp. the history of philosophy), and Christian theology, but also for those concerned with the roots of anti-Semitism and with the need for toleration and intercultural pluralism. Modernity and the Final Aim of History: * Combines the development of German philosophy from the Enlightenment to Idealism, and from Idealism to the revolutionary turning-point of the (...)
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  37. Donald Loose (ed.) (2012). The Sublime and its Teleology: Kant, German Idealism, Phenomenology. Brill.score: 198.0
    Based on their critical analysis of Kant's "Critique of Judgment", the authors of this book show from different perspectives in what way the Kantian concept of the sublime is still a main stream of inspiration for contemporary thinking.
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  38. Alex Englander (2013). Herder's 'Expressivist' Metaphysics and the Origins of German Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):902 - 924.score: 198.0
    Charles Taylor's influential exposition of Hegel made the doctrine of expressivism of central importance and identified Herder as its exemplary historical advocate. The breadth and generality of Taylor's use of ?expressivism? have led the concept into some disrepute, but a more precise formulation of the doctrine as a theory of meaning can both demonstrate what is worthwhile and accurate in Taylor's account, and allow us a useful point of entry into Herder's multifaceted philosophy. A reconstruction of Herder's overall philosophical position, (...)
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  39. Theodore D. George (2011). Passive Resistance: Giorgio Agamben and the Bequest of German Idealism and Romanticism. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):37-48.score: 198.0
    The purpose of this essay is to examine Giorgio Agamben’s important but underappreciated debts to the early German Romantics and to Hegel. While maintaining critical distance from these figures, Agamben develops crucial aspects of his approach to radical passivity with reference to them. The focus of this essay is on Agamben’s consideration of the early German Romantics’ notions of criticism and irony, Hegel’s notion of language, and the implications of this view of language for his notion of community.
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  40. Andrew Fiala (2004). Linguistic Nationalism and Linguistic Diversity in German Idealism. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):159-183.score: 198.0
    Hegel did not have an adequate appreciation of linguistic diversity. This lapse is linked to Hegel’s Eurocentric view of history and culture. Hegel’s view of language is considered within the context of Leibniz’s hope for a universal philosophical language, the metacritique of Kant, and Fichte’s linguistic nationalism. Hegel overcomes the sort of nationalism found in Fichte. And Hegel aspires toward the universal while recognizing the importance of concrete historical language. However, he does not achieve the sort of appreciation of (...)
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  41. Douglas Moggach (1994). Marx and German Idealism: Labour and the Transcendental Synthesis. History of European Ideas 19 (1-3):137-143.score: 198.0
    This paper disputes Habermas' accounts of labor as monological expressivist-aesthetic or instrumental action. It shows how tensions in Kant's account of experience, as developed by Fichte and Hegel, enable Marx to formulate two distinct intersubjective models of labor, teleological and structural. Marx elaborates the former in the 1844 Manuscripts, and the latter in the German Ideology. He combines the two models the two models in Capital. Each model has normative implications for theories of intersubjectivity and democracy.
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  42. Dalia Nassar (2011). The Absolute in German Romanticism and Idealism. In Alison Stone (ed.), The Edinburgh Critical History of Philosophy, Volume 5: The Nineteenth Century. Edinburgh University Press.score: 198.0
    This article provides a detailed conceptual and historical analysis of the controversial and often misunderstood notion of the “absolute,” examines the philosophical reasons behind its development, and offers an in-depth account of Schelling and Hegel’s disagreement on its meaning and role. It uniquely examines romantic as well as idealist views of the notion of the absolute, and investigates both its metaphysical and epistemological foundations.
     
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  43. W. J. Mander (2011). British Idealism: A History. Oxford University Press.score: 196.0
    Through clear explanation of its characteristic concepts and doctrines, and paying close attention to the published works of its philosophers, the volume ...
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  44. Rolf Ahlers (ed.) (2004). System and Context: Early Romantic and Early Idealistic Constellations = System Und Kontext: Frühromantische Und Frühidealistische Konstellationen. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 195.0
  45. Sebastian Gardner (2012). Schopenhauer's Contraction of Reason: Clarifying Kant and Undoing German Idealism. Kantian Review 17 (3):375-401.score: 192.0
    Schopenhauer's claim that the essence of the world consists in Wille encounters well-known difficulties. Of particular importance is the conflict of this metaphysical claim with his restrictive account of conceptuality. This paper attempts to make sense of Schopenhauer's position by restoring him to the context of post-Kantian debate, with special attention to the early notebooks and Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason. On the reconstruction suggested here, Schopenhauer's philosophical project should be understood in light of his rejection of (...)
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  46. Steve Naragon (2014). Kant's Career in German Idealism. In Matthew Altman (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of German Idealism. Palgrave Macmillan. 15-33.score: 192.0
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  47. Daniel Breazeale (2008). Review: Henrich, Between Kant and Hegel. Lectures on German Idealism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 330-331.score: 189.0
  48. Espen Hammer (2003). The Legacy of German Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):521 – 535.score: 189.0
  49. Matthew C. Altman (2011). German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):953-956.score: 189.0
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  50. Dale E. Snow (1987). F. H. Jacobi and the Development of German Idealism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (3):397-415.score: 189.0
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