Search results for 'Idealism, German History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kathleen Higgins & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (2016). The Age of German Idealism: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume 6. Routledge.
    German Idealism was one of the most fertile and important movements in the history of Western philosophy. This volume includes eleven chapters on all aspects and the period's most influential philosophers, including Kant and Hegel.
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  2.  3
    Kathleen Higgins & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (2003). The Age of German Idealism: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume 6. Routledge.
    German Idealism was one of the most fertile and important movements in the history of Western philosophy. This volume includes eleven chapters on all aspects and the period's most influential philosophers, including Kant and Hegel.
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  3.  33
    Iain Hamilton Grant (2013). The Universe in the Universe: German Idealism and the Natural History of Mind. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:297-316.
    Recent considerations of mind and world react against philosophical naturalisation strategies by maintaining that the thought of the world is normatively driven to reject reductive or bald naturalism. This paper argues that we may reject bald or naturalism without sacrificing nature to normativity and so retreating from metaphysics to transcendental idealism. The resources for this move can be found in the Naturphilosophie outlined by the German Idealist philosopher F.W.J. Schelling. He argues that because thought occurs in the same universe (...)
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  4. Kathleen M. Higgins & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (2003). The Age of German Idealism: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume Vi. Routledge.
    The turn of the nineteenth century marked a rich and exciting explosion of philosophical energy and talent. The enormity of the revolution set off in philosophy by Immanuel Kant was comparable, by Kant's own estimation, with the Copernican Revolution that ended the Middle Ages. The movement he set in motion, the fast-moving and often cantankerous dialectic of `German Idealism', inspired some of the most creative philosophers in modern times: including G.W.F. Hegel and Arthur Schopenhauer as well as those who (...)
     
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  5. Kathleen M. Higgins & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (1993). The Age of German Idealism: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume Vi. Routledge.
    The turn of the nineteenth century marked a rich and exciting explosion of philosophical energy and talent. The enormity of the revolution set off in philosophy by Immanuel Kant was comparable, by Kant's own estimation, with the Copernican Revolution that ended the Middle Ages. The movement he set in motion, the fast-moving and often cantankerous dialectic of `German Idealism', inspired some of the most creative philosophers in modern times: including G.W.F. Hegel and Arthur Schopenhauer as well as those who (...)
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  6. Peter Gordon (2005). Review: Self-Authorizing Modernity: Problems of Interpretation in the History of German Idealism. [REVIEW] History and Theory 44 (1):121-137.
    German Idealism: The Struggle against Subjectivism, 1781-1801 by Frederick C. Beiser German Philosophy, 1760-1860: The Legacy of Idealism by Terry Pinkard.
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  7.  58
    Peter Koslowski (ed.) (2005). The Discovery of Historicity in German Idealism and Historism. Springer.
    German Idealism develops its philosophy of history as the theory of becoming absolute and as absolute knowledge. Historism also originates from Hegel's and Schelling's discovery of absolute historicity as it turns against Idealism's philosophy of history by emphasizing the singular and unique in the process of history. German Idealism and Historism can be considered as the central German contribution to the history of ideas. Since Idealism became most influential for modern philosophy and Historism (...)
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  8.  65
    Paul Franks (2005). All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism. Harvard University Press.
    In this work, the first overview of the German Idealism that is both conceptual and methodological, Paul W. Franks offers a philosophical reconstruction that is...
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  9.  41
    Michael Mack (2003). German Idealism and the Jew: The Inner Anti-Semitism of Philosophy and German Jewish Responses. University of Chicago Press.
    In German Idealism and the Jew , Michael Mack uncovers the deep roots of anti-Semitism in the German philosophical tradition. While many have read German anti-Semitism as a reaction against Enlightenment philosophy, Mack instead contends that the redefinition of the Jews as irrational, oriental Others forms the very cornerstone of German idealism, including Kant's conception of universal reason. Offering the first analytical account of the connection between anti-Semitism and philosophy, Mack begins his exploration by showing how (...)
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  10.  40
    Robert C. Solomon & Kathleen Marie Higgins (eds.) (1993). The Age of German Idealism. Routledge.
    The turn of the nineteenth century marked a rich and exciting explosion of philosophical energy and talent. The enormity of the revolution set off in philosophy by Immanuel Kant was comparable, in Kant's own estimation, with the Copernican Revolution that ended the Middle Ages. The movement he set in motion, the fast-moving and often cantankerous dialectic of "German Idealism," inspired some of the most creative philosophers in modern times: including G. W. F. Hegel and Arthur Schopenhauer as well as (...)
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  11. Frederick C. Beiser (2002). German Idealism: The Struggle Against Subjectivism, 1781-1801 /Frederick C. Beiser. Harvard University Press.
     
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  12. Mark Kipperman (1986). Beyond Enchantment: German Idealism and English Romantic Poetry. University of Pennsylvania Press.
     
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  13. Jere Paul Surber (1996). Language and German Idealism: Fichte's Linguistic Philosophy. Humanities Press.
  14. Karl Ameriks (ed.) (2000). The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism offers a comprehensive, penetrating, and informative guide to what is regarded as the classical period of German philosophy. Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Schelling are all discussed in detail, together with a number of their contemporaries, such as Hölderlin and Schleiermacher, whose influence was considerable but whose work is less well known in the English-speaking world. The essays in the volume trace and explore the unifying themes of German Idealism, and discuss their (...)
     
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  15. Kristin Gjesdal (2009). Gadamer and the Legacy of German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    Art, dialogue, and historical knowledge : appropriating Kant's Critique of judgment -- Beyond the third Critique : epistemological skepticism and aesthetic consciousness -- Overcoming the problems of modern philosophy : art, truth, and the turn to ontology -- History, reflection, and self-determination : critiquing the Enlightenment and Hegel -- Schleiermacher's critical theory of interpretation -- Normativity, critique, and reflection : the hermeneutic legacy of German Idealism.
     
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  16. Frank Schalow (ed.) (1998). Language and Deed: Rediscovering Politics Through Heidegger's Encounter with German Idealism. Rodopi.
    This book examines Heidegger's controversial relation to politics as it grows out of his understanding of his predecessors in German Idealism, most notably, Hegel. This way of developing a dialogue between Heidegger and Hegel on the issue of politics provides an important context for questioning the former's link with National Socialism. Yet the book does not simply condemn Heidegger for his Nazi involvement nor claim that his thinking is free from dangerous political implications. On the contrary, a second level (...)
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  17.  19
    Franz Gabriel Nauen (1972). Revolution, Idealism and Human Freedom: Schelling, Hölderlin and Hegel and the Crisis of Early German Idealism. The Hague,Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER I SETTING Hegel, perhaps the most self-questioning of all philosophers, was well aware that his thought was a response to intense social dislocation ...
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  18.  1
    Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Y. Melamed (eds.) (2012). Spinoza and German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    There can be little doubt that without Spinoza, German Idealism would have been just as impossible as it would have been without Kant. Yet the precise nature of Spinoza's influence on the German Idealists has hardly been studied in detail. This volume of essays by leading scholars sheds light on how the appropriation of Spinoza by Fichte, Schelling and Hegel grew out of the reception of his philosophy by, among others, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Jacobi, Herder, Goethe, Schleiermacher, Maimon and, (...)
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  19. Terry P. Pinkard (2002). German Philosophy, 1760-1860: The Legacy of Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    In the second half of the eighteenth century, German philosophy came for a while to dominate European philosophy. It changed the way in which not only Europeans, but people all over the world, conceived of themselves and thought about nature, religion, human history, politics, and the structure of the human mind. In this rich and wide-ranging book, Terry Pinkard interweaves the story of 'Germany' - changing during this period from a loose collection of principalities into a newly-emerged nation (...)
     
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  20. Daniel Breazeale (2007). All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (4):665-667.
    Daniel Breazeale - All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.4 665-667 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Daniel Breazeale University of Kentucky Paul W. Franks. All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005. Pp. viii + 440. Cloth, $49.95. Paul Franks' All or Nothing is in no (...)
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  21.  76
    Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2004). Salomon Maimon and the Rise of Spinozism in German Idealism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (1):67-96.
    : In this paper I explore one issue in the history of German Idealism which has been widely neglected in the existing literature. I argue that Salomon Maimon was the first to suggest that Spinoza's pantheism was a radical religious (or 'acosmistic') view rather than atheism. Following a discussion of the historical context of Maimon's engagement with Spinoza, I point out the main Spinozistic element of Maimon 's philosophy: the view of God as the material cause of the (...)
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  22.  3
    John Zammito (2004). Reconstructing German Idealism and Romanticism: Historicism and Presentism. Modern Intellectual History 1 (3):427-438.
    Frederick Beiser, German Idealism: The Struggle Against Subjectivism, 1781–1801 Robert Richards, The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe All art should become science and all science art; poetry and philosophy should be made one. Friedrich Schlegel, Kritische Fragmente When two major studies on the same thematic appear roughly simultaneously, integrating not only their authors' respective careers but the revisions of a whole generation of scholarship, the moment cries out for stock-taking, both substantively and (...)
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  23.  54
    Daniel Breazeale (2008). Review: Henrich, Between Kant and Hegel. Lectures on German Idealism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 330-331.
    As the author explains, the title of this work is intended to distinguish it from ordinary, Whiggish accounts of the development of German philosophy “from Kant to Hegel.” Instead, Heinrich treats the positions of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel as potentially viable alternatives, none of which must be viewed as aufgehoben by those that followed, and all of which deserve reconsideration by contemporary philosophers.Dieter Henrich is known for two things: first, for championing a minutely-detailed, revisionist approach to the history (...)
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  24.  8
    Daniel Breazeale (2008). Between Kant and Hegel. Lectures on German Idealism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):330-331.
    As the author explains, the title of this work is intended to distinguish it from ordinary, Whiggish accounts of the development of German philosophy “from Kant to Hegel.” Instead, Heinrich treats the positions of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel as potentially viable alternatives, none of which must be viewed as aufgehoben by those that followed, and all of which deserve reconsideration by contemporary philosophers.Dieter Henrich is known for two things: first, for championing a minutely-detailed, revisionist approach to the history (...)
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  25.  5
    Daniel Breazeale (2008). Between Kant and Hegel. Lectures on German Idealism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):330-331.
    As the author explains, the title of this work is intended to distinguish it from ordinary, Whiggish accounts of the development of German philosophy “from Kant to Hegel.” Instead, Heinrich treats the positions of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel as potentially viable alternatives, none of which must be viewed as aufgehoben by those that followed, and all of which deserve reconsideration by contemporary philosophers.Dieter Henrich is known for two things: first, for championing a minutely-detailed, revisionist approach to the history (...)
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  26.  68
    Jacqueline Mariña (2007). All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism by Paul W. Franks. [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Neuere Theologiegeschichte/Journal for the History of Modern Theology 14 (1):145-149.
  27.  32
    Yitzhak Melamed (2014). Review of Ezequiel L Posesorski, Between Reinhold and Fichte: August Ludwig Hülsen's Contribution to the Emergence of German Idealism (Karlsruhe: KIT, 2012). Journal of the History of Philosophy 52:382-383.
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  28.  3
    Andrew Bowie (1999). German Philosophy Today: Between Idealism, Romanticism, and Pragmatism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44 (3):357-398.
    In his essay On the History of Religion and Philosophy in Germany , of 1834, Heinrich Heine suggested to his French audience that the German propensity for ‘metaphysical abstractions’ had led many people to condemn philosophy for its failure to have a practical effect, Germany having only had its revolution in thought, while France had its in reality. Heine, albeit somewhat ironically, refuses to join those who condemn philosophy: ‘German philosophy is an important matter, which concerns the (...)
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  29. Nicholas Boyle & Liz Disley (eds.) (2013). The Impact of Idealism 4 Volume Set: The Legacy of Post-Kantian German Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    German Idealism is arguably the most influential force in philosophy over the past two hundred years. This major four-volume work is the first comprehensive survey of its impact on science, religion, sociology and the humanities, and brings together fifty-two leading scholars from across Europe and North America. Each essay discusses an idea or theme from Kant, Hegel, Schelling, Fichte, or another key figure, shows how this influenced a thinker or field of study in the subsequent two centuries, and how (...)
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  30. Joseph Carew (2011). The Grundlogik of German Idealism: The Ambiguity of the Hegel-Schelling Relationship in Žižek. International Journal of Žižek Studies 5 (1):1.
    Following a series of textual gestures which suggest that Schelling is the culmination of the German Idealist tradition, this essay is an attempt to articulate the ambiguity of the Hegel-Schelling relationship in Slavoj Žižek's work and its productive potential. Characterizing his own dialectical materialism again and again as Hegelian, but never a Schellingian project, Žižek often belies the central role played by late Schelling of the Freiheitsschrift and the Weltalter in the self-unfolding logic of the tradition. But why is (...)
     
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  31. David James (2015). Fichte's Republic: Idealism, History and Nationalism. Cambridge University Press.
    The Addresses to the German Nation is one of Fichte's best-known works. It is also his most controversial work because of its nationalist elements. In this book, David James places this text and its nationalism within the context provided by Fichte's philosophical, educational and moral project of creating a community governed by pure practical reason, in which his own foundational philosophical science or Wissenschaftslehre could achieve general recognition. Rather than marking a break in Fichte's philosophy, the Addresses to the (...)
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  32. David James (2013). Rousseau and German Idealism: Freedom, Dependence and Necessity. Cambridge University Press.
    The claim that Rousseau's writings influenced the development of Kant's critical philosophy, and German idealism, is not a new one. As correct as the claim may be, it does not amount to a systematic account of Rousseau's place within this philosophical tradition. It also suggests a progression whereby Rousseau's achievements are eventually eclipsed by those of Kant, Fichte and Hegel, especially with respect to the idea of freedom. In this book David James shows that Rousseau presents certain challenges that (...)
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  33. Brian O'Connor, Michael Rosen, Hans Jörg Sandkühler & David W. Wood (eds.) (2020). German Idealism. Routledge.
    The course of German Idealism, which lasted from Kant to Schelling, is one of the most important and influential periods in the history of philosophy. _The Routledge Handbook of German Idealism_ is a superb resource for all students and scholars of the movement. Its twelve specially commissioned thematic chapters, all written by experts in the area, cover the essential aspects of German idealism, including Knowledge, nature, freedom and morality, law, history, religion, art and the European (...)
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  34. Brian O'Connor, Michael Rosen, Hans Jörg Sandkühler & David W. Wood (eds.) (2015). The Routledge Handbook of German Idealism. Routledge.
    The course of German Idealism, which lasted from Kant to Schelling, is one of the most important and influential periods in the history of philosophy. The Routledge Handbook of German Idealism is a superb resource for all students and scholars of the movement. Its twelve specially commissioned thematic chapters, all written by experts in the area, cover the essential aspects of German idealism, including Knowledge, nature, freedom and morality, law, history, religion, art and the European (...)
     
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  35.  36
    Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.) (2010). Fichte, German Idealism, and Early Romanticism. Rodopi.
    This volume of 23 previously unpublished essays explores the relationship between the philosophy of J.G. Fichte and that of other leading thinkers associated ...
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  36. Jeremy Dunham, Iain Hamilton Grant & Sean Watson (2011). Idealism: The History of a Philosophy. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Contents Introduction: Why Idealism Matters Part 1: Ancient Idealism 1. Parmenides and the Birth of Ancient Idealism 2. Plato and Neoplatonism Part 2: Early Modern Idealism 3. Phenomenalism and Idealism I: Descartes and Malebranche 4. Phenomenalism and Idealism II: Leibniz and Berkeley Part 3: German Idealism 5. Immanuel Kant: Cognition, Freedom and Teleology 6. Fichte and the System of Freedom 7. Philosophy of Nature and the Birth of Absolute Idealism: Schelling 8. Hegel and Hegelianism: Mind, Nature and Logic Part (...)
     
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  37.  43
    Robert B. Pippin (1989). Hegel's Idealism: The Satisfactions of Self-Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the most important book on Hegel to have appeared in the past ten years. The author offers a completely new interpretation of Hegel's idealism that focuses on Hegel's appropriation and development of Kant's theoretical project. Hegel is presented neither as a pre-critical metaphysician nor as a social theorist, but as a critical philosopher whose disagreements with Kant, especially on the issue of intuitions, enrich the idealist arguments against empiricism, realism, and naturalism. In the face of the dismissal of (...)
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  38.  21
    Tom Rockmore (2004). Hegel, Idealism, and Analytic Philosophy. Yale University Press.
    In this book-the first large-scale survey of the complex relationship between Hegel's idealism and Anglo-American analytic philosophy-Tom Rockmore argues that analytic philosophy has consistently misread and misappropriated Hegel. According to Rockmore, the first generation of British analytic philosophers to engage Hegel possessed a limited understanding of his philosophy and of idealism. Succeeding generations continued to misinterpret him, and recent analytic thinkers have turned Hegel into a pragmatist by ignoring his idealism. Rockmore explains why this has happened, defends Hegel's idealism, and (...)
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  39.  64
    Sebastian Gardner (2005). Sartre, Intersubjectivity, and German Idealism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):325-351.
    Introduction: This paper has two, interrelated aims. The first is to clarify Sartre's theory of intersubjectivity. Sartre's discussion of the Other has a puzzling way of going in and out of focus, seeming at one moment to provide a remarkably original solution to the problem of other minds and at the next to wholly miss the point of the skeptical challenge. The nature of his argument is equally uncertain: at some points it looks like an attempt to mount a transcendental (...)
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  40.  26
    Peter Thielke (2013). Recent Work on Early German Idealism (1781–1801). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):149-192.
    One of the Key Questions Facing anyone interested in German Idealism concerns the puzzling transition from Kant to Hegel: how, in the course of a mere two decades, did Kant’s critical idealism, with its emphasis on the need to limit reason’s aspirations, come to be replaced by the seemingly boundless Absolute Idealism of the late 1790s and early 1800s? The traditional—though admittedly caricatured—answer follows an appealingly straightforward path from Kant to the idealist triumvirate of Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. The (...)
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  41.  16
    Henry Southgate (2013). Spinoza and German Idealism Ed. By Eckart Förster, Yitzhak Y. Melamed (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):495-496.
    It turns out that you can teach an old dog—even a “dead dog,” as Lessing would describe Spinoza—new tricks. In Spinoza and German Idealism, we learn not only how Spinoza influenced the German Idealists, but also how they transformed and gave new life to the key concepts of his system. In this collection of fourteen essays, we see how Kant, Schleiermacher, Herder, Goethe, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, and Trendelenburg understood (and misunderstood) Spinoza’s conception of God, intellectual intuition, human freedom, (...)
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  42.  32
    Martin McIvor (2008). The Young Marx and German Idealism: Revisiting the Doctoral Dissertation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):395-419.
    Recent discussions of “German Idealism ” have laid new emphasis on its central concern with the self-determining or “unconditioned” status of self-consciousness, its critique of “reflective” or “foundationalist” epistemologies and metaphysics, and its account of “Reason” or conceptuality as immanent in all human experience and social life. This article contends that this revaluation throws new light upon Karl Marx’s 1841 doctoral dissertation on ancient Greek atomism. It argues that Marx’s interest in comparing the atomistic theories of Democritus and Epicurus (...)
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  43.  13
    Christian Lotz (2011). Gadamer and the Legacy of German Idealism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (1):131-132.
    To be sure, Hans-Georg Gadamer's philosophy has received increased attention in recent philosophical debates. For although older confrontations, such as Gadamer's debate with Habermas, have receded in the background, scholars such as John McDowell, Cristina Lafont, Ruth Sonderegger, Albrecht Wellmer, and Günther Figal have revitalized some of Gadamer's main philosophical insights and demonstrated the importance of hermeneutics for contemporary philosophy. In addition, the newly-founded Society for Philosophical Hermeneutics has helped to give this recent attention a new academic forum for fresh (...)
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  44.  18
    Jon Stewart (2010). Idealism and Existentialism: Hegel and Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Continuum.
    Hegel and the myth of reason -- Hegel's phenomenology as a systematic fragment -- The architectonic of Hegel's Phenomenology of spirit -- Points of contact in the philosophy of religion of Hegel and Schopenhauer -- Kierkegaard's criticism of the absence of ethics in Hegel's system -- Kierkegaard's criticism of abstraction and his proposed solution : appropriation -- Kierkegaard's recurring criticism of Hegel's The good and conscience-- Hegel and Nietzsche on the death of tragedy and Greek ethical life -- Existentialist ethics (...)
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  45.  16
    Dalia Nassar (2015). Analogy, Natural History and the Philosophy of Nature: Kant, Herder and the Problem of Empirical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):240-257.
  46.  74
    Sally Sedgwick (ed.) (2000). The Reception of Kant's Critical Philosophy: Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. Cambridge University Press.
    The period from Kant to Hegel is one of the most intense and rigorous in modern philosophy. The central problem at the heart of it was the development of a new standard of theoretical reflection and of the principle of rationality itself. The essays in this volume consider both the development of Kant's system of transcendental idealism in the three Critiques, the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, and the Opus Postumum, as well as the reception and transformation of that idealism (...)
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  47.  38
    Rüdiger Bubner (2003). The Innovations of Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in German in 1995, this collection of essays has been written by the foremost representative of the hermeneutical approach in German philosophy. Offering a novel interpretation of the tradition of German Idealist thought--Kant, Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel--RU;diger Bubner insightfully reviews the philosophical innovations in the complex of issues and aspirations which dominated German intellectual life from 1780 to 1830. This collection will be of special interest to students of German philosophy, literary theory and (...)
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  48.  24
    Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Y. Melamed (eds.) (2012). Spinoza and German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Rationality, idealism, monism, and beyond Michael Della Rocca; 2. Kant's idea of the unconditioned and Spinoza's the fourth antinomy and the ideal of pure reason Omri Boehm; 3. The question is whether a purely apparent person is possible Karl Ameriks; 4. Herder and Spinoza Michael Forster; 5. Goethe's Spinozism Eckart Förster; 6. Fichte on freedom: the Spinozistic background Allen Wood; 7. Fichte on the consciousness of Spinoza's God Johannes Haag; 8. Spinoza in Schelling's early conception (...)
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  49. Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling (1994). On the History of Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    On the History of Modern Philosophy is a key transitional text in the history of European philosophy. In it, F. W. J. Schelling surveys philosophy from Descartes to German Idealism and shows why the Idealist project is ultimately doomed to failure. The lectures trace the path of philosophy from Descartes through Spinoza, Leibniz, Kant, Fichte, Jacobi, to Hegel and Schelling's own work. The extensive critiques of Hegel prefigure many of the arguments to be found in Feuerbach, Kierkegaard, (...)
     
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  50.  27
    Paul Redding (2011). German Idealism. In George Klosko (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press 348.
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