Search results for 'Identification' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (2003). Identification and Responsibility. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (4):349-376.score: 24.0
    Real-self accounts of moral responsibility distinguish between various types of motivational elements. They claim that an agent is responsible for acts suitably related to elements that constitute the agent's real self. While such accounts have certain advantages from a compatibilist perspective, they are problematic in various ways. First, in it, authority and authenticity conceptions of the real self are often inadequately distinguished. Both of these conceptions inform discourse on identification, but only the former is relevant to moral responsibility. Second, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jaakko Hintikka & John Symons (2003). Systems of Visual Identification in Neuroscience: Lessons From Epistemic Logic. Philosophy of Science 70 (1):89-104.score: 24.0
    The following analysis shows how developments in epistemic logic can play a nontrivial role in cognitive neuroscience. We argue that the striking correspondence between two modes of identification, as distinguished in the epistemic context, and two cognitive systems distinguished by neuroscientific investigation of the visual system (the "where" and "what" systems) is not coincidental, and that it can play a clarificatory role at the most fundamental levels of neuroscientific theory.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Anton Alterman (2003). ``A Piece of Yourself'': Ethical Issues in Biometric Identification. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 5 (3):139-150.score: 24.0
    The proliferation of biometric identification technology raises difficult issues in the matter of security, privacy and identity. Though biometric "images" are not images per se, they are both unique representations of an individual in themsevles and a means of access to other identifying information. I compare biometric imaging with other kinds of identifying representations and find that there are issues specific to biometric ID's. Because they represent information that is written into the body they are directly related to one's (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Dara J. Glasser, Kenneth W. Goodman & Norman G. Einspruch (2007). Chips, Tags and Scanners: Ethical Challenges for Radio Frequency Identification. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):101-109.score: 24.0
    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems identify and track objects, animals and, in principle, people. The ability to gather information obtained by tracking consumer goods, government documents, monetary transactions and human beings raises a number of interesting and important privacy issues. Moreover, RFID systems pose an ensemble of other ethical challenges related to appropriate uses and users of such systems. This paper reviews a number of RFID applications with the intention of identifying the technology’s benefits and possible misuses. We offer (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Andrew Crane & Trish Ruebottom (2011). Stakeholder Theory and Social Identity: Rethinking Stakeholder Identification. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):77-87.score: 24.0
    In this article, we propose an adaption to stakeholder theory whereby stakeholders are conceptualized on the basis of their social identity. We begin by offering a critical review of both traditional and more recent developments in stakeholder theory, focusing in particular on the way in which stakeholder categories are identified. By identifying critical weaknesses in the existing approach, as well as important points of strength, we outline an alternative approach that refines our understanding of stakeholders in important ways. To do (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2012). Identification in Games: Changing Places. Erkenntnis 77 (2):197-206.score: 24.0
    This paper offers a novel ‘changing places’ account of identification in games, where the consequences of role swapping are crucial. First, it illustrates how such an account is consistent with the view, in classical game theory, that only outcomes (and not pathways) are significant. Second, it argues that this account is superior to the ‘pooled resources’ alternative when it comes to dealing with some situations in which many players identify. Third, it shows how such a ‘changing places’ account can (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Hae-Ryong Kim, Moonkyu Lee, Hyoung-Tark Lee & Na-Min Kim (2010). Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee—Company Identification. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):557 - 569.score: 24.0
    This study proposes two identification cuing factors (i. e., CSR associations and CSR participation) to understand how corporate social responsibility (CSR) relates to employees' identification with their firm.The results reveal that a firm's CSR initiatives increase employee-company identification (E-C identification).E-C identification, in turn, influences employees' commitment to their company. However, CSR associations do not directly influence employees' identification with a firm, but rather influence their identification through perceived external prestige (PEP). Compared to CSR (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David Lyon (2008). Biometrics, Identification and Surveillance. Bioethics 22 (9):499-508.score: 24.0
    Governing by identity describes the emerging regime of a globalizing, mobile world. Governance depends on identification but identification increasingly depends on biometrics. This 'solution' to difficulties of verification is described and some technical weaknesses are discussed. The role of biometrics in classification systems is also considered and is shown to contain possible prejudice in relation to racialized criteria of identity. Lastly, the culture of biometric identification is shown to be limited to abstract data, artificially separated from the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Rafael Currás-Pérez, Enrique Bigné-Alcañiz & Alejandro Alvarado-Herrera (2009). The Role of Self-Definitional Principles in Consumer Identification with a Socially Responsible Company. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):547 - 564.score: 24.0
    This research analyses the influence of the perception of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR image) on consumer–company identification (C–C identification). This analysis involves an examination of the influence of CSR image on brand identity characteristics which provide consumers with an instrument to satisfy their self-definitional needs, thereby perceiving the brand as more attractive. Also, the direct and mediated influences (through their effect on brand attitude), of CSR-based C–C identification on purchase intention are analysed. The results offer empirical evidence (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1994). The Hidden Politics of Cultural Identification. Political Theory 22 (1):152-166.score: 24.0
    While cultural identification --cultural essentialism and reification-- can play an important liberating role. it is also internally oppressive; it denies the dynamics of intra cultural divisions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Alan R. Peslak (2005). An Ethical Exploration of Privacy and Radio Frequency Identification. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):327 - 345.score: 24.0
    This manuscript reviews the background of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) as well as the ethical foundations of individual privacy. This includes a historical perspective on personal privacy, a review of the United States Constitutional privacy interpretations, the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, European Union Regulations, as well as the positions of industry and advocacy groups. A brief review of the information technology ethics literature is also included. The RFID privacy concerns are three-fold: pre-sales activities, sales transaction activities, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Edward Higgs (2009). Change and Continuity in the Techniques and Technologies of Identification Over the Second Christian Millennium. Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):345-354.score: 24.0
    This paper looks at the history of identification in England over the past 1,000 years. It contends that techniques and technologies of identification do not identify a single entity but a number of forms of personality, including the juridical person, the citizen and the deviant. Individuals can be the bearers of more than one of these personalities at the same time, or over the course of their life. These personalities are created by social performances to which people are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Vladimir Labay & Amber McKee Anderson (2006). Ethical Considerations and Proposed Guidelines for the Use of Radio Frequency Identification: Especially Concerning its Use for Promoting Public Safety and National Security. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):265-272.score: 24.0
    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is quickly growing in its applications. A variety of uses for the technology are beginning to be developed, including chips which can be used in identification cards, in individual items, and for human applications, allowing a chip to be embedded under the skin. Such chips could provide numerous benefits ranging from day-to-day convenience to the increased ability of the federal government to adequately ensure the safety of its citizens. However, there are also valid concerns (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Daniel Holender (1986). Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification in Dichotic Listening, Parafoveal Vision, and Visual Masking: A Survey and Appraisal. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):1-23.score: 24.0
    When the stored representation of the meaning of a stimulus is accessed through the processing of a sensory input it is maintained in an activated state for a certain amount of time that allows for further processing. This semantic activation is generally accompanied by conscious identification, which can be demonstrated by the ability of a person to perform discriminations on the basis of the meaning of the stimulus. The idea that a sensory input can give rise to semantic activation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Matthias M. Graf, Sebastian C. Schuh, Niels Quaquebeke & Rolf Dick (2012). The Relationship Between Leaders' Group-Oriented Values and Follower Identification with and Endorsement of Leaders: The Moderating Role of Leaders' Group Membership. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):301-311.score: 24.0
    In this article, we hypothesize that leaders who display group-oriented values (i.e., values that focus on the welfare of the group rather than on the self-interest of the leader) will be evaluated more positively by their followers than leaders who do not display group-oriented values. Importantly, we expected these effects to be more pronounced for leaders who are ingroup members (i.e., stemming from the same social group as their followers) than for leaders who are outgroup members (i.e., leaders stemming from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Barjinder Singh & Doan E. Winkel (2012). Racial Differences in Helping Behaviors: The Role of Respect, Safety, and Identification. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):467-477.score: 24.0
    Building upon social and racial identity theories, this study examines the role of positive relational climate in predicting interpersonal helping behaviors (IHBs) at the workplace. Within this context, we examine both the role of mutual respect and psychological safety as exemplars of positive relational climate, and the mediating role of organizational identification (OI). The study also recognizes the importance of individual differences by examining racial differences in OI and IHBs. Results support the hypotheses and strengthen claims of social and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nicolas J. Bullot (forthcoming). Agent Tracking: A Psycho-Historical Theory of the Identification of Living and Social Agents. Biology and Philosophy:1-24.score: 24.0
    To explain agent-identification behaviours, universalist theories in the biological and cognitive sciences have posited mental mechanisms thought to be universal to all humans, such as agent detection and face recognition mechanisms. These universalist theories have paid little attention to how particular sociocultural or historical contexts interact with the psychobiological processes of agent-identification. In contrast to universalist theories, contextualist theories appeal to particular historical and sociocultural contexts for explaining agent-identification. Contextualist theories tend to adopt idiographic methods aimed at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David Murakami Wood & Rodrigo Firmino (2009). Empowerment or Repression? Opening Up Questions of Identification and Surveillance in Brazil Through a Case of 'Identity Fraud'. Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):297-317.score: 24.0
    A real but typical case of identity fraud is used to open up the complex web of identification systems in Brazil. It is argued that identification has two poles related to the nature of citizenship—repression and inclusion—and that reactions from citizens to new identification schemes can be attributed to how they view the purpose of the cards in these terms. In Brazil, a sense of inclusion and citizenship based on a fear of anonymity and exclusion predominates leading (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Stijn Decoster, Jeroen Camps, Jeroen Stouten, Lore Vandevyvere & Thomas M. Tripp (2013). Standing by Your Organization: The Impact of Organizational Identification and Abusive Supervision on Followers' Perceived Cohesion and Tendency to Gossip. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):623-634.score: 24.0
    Abusive supervision has been shown to have significant negative consequences for employees’ well-being, attitudes, and behavior. However, despite the devastating impact, it might well be that employees do not always react negatively toward a leader’s abusive behavior. In the present study, we show that employees’ organizational identification and abusive supervision interact for employees’ perceived cohesion with their work group and their tendency to gossip about their leader. Employees confronted with a highly abusive supervisor had a stronger perceived cohesion and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jan Decock, Jan Van Looy, Lizzy Bleumers & Philippe Bekaert (forthcoming). The Pleasure of Being (There?): An Explorative Study Into the Effects of Presence and Identification on the Enjoyment of an Interactive Theatrical Performance Using Omnidirectional Video. [REVIEW] AI and Society:1-11.score: 24.0
    This study explores how participants in an immersive theatrical performance perceive their role in the virtual environment (VE) and the effects of this perception on how they experience the performance as a whole. Using a quasi-experimental 2 × 2 design, narrative and task-based search was manipulated to explore the effects on spatial presence, social presence, identification and enjoyment. Results show that the effect of spatial presence on enjoyment of the performance is entirely mediated by identification with the role (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Hongwei He & Yan Li (2011). CSR and Service Brand: The Mediating Effect of Brand Identification and Moderating Effect of Service Quality. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (4):673 - 688.score: 24.0
    This article examines the mediation effect of brand identification and the moderating effect of service quality (SQ) on the effects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) association on service brand performance. A survey of customers of mobile telecommunications services was conducted. The study finds, first, that both CSR and SQ have direct effects on brand identification and customer satisfaction and indirect effects on customer satisfaction (via brand identification) and on service brand loyalty (via customer satisfaction and via "brand (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Kenneth Roeck & Nathalie Delobbe (2012). Do Environmental CSR Initiatives Serve Organizations' Legitimacy in the Oil Industry? Exploring Employees' Reactions Through Organizational Identification Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):397-412.score: 24.0
    Little is known about employees' responses to their organizations' initiatives in corporate social responsibility (CSR). Academics have already identified a few outcomes regarding CSR's impact on employees' attitudes and behaviours; however, studies explaining the underlying mechanisms that drive employees' favourable responses to CSR remain largely unexplored. Based on organizational identification (OI) theory, this study surveyed 155 employees of a petrochemical organization to better elucidate why, how and under which circumstances employees might positively respond to organizations' CSR initiatives in the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Carmel, Jake Fairnie & Nilli Lavie (2012). Weight and See: Loading Working Memory Improves Incidental Identification of Irrelevant Faces. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Are task-irrelevant stimuli processed to a level enabling individual identification? This question is central both for perceptual processing models and for applied settings (e.g., eyewitness testimony). Lavie’s load theory proposes that working memory actively maintains attentional prioritization of relevant over irrelevant information. Loading working memory thus impairs attentional prioritization, leading to increased processing of task-irrelevant stimuli. Previous research has shown that increased working memory load leads to greater interference effects from response competing distractors. Here we test the novel prediction (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Nilli Lavie David Carmel, Jake Fairnie (2012). Weight and See: Loading Working Memory Improves Incidental Identification of Irrelevant Faces. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Are task-irrelevant stimuli processed to a level enabling individual identification? This question is central both for perceptual processing models and for applied settings (e.g., eyewitness testimony). Lavie’s load theory proposes that working memory actively maintains attentional prioritization of relevant over irrelevant information. Loading working memory thus impairs attentional prioritization, leading to increased processing of task-irrelevant stimuli. Previous research has shown that increased working memory load leads to greater interference effects from response competing distractors. Here we test the novel prediction (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Kan Zhang Jianhui Wu, Hongxia Duan, Xing Tian, Peipei Wang (2012). The Effects of Visual Imagery on Face Identification: An ERP Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    The present study tested the hypothesis that the effects of mental imagery on subsequent perception occur at a later matching stage in perceptual identification, but not in the early perceptual stage as in perceptual detection. The behavioral results suggested that the effect of visual imagery on visual identification is content-specific, i.e., imagining a congruent face facilitates face identification, whereas a mismatch between imagery and perception leads to an interference effect. More importantly, the ERP results revealed that a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Makoto Kanazawa (1996). Identification in the Limit of Categorial Grammars. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 5 (2):115-155.score: 24.0
    It is proved that for any k, the class of classical categorial grammars that assign at most k types to each symbol in the alphabet is learnable, in the Gold (1967) sense of identification in the limit from positive data. The proof crucially relies on the fact that the concept known as finite elasticity in the inductive inference literature is preserved under the inverse image of a finite-valued relation. The learning algorithm presented here incorporates Buszkowski and Penn's (1990) algorithm (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. J. C. Mwangi, L. J. Vuuren & G. J. Rossouw (2005). Stakeholder Engagement by South African Businesses: Identification and Prioritization of Stakeholders. African Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):39.score: 24.0
    The term "stakeholder engagement" has gained increasing prominence over the last few years. This prominence is fueled by a range of issues such as an increased dissatisfaction with business's focus on stockholder/shareholder interests and the demands for greater transparency from business following major business scandals. A perceived response to this issue in South Africa has been the inclusion of guidelines on stakeholder engagement in the King II Report on Corporate Governance. Despite this growing interest, there has not been clarity on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Davide Crepaldi Simona Amenta (2012). Morphological Processing as We Know It: An Analytical Review of Morphological Effects in Visual Word Identification. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    The last 40 years have witnessed a growing interest in the mechanisms underlying the visual identification of complex words. A large amount of experimental data has been amassed, but although a growing number of studies are proposing explicit theoretical models for their data, no comprehensive theory has gained substantial agreement among scholars in the field. We believe that this is due, at least in part, to the presence of several controversial pieces of evidence in the literature and, consequently, to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Cristina Becchio Tiziano Furlanetto, Cesare Bertone (2013). The Bilocated Mind: New Perspectives on Self-Localization and Self-Identification. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Does the human mind allow for self-locating at more than one place at a time? Evidence from neurology, cognitive neuroscience, and experimental psychology suggests that mental bilocation is a complex, but genuine experience, occurring more frequently than commonly thought. In this article, we distinguish between different components of bilocated self-representation: self-localization in two different places at the same time, self-identification with another body, reduplication of first-person perspective. We argue that different forms of mental bilocation may result from the combination (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Matthias M. Graf, Niels van Quaquebeke & Rolf van Dick (2011). Two Independent Value Orientations: Ideal and Counter-Ideal Leader Values and Their Impact on Followers' Respect for and Identification with Their Leaders. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):185-195.score: 24.0
    Traditionally, conceptualizations of human values are based on the assumption that individuals possess a single integrated value system comprising those values that people are attracted by and strive for. Recently, however, van Quaquebeke et al. (in J Bus Ethics 93:293–305, 2010 ) proposed that a value system might consist of two largely independent value orientations—an orientation of ideal values and an orientation of counter-ideal values (values that individuals are repelled by), and that both orientations exhibit antithetic effects on people’s responses (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Matthias M. Graf, Sebastian C. Schuh, Niels Van Quaquebeke & Rolf van Dick (2012). The Relationship Between Leaders' Group-Oriented Values and Follower Identification with and Endorsement of Leaders: The Moderating Role of Leaders' Group Membership. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):301-311.score: 24.0
    In this article, we hypothesize that leaders who display group-oriented values (i.e., values that focus on the welfare of the group rather than on the self-interest of the leader) will be evaluated more positively by their followers than leaders who do not display group-oriented values. Importantly, we expected these effects to be more pronounced for leaders who are ingroup members (i.e., stemming from the same social group as their followers) than for leaders who are outgroup members (i.e., leaders stemming from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Matthew V. Pachai, Allison B. Sekuler & Patrick J. Bennett (2013). Sensitivity to Information Conveyed by Horizontal Contours is Correlated with Face Identification Accuracy. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    We measured thresholds in a 1-of-10 face identification task in which stimuli were embedded in orientation-filtered Gaussian noise. For upright faces, the threshold elevation produced by the masking noise varied as a function of noise orientation: significantly greater masking was obtained with horizontal noise than with vertical noise. However, the orientation selectivity of masking was significantly less with inverted faces. The performance of an ideal observer was qualitatively similar to human observers viewing upright faces – the masking function exhibited (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jerker Rönnberg Shahram Moradi, Björn Lidestam (2013). Gated Audiovisual Speech Identification in Silence Vs. Noise: Effects on Time and Accuracy. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    This study investigated the degree to which audiovisual presentation (compared to auditory-only presentation) affected isolation point (IPs, the amount of time required for the correct identification of speech stimuli using a gating paradigm) in silence and noise conditions. The study expanded on the findings of Moradi et al. (under revision), using the same stimuli, but presented in an audiovisual instead of an auditory-only manner. The results showed that noise impeded the identification of consonants and words (i.e., delayed IPs (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Darius Štitilis, Paulius Pakutinskas, Inga Dauparaitė & Marius Laurinaitis (2011). Preconditions for Legal Regulation of Personal Identification in Cyberspace. Jurisprudence 18 (2):703-724.score: 24.0
    The article analyses legal preconditions for personal identification in physical and electronic space (hereinafter – cyberspace). Analysis of legal governing of identification in physical space is followed by the analysis of the same in cyberspace. Compulsory elements of identification in physical space and compulsory and non-compulsory elements of identification in cyberspace are provided which leads to conclusions about problem aspects concerning personal identification in cyberspace and related legal governing. This scientific article consists of four main (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Niels van Quaquebeke, Rudolf Kerschreiter, Alice E. Buxton & Rolf van Dick (2010). Two Lighthouses to Navigate: Effects of Ideal and Counter-Ideal Values on Follower Identification and Satisfaction with Their Leaders. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (2):293-305.score: 24.0
    Ideals (or ideal values) help people to navigate in social life. They indicate at a very fundamental level what people are concerned about, what they strive for, and what they want to be affiliated with. Transferring this to a leader–follower analysis, our first study (n = 306) confirms that followers’ identification and satisfaction with their leaders are stronger, the more leaders match followers’ ideal leader values. Study 2 (n = 244) extends the perspective by introducing the novel concept of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jianhui Wu, Hongxia Duan, Xing Tian, Peipei Wang & Kan Zhang (2012). The Effects of Visual Imagery on Face Identification: An ERP Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    The present study tested the hypothesis that the effects of mental imagery on subsequent perception occur at a later matching stage in perceptual identification, but not in the early perceptual stage as in perceptual detection. The behavioral results suggested that the effect of visual imagery on visual identification is content-specific, i.e., imagining a congruent face facilitates face identification, whereas a mismatch between imagery and perception leads to an interference effect. More importantly, the ERP results revealed that a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Nicolas J. Bullot (2014). Explaining Person Identification: An Inquiry Into the Tracking of Human Agents. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3).score: 24.0
    To introduce the issue of the tracking and identification of human agents, I examine the ability of an agent (“a tracker”) to track a human person (“a target”) and distinguish this target from other individuals: The ability to perform person identification. First, I discuss influential mechanistic models of the perceptual recognition of human faces and people (the face-recognition program). Such models propose detailed hypotheses about the parts and activities of the mental mechanisms that control the perceptual recognition of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Kenneth De Roeck & Nathalie Delobbe (2012). Do Environmental CSR Initiatives Serve Organizations' Legitimacy in the Oil Industry? Exploring Employees' Reactions Through Organizational Identification Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):397-412.score: 24.0
    Little is known about employees’ responses to their organizations’ initiatives in corporate social responsibility (CSR). Academics have already identified a few outcomes regarding CSR’s impact on employees’ attitudes and behaviours; however, studies explaining the underlying mechanisms that drive employees’ favourable responses to CSR remain largely unexplored. Based on organizational identification (OI) theory, this study surveyed 155 employees of a petrochemical organization to better elucidate why, how and under which circumstances employees might positively respond to organizations’ CSR initiatives in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Marc Jeannerod & Elisabeth Pacherie (2004). Agency, Simulation and Self-Identification. Mind and Language 19 (2):113-146.score: 21.0
    This paper is concerned with the problem of selfidentification in the domain of action. We claim that this problem can arise not just for the self as object, but also for the self as subject in the ascription of agency. We discuss and evaluate some proposals concerning the mechanisms involved in selfidentification and in agencyascription, and their possible impairments in pathological cases. We argue in favor of a simulation hypothesis that claims that actions, whether overt or covert, are centrally simulated (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Kevin J. Harrelson (2012). Theology, History, and Religious Identification. Sophia.score: 21.0
    This essay deals with the impact of Hegel's philosophy of religion by examining his positions on religious identity and on the relationship between theology and history. I argue that his criterion for religious identity was socio-historical, and that his philosophical theology was historical rather than normative. These positions help explain some historical peculiarities regarding the effect of his philosophy of religion. Of particular concern is that although Hegel’s own aims were apologetic, his major influence on religious thought was in the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Saul Traiger (2000). Making the Right Identification in the Turing Test. Minds and Machines 10 (4):561-572.score: 21.0
    The <span class='Hi'>test</span> Turing proposed for machine intelligence is usually understood to be a <span class='Hi'>test</span> of whether a computer can fool a human into thinking that the computer is a human. This standard interpretation is rejected in favor of a <span class='Hi'>test</span> based on the Imitation Game introduced by Turing at the beginning of "Computing Machinery and Intelligence.".
    Direct download (17 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. J. Michael Hinton (1967). Perception and Identification. Philosophical Review 76 (October):421-435.score: 21.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John Kaler (2002). Morality and Strategy in Stakeholder Identification. Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):91 - 99.score: 21.0
    Definitions of what it is to be a stakeholder are divided into "claimant" definitions requiring some sort of claim on the services of a business, "influencer" definitions requiring only a capacity to influence the workings of the business, and "combinatory" definitions allowing for either or both of these requirements. It is argued that for the purposes of business ethics, stakeholding has to be about improving the moral conduct of businesses by directing them at serving more than just the interests of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Alain Auger & Caroline Barrière (eds.) (2010). Probing Semantic Relations: Exploration and Identification in Specialized Texts. John Benjamins Pub. Co..score: 21.0
    Probing semantic relations Exploration and identification in specialized texts Alain Auger and Caroline Barrière In recent years, several scientific ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. J. W. Meiland (1964). Meaning, Identification and Other Minds. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42 (December):360-374.score: 21.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David Effelsberg & Marc Solga (forthcoming). Transformational Leaders' In-Group Versus Out-Group Orientation: Testing the Link Between Leaders' Organizational Identification, Their Willingness to Engage in Unethical Pro-Organizational Behavior, and Follower-Perceived Transformational Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 21.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Martin L. Richter (1969). Reevaluation of "No-Memory" Results in Concept Identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (3):591.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Leona S. Aiken, John L. Santa & Alan B. Ruskin (1972). Nonreinforced Trials in Concept Identification: Presolution Statistics and Local Consistency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (1):100.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Veronika Coltheart (1971). Memory for Stimuli and Memory for Hypotheses in Concept Identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (1):102.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Stanford H. Simon & Basil Jackson (1968). Effect of a Relevant Versus Irrelevant Observation Stimulus on Concept-Identification Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (1p1):125.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000