Search results for 'Identity Theory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David Robb (2013). The Identity Theory as a Solution to the Exclusion Problem. In S. C. Gibb, E. J. Lowe & R. D. Ingthorsson (eds.), Mental Causation and Ontology. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    This is about a proposed solution to the exclusion problem, one I've defended elsewhere (for example, in "The Properties of Mental Causation"). Details aside, it's just the identity theory: mental properties face no threat of exclusion from, or preemption by, physical properties, because every mental property is a physical property. Here I elaborate on this solution and defend it from some objections. One of my goals is to place it in the context of a more general ontology of (...)
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  2. David Barrett (2013). Multiple Realizability, Identity Theory, and the Gradual Reorganization Principle. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (2):325-346.score: 240.0
    In the literature on multiple realizability and the identity theory, cases of neural plasticity have enjoyed a very limited role. The present article attempts to remedy this small influence by arguing that clinical and experimental evidence of quite extensive neural reorganization offers compelling support for the claim that psychological kinds are multiply realized in neurological kinds, thus undermining the identity theory. In particular, cases are presented where subjects with no measurable psychological deficits also have vast, though (...)
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  3. Sean Crawford (2013). The Myth of Logical Behaviourism and the Origins of the Identity Theory. In Michael Beaney (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    The identity theory’s rise to prominence in analytic philosophy of mind during the late 1950s and early 1960s is widely seen as a watershed in the development of physicalism, in the sense that whereas logical behaviourism proposed analytic and a priori ascertainable identities between the meanings of mental and physical-behavioural concepts, the identity theory proposed synthetic and a posteriori knowable identities between mental and physical properties. While this watershed does exist, the standard account of it is (...)
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  4. Colin Johnston (2013). Judgment and the Identity Theory of Truth. Philosophical Studies 166 (2):381-397.score: 240.0
    The identity theory of truth takes on different forms depending on whether it is combined with a dual relation or a multiple relation theory of judgment. This paper argues that there are two significant problems for the dual relation identity theorist regarding thought’s answerability to reality, neither of which takes a grip on the multiple relation identity theory.
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  5. Bernard D. Katz (1977). Davidson on the Identity Theory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (March):81-90.score: 240.0
    I discuss donald davidson's argument for the psycho-Physical identity theory and contend that it fails: it relies on an implausible account of mental and physical events. Davidson proposes a linguistic test for determining whether a given event is mental or physical. I argue that the assumptions that are necessary for employing such a criterion of the mental are either false or presuppose the truth of the identity theory.
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  6. Robert C. Richardson (1981). Disappearance and the Identity Theory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 11 (September):473-85.score: 240.0
    We have no schema for comprehending how a radical revision of our conceptual scheme such as that embraced by "eliminative materialism" could possibly be rationally justified. This general point is illustrated and pressed through an examination of richard rorty's classic defense of the "disappearance form of the identity theory." it is argued that 1) though more standard critiques of rorty fail, 2) rorty fails to make out the case for the view that incorrigibility" is the "mark of the (...)
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  7. Chandana Chakrabarti (1975). James and the Identity Theory. Behaviorism 3 (2):152-155.score: 240.0
    The paper makes a comparative study of james' interpretation of mental acts in terms of the felt movements of the body and the identity theory presented and defended by j j c smart and u t place. some features of remarkable similarity as well as important differences between james' view and the identity theory are discussed. a special reference is made to james' view on the question of the alleged spatial location of mental events.
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  8. Clive Vernon Borst (1970). The Mind-Brain Identity Theory: A Collection of Papers. New York,St Martin's P..score: 240.0
    Mind body, not a pseudo-problem, by H. Feigl.--Is consciousness a brain process? by U. T. Place.--Sensations and brain processes, by J. J. C. Smart.--The nature of mind, by D. M. Armstrong.--Materialism as a scientific hypothesis, by U. T. Place.--Sensations and brain processes: a reply to J. J. C. Smart, by J. T. Stevenson.--Further remarks on sensations and brain processes, by J. J. C. Smart.--Smart on sensations, by K. Baier.--Brain processes and incorrigibility, by J. J. C. Smart.--Could mental states be brain (...)
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  9. John A. Pearce (2013). Using Social Identity Theory to Predict Managers' Emphases on Ethical and Legal Values in Judging Business Issues. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):497-514.score: 240.0
    The need to fill three gaps in ethics research in a business context sparked the current study. First, the distinction between the concepts of “ethical” and “legal” needs to be incorporated into theory building and empiricism. Second, a unifying theory is needed that can explain the variables that influence managers to emphasize ethics and legality in their judgments. Third, empirical evidence is needed to confirm the predictive power of the unifying theory, the discernable influence of personal and (...)
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  10. Michael Lockwood (1984). Einstein and the Identity Theory. Analysis 44 (January):22-25.score: 216.0
    Using the special theory of relativity to show that if mental events have a temporal location, then they must have a spatial location.
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  11. Fred Feldman (1974). Kripke on the Identity Theory. Journal of Philosophy 71 (October):665-76.score: 210.0
  12. Berent Enc (1983). In Defense of the Identity Theory. Journal of Philosophy 80 (May):279-98.score: 210.0
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  13. W. Teed Rockwell (2005). Neither Brain nor Ghost: A Nondualist Alternative to the Mind-Brain Identity Theory. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.score: 210.0
  14. Norman Malcolm (1964). Scientific Materialism and the Identity Theory. Dialogue 3 (02):115-25.score: 210.0
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  15. Jaegwon Kim (1966). On the Psycho-Physical Identity Theory. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (July):227-35.score: 210.0
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  16. J.-B. Blumenfeld (1985). Phenomenal Properties and the Identity Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63 (December):485-93.score: 210.0
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  17. Kenneth G. Lucey (1975). The Testability of the Identity Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 53 (August):142-147.score: 210.0
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  18. Laurence F. Mucciolo (1974). The Identity Theory and Criteria for the Mental. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (December):167-80.score: 210.0
  19. James E. Tomberlin (1965). About the Identity Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (December):295-99.score: 210.0
  20. Robert L. Livermore (1982). Introspection Versus the Identity Theory: An Unnecessary Conflict. Noûs 16 (September):387-398.score: 210.0
  21. Evelyn Begley Pluhar (1977). Physicalism and the Identity Theory. Journal of Critical Analysis 7 (1):11-20.score: 210.0
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  22. Simon van Rysewyk, Critique of Max Velmans on Mind-Brain Identity Theory and Consciousness – Part I.score: 210.0
  23. Simon van Rysewyk, Why Are Pain Patients All Unique? A Type-Token Identity Theory Answer.score: 210.0
  24. Ernest Sosa (1965). Professor Malcolm on "Scientific Materialism and the Identity Theory". Dialogue 4 (04):422-23.score: 210.0
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  25. Simon van Rysewyk, Mind-Brain Identity Theory, ‘Brain-Sex’ Theory of Transsexualism and the Dimorphic Brain.score: 210.0
  26. Frederick R. Adams (1979). Properties, Functionalism, and the Identity Theory. Eidos 1 (December):153-79.score: 210.0
  27. Eric P. Polten (1973). Critique Of The Psycho-Physical Identity Theory. The Hague: Mouton.score: 210.0
     
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  28. C. P. Presley (ed.) (1967). The Identity Theory of Mind. University of Queensland Press.score: 210.0
     
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  29. Marvin C. Sterling (1978). Topic-Neutrality and the Identity Theory. Southwest Philosophical Studies 3 (April):41-48.score: 210.0
     
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  30. James D. Windes (1975). Intentionality, Behavior, and Identity Theory. Behaviorism 3:156-161.score: 210.0
  31. Andrew Crane & Trish Ruebottom (2011). Stakeholder Theory and Social Identity: Rethinking Stakeholder Identification. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):77-87.score: 204.0
    In this article, we propose an adaption to stakeholder theory whereby stakeholders are conceptualized on the basis of their social identity. We begin by offering a critical review of both traditional and more recent developments in stakeholder theory, focusing in particular on the way in which stakeholder categories are identified. By identifying critical weaknesses in the existing approach, as well as important points of strength, we outline an alternative approach that refines our understanding of stakeholders in important (...)
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  32. James Giles (1993). The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.score: 192.0
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view (...)
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  33. Neil Campbell (1999). Putnam on the Token-Identity Theory. Philosophia 27 (3-4):567-574.score: 192.0
    Putnam raises two objections against the token-identity theory in his _Dewey Lectures. (1) Token-physicalism invokes a mysterious or _sui generis concept of identity between mental and physical event tokens; (2) The theory suffers from explanatory failure because it cannot individuate mental events using physical criteria. I argue that the first claim is false, since Davidson adopts the same criterion of identity Quine employs for ordinary objects which invokes a concept of identity we understand clearly (...)
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  34. Edward S. Shirley (1974). Rorty's "Disappearance" Version of the Identity Theory. Philosophical Studies 25 (January):73-75.score: 192.0
    In "mind-Body identity, Privacy and categories" richard rorty set forth a new form of the identity theory of the mind, (called the 'disappearance' version) in which he suggested that instead of identifying sensations with neural events, Sensations might be eliminated. Using an illustration of rorty's I show that 'pain' cannot come to refer to a brain process for neural events are neither pleasant nor unpleasant. For 'pain' to refer to something unpleasant, We would have to give 'brain (...)
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  35. Julian Dodd (2000). An Identity Theory of Truth. St. Martin's Press.score: 192.0
    This book argues that correspondence theories of truth fail because the relation that holds between a true thought and a fact is that of identity, not correspondence. Facts are not complexes of worldly entities which make thoughts true they are merely true thoughts. According to Julian Dodd, the resulting modest identity theory , while not defining truth, correctly diagnoses the failure of correspondence theories, and thereby prepares the ground for a defensible deflation of the concept of truth.
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  36. Anthony Shiver (2013). Mereological Bundle Theory and the Identity of Indiscernibles. Synthese:1-13.score: 192.0
    Paul (Noûs 36:578–596, 2002; Noûs 40:623–659, 2006, The Handbook of Mereology, forthcoming) has argued for a bundle theory of objects that analyzes the bundling relation between properties and objects in terms of parthood relations. In this paper I argue that any mereological bundle theory with the explanatory power of Paul’s theory will entail the principle of the identity of indiscernibles (PII). This is problematic, since similar bundle theories seem to fall to Max Black’s two sphere counterexample (...)
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  37. Barbara Hannan & Keith Lehrer (1989). Compatibilism, Determinism, and the Identity Theory. Inquiry 32 (March):49-54.score: 192.0
    Two issues are raised with regard to Ted Honderich's A Theory of Determinism. First, regarding the relation between a token identity theory of mental and physical events and Honderich's ?psychoneural union theory?, it is suggested that a token identity theory would serve Honderich's purposes while securing a simpler ontology. Second, it is argued that there is a substantive philosophical issue dividing compatibilists and incompatibilists on the question of whether persons possess free will, contrary to (...)
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  38. John Kekes (1966). Physicalism, the Identity Theory, and the Concept of Emergence. Philosophy of Science 33 (December):360-75.score: 192.0
    I physicalism1 and the weak identity theory deny, while physicalism2 and the radical identity theory assert, that raw feels can be accomodated in a purely physicalistic framework. II A way of interpreting the claim of physicalism1 is that raw feels are emergents. III The doctrine of emergence asserts that: (i) there are different levels of existence, (ii) these levels of existence are distinguishable on the basis of the behaviour of entities of that level, and (iii) an (...)
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  39. J. R. Smythies (1994). Requiem for the Identity Theory. Inquiry 37 (3):311-29.score: 192.0
    This paper examines the impact that recent advances in clinical neurology, introspectionist psychology and neuroscience have upon the philosophical psycho?neural Identity Theory. Topics covered include (i) the nature and properties of phenomenal consciousness based on a study of the ?basic? visual field, i.e. that obtained in the complete dark, the Ganzfeld, and during recovery from occipital lobe injuries; (ii) the nature of the ?body?image? of neurology and its relation to the physical body; (iii) Descartes? error in choosing extension (...)
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  40. Allison Weir (1996). Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity. Routledge.score: 192.0
    Contemporary feminist theory is at an impasse: the project of reformulating concepts of self and social identity is thwarted by an association between identity and oppression and victimhood. In Sacrificial Logics, Allison Weir proposes a way out of this impasse through a concept of identity which depends on accepting difference. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational" feminists like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection (...)
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  41. Pi-Yueh Cheng & Mei-Chin Chu (2013). Behavioral Factors Affecting Students' Intentions to Enroll in Business Ethics Courses: A Comparison of the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Cognitive Theory Using Self-Identity as a Moderator. Journal of Business Ethics:1-12.score: 192.0
    The current study used both Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior (TPB) and Bandura’s social cognitive theory (SCT) to examine the intentions of business undergraduate students toward taking elective ethics courses and investigated the role of self-identity in this process. The study was prospective in design; data on predictors and intentions were obtained during the first collection of data, whereas the actual behavior was assessed 10 days later. Our results indicated that the TPB was a better predictor of (...)
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  42. Erik Palmgren (2012). Proof-Relevance of Families of Setoids and Identity in Type Theory. Archive for Mathematical Logic 51 (1-2):35-47.score: 192.0
    Families of types are fundamental objects in Martin-Löf type theory. When extending the notion of setoid (type with an equivalence relation) to families of setoids, a choice between proof-relevant or proof-irrelevant indexing appears. It is shown that a family of types may be canonically extended to a proof-relevant family of setoids via the identity types, but that such a family is in general proof-irrelevant if, and only if, the proof-objects of identity types are unique. A similar result (...)
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  43. Jan E. Stets & Chris F. Biga (2003). Bringing Identity Theory Into Environmental Sociology. Sociological Theory 21 (4):398-423.score: 186.0
    In an effort to explain pro-environmental behavior, environmental sociologists often study environmental attitudes. While much of this work is atheoretical, the focus on attitudes suggests that researchers are implicitly drawing upon attitude theory in psychology. The present research brings sociological theory to environmental sociology by drawing on identity theory to understand environmentally responsive behavior. We develop an environment identity model of environmental behavior that includes not only the meanings of the environment identity, but also (...)
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  44. Mardi J. Horowitz (2012). Self-Identity Theory and Research Methods. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M14.score: 186.0
    Identity disturbances are common in clinical conditions and personality measures need to extend to assessment of coherence in underlying levels of self-coherence. The problem has been difficult to solve because self-organization is a complex unconscious set of mind/brain processes embedded in social roles and values. Theory helps us address this problem and suggests methods and limitations of interpretation that involve self-reports of subjects, observers who rate subjects, and narrative analyses of verbal communications from subjects.
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  45. J. J. C. Smart, The Identity Theory of Mind. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 180.0
    The identity theory of mind holds that states and processes of the mind are identical to states and processes of the brain. Strictly speaking, it need not hold that the mind is identical to the brain. Idiomatically we do use ‘She has a good mind’ and ‘She has a good brain’ interchangeably but we would hardly say ‘Her mind weighs fifty ounces’. Here I take identifying mind and brain as being a matter of identifying processes and perhaps states (...)
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  46. William P. Bechtel & Robert N. McCauley (1999). Heuristic Identity Theory (or Back to the Future): The Mind-Body Problem Against the Background of Research Strategies in Cognitive Neuroscience. In Martin Hahn & S. C. Stoness (eds.), Proceedings of the 21st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 67-72.score: 180.0
    Functionalists in philosophy of mind traditionally raise two major arguments against the type identity theory: (1) psychological states are _multiply realizable_ so that there are no one-to-one mappings of psychological states onto neural states and (2) the most that evidence could ever establish is the _correlation_ of psychological and neural states, not their identity. We defend a variant on the traditional type identity theory which we call _heuristic identity theory_ (HIT) against both of these (...)
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  47. Jesper Kallestrup (2008). Three Strands in Kripke's Argument Against the Identity Theory. Philosophy Compass 3 (6):1255-1280.score: 180.0
    Kripke's argument against the identity theory in the philosophy of mind runs as follows. Suppose some psychophysical identity statement S is true. Then S would seem to be contingent at least in the sense that S seems possibly false. And given that seeming contingency entails genuine contingency when it comes to such statements S is contingent. But S is necessary if true. So S is false. This entry considers responses to each of the three premises. It turns (...)
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  48. C. Hill (2009). The Identity Theory. In Tim Bayne, Axel Cleeremans & Patrick Wilken (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press. 359--363.score: 180.0
    Identity theory The doctrine that mental states are identical with physical states was defended in antiquity by Lucretius and in the early modern era by Hobbes. It achieved considerable prominence in the 1950s as a result of the writings of Herbert Feigl, U. T. Place, and J. J. C. Smart. (See, e.g., Smart (1959). These authors developed reasonably precise formulations of the doctrine, clarified the grounds for embracing it, and responded persuasively to a range of objections. More recently (...)
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  49. Stewart Candlish, The Identity Theory of Truth. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 180.0
    is true, there is a truth-maker (e.g., a fact) with which it is identical and the truth of the former consists in its identity with the latter. The theory is best understood as a reaction to the correspondence theory, according to which the relation of truth-bearer to truth-maker is correspondence. A correspondence theory is vulnerable to the nagging suspicion that if the best we can do is make statements that merely correspond to the truth, then we (...)
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